Do you think of "Nursing Education" as a nursing specialty? - page 3

This month's survey Question: Do you think of "Nursing Education" as a nursing specialty? Please take a minute to take answer our survey and please feel free to reply to this topic to post any... Read More

  1. by   midwiftippitoes
    Quote from midwiftippitoes
    I am a new nurse educator, LPN nursing instructor, after 21 years as a Nurse midwife. I feel that you need to have the experience to be able to give the students the passion that you feel. I to am going back to school, to earn a Masters as a CNS, so that I can teach in an Assoicate nursing program. I am learning how to teach, which is not easy. So many times the students want you to give them the answers so they will not have to do any work. I think being a nurse educator is very challenging. i know the content and I am learning the methods. last year I went to Memphis TN to a conference for nurse educators and learned so much. It is not how you get up in front of the class and present the material but how the students take responsibility for learning themselves. I love the subject I am teaching and I am learning a new subject for me Pharmacology now if anyone can help me make this fun I would like to know especially after lunch.

    The greatest joy is being a mother , the second greatest joy is being a midwife
  2. by   missmercy
    Quote from errnwith3kids
    Nursing education is definitely a specialty. It isn't something you can just do; you must have extra education (a MSN- the same as all specialty nursing- NPs, CRNAs, CNMs, and CNSs). The difference is the specialty of clinical experience, which educators do not necessarily get. However, I can tell you after my 2 years doing my MSN I dare someone to tell me I am not a specialist compared to my peers. I have a tremendous amount of education and have worked hard to gain the knowledge to teach.
    I whole heartedly agree -- a clinical nurse specialist may have found the perfect fit for her goals and aspirations, but as is the case of this particular person-- may not have learned how to play nicely with others or how to teach those skills to others. I have nearly 20 years of bedside nursing experience and now (with my MSN in nursing education/administration) am well equipt to teach those skills to others as well -- I have learned about teaching strategies, learning styles, presence etc. It REALLY yanks my crank when this particular CNS diva stands before the other members of the facility's education department and states that those of us without our CNS certification are "merely master's prepared nurses". I too worked hard to get where I am today -- just because I choose a different path than she has should not in any way threaten her and cause her to be so defensive and belittling!

    This same CNS came to my office and informed me that I "need to return to school,(told me which school I should attend, who my advisor should e and what clases to take) and get my pediatric CNS so that I could be useful and fill a gap in our CNS coverage here". The advice was not only unsolicited but unappreciated. My goal is to teach at a nearby University (which I am in the process of interviewing for -- so I can leave this place and work where the degree I have is valued). When I do return to school -- it will be to earn my Phd or doctorate of nursing ed. NOT my CNS -- not because I look down on CNS certification, but because the other fits better with the goals I have.

    Why we can't appreciate and capitalize on the different strengths we all have is beyond me! Our different goals and gifts COULD make our department great -- instead, this person is intent on tearing it apart. In this particular case, even our director has come inder this CNS's fire -- the director is "merely a master's prepared nurse" as well. She has however bought into the notion that the CNS (who is NOT management) should direct the direction the department goes. I believe she is overwhelmed by her workload and intimidated by this particular CNS. There is little communication with the rest of the department. I can't see myself sticking around much longer.
  3. by   Energizer Bunny
    I'm just a student, but I'll tell you what I have observed with my current educators. They are EXTREMELY KNOWLEDGEABLE and have put in more schooling and more bedside time than many of us will ever see. I vote yes!
  4. by   BeachNurse
    I voted YES. I have the pleasure of working with two nurse educators. They were both hired with experience and they both are NP's/Master Degreed. I have tremendous respect and admiration for them. They travel around the state to talk about all aspects of HIV and help coordinate education for our department's employees. I really enjoy hearing them speak..they love what they do and it shows. True nurse educators do far more than simple patient education.
  5. by   AFirestone
    I do think that Nursing Education is a specialty...I at least hope it is as I am working on my masters in it at this time!!

    In fact, I am doing some research and having a hard time finding easy to access nursing newletters. Any tips?
  6. by   teeituptom
    theres that old saying

    Those that can do it

    those who cant, teach it

    so maybe its a specialty of those who cant
  7. by   missmercy
    Quote from teeituptom
    theres that old saying

    Those that can do it

    those who cant, teach it

    so maybe its a specialty of those who cant
    OOOOOHHHH! Low blow.:stone Educators not only CAN, but have to be able to DO it AND explain it to others in simple enough terms that the novices can understand it and be able to figure out how to do it too. Anybody can go through motions -- monkeys can be trained to DO stuff -- higher intelligence is needed to teach and train the monkeys!
  8. by   barefootlady
    Nursing education is not a speciality in the facility setting, because as some other posters have said, sometimes they are the only one who applied for the job, have little practical experience, have earned the position by doing favors for administration, and are mostly not prepared to really teach. In all of my years, I can count on one hand the nurse educators in a facility who really did the job and did it well.
    I have spent too many hours, including some in November, being taught by a person who had no practical experience, in fact, she was wrong and needed help by us poor working nurses to point out she had her presentation backwards. She was not appreciative, and we were not too interested in what she had to say.
  9. by   missmercy
    Quote from barefootlady
    Nursing education is not a speciality in the facility setting, because as some other posters have said, sometimes they are the only one who applied for the job, have little practical experience, have earned the position by doing favors for administration, and are mostly not prepared to really teach. In all of my years, I can count on one hand the nurse educators in a facility who really did the job and did it well.
    I have spent too many hours, including some in November, being taught by a person who had no practical experience, in fact, she was wrong and needed help by us poor working nurses to point out she had her presentation backwards. She was not appreciative, and we were not too interested in what she had to say.
    I pity those of you who have had poor experiences with educators. It is a shame that those bad examples have jaded you toward educators as a speciality though.
    If you had a dentist you were unhappy with, would that cause you to write off all dentists? How about all mechanics? All plumbers? Granted- there are aa vast number of "pseudo educators" wandering the hallways of facilities giving inservices or lecturing staff on techniques with little knowledge of the procedure and even less about the learning process fo those they are teaching: but there are also those of us who have worked very hard as staff nurses, continued on with our education to get degrees in nursing education -- specifically to learn how to best teach nurses how to be better nurses.
    I love being a nurse and teaching nursing as well. I love teaching adult learners -- they are motivated, intelligent and often interested. You are right, not everyone can teach! It is a specialty -- a gift - a calling -- much like nursing is. And to teach nursing - Whew!
  10. by   Mars
    Quote from barefootlady
    Nursing education is not a speciality in the facility setting, because as some other posters have said, sometimes they are the only one who applied for the job, have little practical experience, have earned the position by doing favors for administration, and are mostly not prepared to really teach. In all of my years, I can count on one hand the nurse educators in a facility who really did the job and did it well.
    I have spent too many hours, including some in November, being taught by a person who had no practical experience, in fact, she was wrong and needed help by us poor working nurses to point out she had her presentation backwards. She was not appreciative, and we were not too interested in what she had to say.

    I'm not sure if the facility you work in is that bad, or maybe the view from your position is so bad. Unfortunately when I was an educator, I also witnessed those who did not do their nursing job well. Does that mean you think they are not nurses????? I think that using a poor performer to justify a belief is poor logic at best.


    You are certainly right that some persons get a position (even staff nurses sometimes) for the wrong reason, and some individuals even fail to perform the responsibilities of a position. However, a qualified nurse educator MUST use knowledge from both the nursing domain and the education domain. A compenent educator IS a specialist as they have additional knowledge beyond the basic nursing education.

    I sure hope you can share your concerns with administration at your facility. If you look at required compentencies for nursing and nursing educators, your organization has a long way to go to achieve quality care. If things are as bad as you indicate, I hope you can steer them in the right direction. What a wonderful opportunity!
    Mars
    Last edit by Mars on Jan 24, '05
  11. by   barefootlady
    Seems like my truthful comment was not appreciated , Sorry but that is a true statement of just how terrible some of the so-called educators I've had have been. Yes, we do feed back forms on presentations, and we have consistantly marked some "educators" as bad, unprepared, off topic, not enough knowledge to present properly but it gets us nowhere. One so called educator, paid for at a big price by the facility, showed up with liquor on her breathe and preceeded to give us a hour long speech on how alcohol can and does effect behavior. The presentation was supposed to be on cardiac related care. I truly appreciate a good education program, but I just do not get that many presented to me. Talked to another nurse today, has 20 years experience, and was called "out of date and out of touch" with todays nursing for answering a question from an educator truthfully, she said she did change the needle prior to injection of meds if she drew it up from a rubber capped bottle. Educator stated todays needles do not get dull while drawing up med and it was a waste of nurses time. This nurse was made to feel stupid, outdated, and useless by this socalled modern educator. Like I said, I just calls it as I see it or experience it.
  12. by   Blackbird
    I feel it's important for a nursing educator to be a nurse, that is to have nursing degree. Likewise, I find it amazing that those who do not possess teaching qualifications are allowed to be nursing educators. You wouldn't let an untrained nurse near your patients so why treat your students with the same contempt? Teaching is a specialisation unto itself, not merely a branch of nursing. Does one attend university expecting their professor to be unqualified? Does one expect their car to be repaired by a mechanic who has only studied cars via books?

    Unfortunately, as with nurses, teachers also are grossly underrated and disrespected as a valuable member of the community. The replication of wives' tales, while unfortunate, only points to the ignorance of those who repeat them.
  13. by   chronicTX
    ABSOLUTELY! fftopic:

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