Do you see a generational gap in nursing? - page 5

I don't know if it is just me, or just where I work, but I am seeing a major generational gap between nurses. The ones in their mid 20's just seem to be lacking a work ethic. I am not an old foggie, I am 43. the newer gals just... Read More

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    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    P.S. To the above:

    If you want to see a near perfect blend of how nursing, seniority and religous life were, at least in film, watch the "Nun's Story".

    There is a scene where "Sister Luke" who was the daughter of a physican and excellent in the study of microbiology is taking that course with a senior nun, who is failing badly. If the senior nun failed the course she would not be allowed to return to the order's mission in the Congo, but shamed because she "failed' to a junior sister/nun (Sister Luke) and likely to be replaced by her.

    Sister Luke is asked to "throw" her board exam in order to allow the senior sister/nurse to save face. However in one of the most brilliant scenes in film, a struggling Sister Luke cannot over ride her own self will/pride, and gives correct answers. She comes in fourth out of a class of nearly 50 or so. For this she is not sent to the Congo, but packed off to nurse at an insane asylum. Which goes to show there is something to be said for humility

    ...and doesn't she end up leaving the religious life in the end?

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  2. 0
    Thanks for all the replies! I think there is a generational gap anywhere you go, between all generations! and i agree- there are "bad apples" in each generation! Again, thanks for all the input!
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    I grew up in a working class community.. believe me, no sense of entitlement with people my age there. But then I went to an expensive public university (on scholarship), and it was like a different world -- lots of kids who grew up with those helicopter parents who would call their kids' university professors to argue about the B their kids got in the class. Seriously? So I do recognize that many of my peers are like this. However, I still find most of what was in this thread highly offensive.. just as I would any stereotype, be it about my gender, race, anything else. It's beyond frustrating being unfairly judged, whatever the reason. (And, yes, I know that the answer to my being offended is to not read the thread, but curiosity got the best of me. )
    RNJess10 likes this.
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    Say, "YAH!" to sweeping, ignorant generalizations!

    Pfft.
    TheSquire, JacobK, whichone'spink, and 1 other like this.
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    Quote from cwhitebn
    i am a new nurse, in my early 20s and during my first orientation to my new job as an rn we had a lecture on generational gaps...and it's true, they do exist but not because of the "we're lazy" excuse.

    my generation, the millenia generation, grew up in a setting where our parents worked hard, were never home with the kids. our generation have decided that our family is more important than our work and i will not be a slave to my work. if i call in sick, it's not cause i'm hung over, lazy, or feel i've done enough....it's cause i want to be with my family.

    i work to live; not live to work.
    you've taken the words out of my mouth in terms of "work to live; not live to work." i would not, however, call in sick to be with my family, but i will not be guilted into taking more shifts or spend my life entirely immersed in my career. call me entitled, call me a 20-something snot, but don't call me a person whose life passed them by while they were at work.
  6. 0
    Quote from Mulan
    ...and doesn't she end up leaving the religious life in the end?
    Yes, in both the book (based on a real life story), and film, "Sister Luke" does leave the order.

    The Catechism of the Church teaches us that self will dies fifteen minutes before we ourselves do, or is that fifteen minutes afterwards?

    In any event Sister Luke was unable to "bend", and subjugate herself to the will of God as expressed through His instruments, her superiors.

    Religous obedience, at least as it was often practiced at that time by certain orders, required allot of a person. Especially for someone as strong willed as Sister Luke. She cites the rules of the bells, which would cause her to stop speaking with a patient even at the minute he/she needed her most, and begin to observe the "grand slience", as difficult. That may have been true if one puts being a nurse first above all things, but it is pointed out to Sister Luke, she was a nun first and shouldn't have entered religous life to become a nurse.

    Bringing this on home, in relation to nursing practice, it was often the same. One was simply told/taught how to do something, and wasn't supposed to ask why (no theory and rationale), and then left to get on. If bed making was supposed to require "X" amount of steps, and you found a faster/easier way but it required less steps, guess what? Permission would often be denied to use "your" method because it was not "the" approved way.
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    I don't believe it has to do with a generational gap. I am in my mid 30's and nursing is my second career. Coming from a corporate environment I saw people who devoted 25 plus yrs to their job and were given the pink slip. It didn't matter that they came in on their sick days, or stayed late to work, or gave up time away from their family. My life outside of work is more important. SO if I can't make it or need a mental health day I will put myself first. Because we are easily replaceable by administration.

    Kudos to this generation for putting themselves first maybe if this was done in earlier generations nurses wouldn't be carrying this martyr attitude on their shoulder. ANd we'd get more respect from administration.
    WyndDrivenRain, noyesno, TheSquire, and 4 others like this.
  8. 1
    Quote from Wsmith16
    I don't believe it has to do with a generational gap. I am in my mid 30's and nursing is my second career. Coming from a corporate environment I saw people who devoted 25 plus yrs to their job and were given the pink slip. It didn't matter that they came in on their sick days, or stayed late to work, or gave up time away from their family. My life outside of work is more important. SO if I can't make it or need a mental health day I will put myself first. Because we are easily replaceable by administration.

    Kudos to this generation for putting themselves first maybe if this was done in earlier generations nurses wouldn't be carrying this martyr attitude on their shoulder. ANd we'd get more respect from administration.
    There is tis in a nutshell.

    On one side you have those who see nursing as a "calling" as it were. A profession rich in traditions and customs that should be upheld and passed on. On the other side there are those who see nursing as a "job", just a means to an end but not something to get worked up into a sweat about.

    Not picking sides, nor saying which camp is correct. Will confine my remarks to this: nurses have chosen to remain at bedside/with their patients during times of war, famine, epidemics, and for that they were often raped, beaten, killed, died of disease, and suffered many other types of abuse, both physical and mental. Many of these nurses were girls/women often of the best families and could have easily spent their time safe somewhere else out of harms way.

    Martyrdom? Perhaps. They certainly got scant thanks or recognition for their efforts. Working conditions were often horrible, and the pay, well less said about that the better.
    bonn_bai likes this.
  9. 3
    reply to original post: Well, I suppose part of it might be the parenting. But more likely, the younger ones have seen how employers have become more adversarial and less appreciative of good and loyal employees, and how raises, pay for performance, and job security have been largely eliminated by overt and covert actions by employers and regulatory and governmental agencies. Additionally, the schools have been moving away from turning out "good obedient factoryworkers" to creating more free-thinking and free-wheeling entrepreneurs who are me-firsters and don't believe that they owe loyalty to any employer because employers are against employees nowadays. I think the attitudes of the younger workforce have been shaped by a multitude of factors and societal and economic changes, not by any one specific thing.
  10. 0
    Quote from JacobK
    "I see no hope for the future of our people if they are dependent on frivolous youth of today, for certainly all youth are reckless beyond words... When I was young, we were taught to be discreet and respectful of elders, but the present youth are exceedingly disrespectful and impatient of restraint." ~ Hesiod 700 B.C.

    ...

    hahahaha! at 700 B.C. = same gripe as today


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