Do Nurses Earn Big Money? You Decide. - page 14

Am I the only one who becomes at least mildly irritated whenever a random individual finds out that someone is a nurse and proceeds to say, "You're rolling in the big bucks!" To keep things... Read More

  1. Visit  somenurse profile page
    0
    Quote from samadams8
    I guess I want to see what nurses think about the stunted growth of income after being in the field for quite some time.

    sam, i will have to agree with you here.

    i was surprised, that during 30+ years of nursing, my starting income was not much bigger 30 years later.

    also,
    if i moved from one state to another,
    and had to start all over as new employee,
    the starting pay there
    was not much bigger at all
    than the starting pay i got decades before.


    *sigh*
  2. Visit  PRICHARILLAisMISSED profile page
    0
    Quote from samadams8
    Oh wow, I'm sorry. I messed up and referred to you as a female too. Guess I thought it was you standing by that bike. LOL

    But what do you think about my point that you go in making more that the Walmart employee, but after a number of decades, you haven't gone too far past that, compared to your peers in other fields--unless you go into administration or say pharm sales or go to CRNA school?
    Well (usual disclaimer that I am not in the Nursing field yet, so my answer would be drawn from my personal experiences in my current field...), after a decade or so, I would imagine that most would want to ""Graduate" to a specialty that pays more anyway, so while the pay jump wont equal the Walmart guys pay jump percentage wise, the actual pay per hour would grow more than the Walmart guy. I haven't researched Pharmacy sales, but I checked a little into CRNA's and it seems extremely worth wile for someone to pursue. Not that I necessarily plan on going that route as I will wait to be exposed to my option once I actually "Get in."

    Also, unlike the Walmart employee, you start off relatively high. A Walmart employee can start out at $9/hr or so and can realistically expect to double that in ten years and 2 promotions. I wouldn't think it would be realistic going into ANY profession starting at, say $30/hr and think that I'd be making $60/hr in ten years, you know? The Walmart guy can double his wages because they started out as crap. Nurses not so much (Again, just what I imagine. I have no experience as a Nurse as of yet)
  3. Visit  PRICHARILLAisMISSED profile page
    1
    Quote from Jean Marie46514
    sorry if i referred to you as wrong gender. It was not intentional.


    and i thought the same as you, Pricharilla, that people on govt aide WAS part of the topic, too!!
    lol. No worries. I was joking about it bothering me anyway. BTW Pricharilla was my dog. That is not my name. I'm guessing that is why I'm usually assumed to be a woman
    somenurse likes this.
  4. Visit  TheCommuter profile page
    1
    Quote from Jean Marie46514
    btw, The Commuter, i could be wrong, but i think that EITC is only given to students
    Read the following from the IRS website regarding eligibility for EITC. You do not need to be a student to receive EITC. Being lower income with at least one qualifying child is the main way to become eligible.
    Who can claim the credit and and if I qualify, how do I get it?

    To claim EITC on your tax return, you must meet all the following rules:

    • You, your spouse (if you file a joint return), and all other listed on Schedule EIC, must have a valid Social Security Number.
    • You must have earned income from working for someone else or running or operating a farm or business;
    • Your filing status cannot be married filing separately.
    • You must be a U.S. citizen or resident alien all year, or a nonresident alien married to a U.S. citizen or resident alien and filing a joint return.
    • You cannot be a qualifying child of another person.
    • You cannot file Form 2555 or Form 2555 EZ. (Related to foreign earn income)
    • You must meet these EITC Income Limits, Maximum Credit Amounts and Tax Law Updates
    • And you must meet one of the following:
      • Have a qualifying child (see who is a qualifying child below), or
      • If you do not have a qualifying child, you must:
        • be age 25 but under 65 at the end of the year,
        • live in the United States for more than half the year, and
        • not qualify as a dependent of another person.

    If you qualify for EITC, you have to file a tax return with the IRS, even if you owe no tax or are not required to file.
    EITC, Earned Income Tax Credit, Questions and Answers
    somenurse likes this.
  5. Visit  somenurse profile page
    0
    Quote from TheCommuter
    Read the following from the IRS website regarding eligibility for EITC. You do not need to be a student to receive EITC. Being lower income with at least one qualifying child is the main way to become eligible.
    EITC, Earned Income Tax Credit, Questions and Answers

    oh, sorry, you are right, that is not the one that students get. There is a tax break that some college students can get.

    this EITC might be what so many many parents get each year?

    those thousands of dollars in tax refunds that many to most single mom nurses get every April? (and some married parents, too)


    honestly, i don't know what those $1,000s that parents get back are called, to tell you the truth. Guess it doesn't matter,
    but, in your post about the single mom nurse, raising 3 kids,
    NOT getting a tax refund,
    made me think, "That Carla should have an accountant do her taxes, cuz, a single mom nurse raising 3 kids should get a tax refund of a few thousand dollars!! Most parents do!"
  6. Visit  PRICHARILLAisMISSED profile page
    0
    Quote from mrmedical
    But as it stands, I feel that we are well compensated on the basis of 36 hour work weeks and 3 days a week of work (others mileage may very depending on their schedual and how poor their work enviroment is - but those aren't exactly intrinsic to nursing itself).
    I don't think this is "New topic" worthy, so please forgive me going off topic for just this last one. Why is it that I see so many posters (in other topics as well) say they only work 3 days a week? are hours that hard to come by, I mean is it really that bad? why isn't the average schedule 4 days at 12 hrs a day. I was under the impression 48 hours a week was the norm in Nursing. Is it not? Is it fairly easy to pick up that extra shift. I just assumed 48hrs was standard, like Paramedics.
  7. Visit  somenurse profile page
    1
    Quote from PRICHARILLAisMISSED
    I don't think this is "New topic" worthy, so please forgive me going off topic for just this last one. Why is it that I see so many posters (in other topics as well) say they only work 3 days a week? are hours that hard to come by, I mean is it really that bad? why isn't the average schedule 4 days at 12 hrs a day. I was under the impression 48 hours a week was the norm in Nursing. Is it not? Is it fairly easy to pick up that extra shift. I just assumed 48hrs was standard, like Paramedics.

    Many nurses work 3 twelve hour shifts per week. 36 hours per week. Many of the hospitals see that as "full time", and that nurse would get "full time" benefits, as compared to the less benefits that a "part time" nurse would get.

    Most hospitals i've worked at, would see 48 hours per week, if done every week, as 40 hours work plus 8 hours of overtime. But, that could vary from place to place, i guess.
    PRICHARILLAisMISSED likes this.
  8. Visit  TheCommuter profile page
    0
    Quote from PRICHARILLAisMISSED
    I don't think this is "New topic" worthy, so please forgive me going off topic for just this last one. Why is it that I see so many posters (in other topics as well) say they only work 3 days a week? are hours that hard to come by, I mean is it really that bad? why isn't the average schedule 4 days at 12 hrs a day. I was under the impression 48 hours a week was the norm in Nursing. Is it not? Is it fairly easy to pick up that extra shift. I just assumed 48hrs was standard, like Paramedics.
    My workplace does not like to schedule four 12-hour shifts per week because they do not want to pay the overtime (time and a half) for the fourth shift.
  9. Visit  PRICHARILLAisMISSED profile page
    0
    Quote from Jean Marie46514
    Many nurses work 3 twelve hour shifts per week. 36 hours per week. Many of the hospitals see that as "full time", and that nurse would get "full time" benefits, as compared to the less benefits that a "part time" nurse would get.

    Most hospitals i've worked at, would see 48 hours per week, if done every week, as 40 hours work plus 8 hours of overtime. But, that could vary from place to place, i guess.
    Thanks for the info. That's not good. I guess I'll have to hope shifts open more often than not.
  10. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    0
    Quote from PRICHARILLAisMISSED
    In most places $50k is more than enough for a family of six to be fairly comfortable. I'm from Brooklyn, and we called you Connecticuters the "Rich" people lol. So over there $50k won't even come close to raising a family of 6. Once you get away from the Tri state area though, cost of living drops dramatically. It really does.
    Yes, it is true that once you leave the Tri-State area and or for the most part much of the North East for that matter the cost of living drops *dramatically* but guess what? So do wages paid for similar or same employment.

    Lots of nurses and others are decamping from NY/NJ to the South only to find out yes the cost of living is much less but they also are paid less, in some cases much less and that is if they can find work at all.

    Part of the reason wages are so high in this area (we also live in NYC) is because of the high cost of living. Remove that from the equation and employers adjust wages downward to reflect the local conditions on the ground. Go ahead, ask around Atlanta, Mobile, Charleston, etc... and see how many new grads much less experienced RNs are pulling the average salary (>$74K/year) NYC hospitals offer.

    Have quite a few friends and family that have moved down South, the only ones really doing well are the older/retired persons who made "NYC money" and brought it down there with them. For the younger crowd it can be a struggle often having to work two or more jobs (again if they can find them) to make ends meet.
  11. Visit  somenurse profile page
    1
    Quote from PRICHARILLAisMISSED
    Thanks for the info. That's not good. I guess I'll have to hope shifts open more often than not.

    well, some nurse prefer the 12s, some prefer the 8 hour shifts.
    There is a plus to either one, and a drawback to either one.

    Each nurse you ask,
    would come up with different list,
    but, to me,
    the 12s have these "plusses"

    You can string them together, and get almost a whole week off !!! woo hoo!! See, if you work last 3 days of week one,
    and first 3 days of week two,
    you can get about a week off all in a row!! So handy!! but, yeah, you are pretty much toast after working 72 hours in 6 days.

    Another plus, of working 12s, is, you often can pass a patient back and forth between 2 nurses. the same nurse who gave you report, might the one coming back to take over that same patient at the end of your shift!!!
    Usually this is a plus, as we both know the patient well, makes report easier, too, and we can follow up with things with each other, less nurses for the patient to 'break in' ha ha!!

    If you work 12s, if you are having a shift that is running behind, sometimes, you can catch up all your paper work, and no one even realizes you were a lil behind on your paper work, since you have that 4 extra hours to catch up on things.
    You get to know your patients even better in 12 hours, imo.
    You can get around to lotsa little extra things that i sometimes had trouble getting done in an 8 hour shift.

    If you work 8 hours shifts, it is probably less tiring to most people's feet, but, you work MORE days per week..you have to get up, get ready, get there, one more time each week,
    but, with 8 hour shifts, you still have time to do something that evening when you get off work, whereas, with 12 hours shifts, i pretty much just worked/laundry/sleep kinda days.


    some hospitals offer four 10 hour shifts per week, too. Normal work week in USA is 40 hours per week, and over that might get overtime pay.

    Some hospitals offer more than one kind of shift, maybe some units are run using 12 hour shifts,
    and some are run using 8 hour shifts, and some on 10.


    I like 12s the best, really. but, that's just me.


    and now, that one guy will probably come scold me 8 times for a derail, sorry.
    Last edit by somenurse on Nov 28, '12
    PRICHARILLAisMISSED likes this.
  12. Visit  PRICHARILLAisMISSED profile page
    0
    ok, DoGoodThenGo brings up a good point. So I change my answer to $70k a year is good money in most places. In truth, back home I wouldn't consider anything less than $135k a decent wage. $74k in NYC must be rough...
  13. Visit  PRICHARILLAisMISSED profile page
    0
    Quote from TheCommuter
    My workplace does not like to schedule four 12-hour shifts per week because they do not want to pay the overtime (time and a half) for the fourth shift.
    Fair enough. But I thought that if it is in the hiring papers (Not contract, but I forget the name) then it isn't called overtime until hour "49"

    Maybe that's just here though. Or I could have just as easily misinterpreted something. Happens...

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