difference of per diem,part time,prn?

  1. 0
    hello..whats the difference of per diem,prn and part time?..thanx.

    Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights newsletter.

  2. 7 Comments...

  3. 0
    I am assuming that you are asking this in relation to medication.
    PRN is an acronym for Pro Re Nata and is a Latin term that means "as needed"

    Per Diem is a Latin word meaning "for the day" or "each day"

    I have never heard of per diem being used with medications... but have heard it used in relation to expenses and is usually a fixed amount for meals/travel/incidentals e.g the per diem rate is £25

    As for part time... no idea how this relates to medication

    Hope that helps
  4. 0
    Depending on where you work the terminology changes.

    perdiem literally means "as required"

    PRN ---as needed

    Part-time usually means something else---depending on percent of FTE.

    You need to ask the HUMAN RESOURCES department of any employer to ask exactly what PRN, Perdiem or Part-Time mean in their institution, and what is required of you in filling any such position. (e.g. minimum # of shifts/month you must work). Their definitions and requirements will vary.
  5. 0
    Ahhh… I’m not thinking “outside the box” today Smilingblueyes! Never even thought of it in terms of employment issues



    So, for example, you might be offered a per diem rate of $25 for working an unsocial shift, plus the hourly rate. Or you might be offered a job PRN, or as required. Or you might be offered a job part-time in which case you are guaranteed a certain amount of hours each week. Correct?
  6. 0
    In most settings, there are significant differences in the employment classifications. Your HR department or employee handbook should clarify these for you. A person can be a "permanent part-time" 32/week hours guaranteed and prorated paid time off and vac, and limited health insurance benefits. Falling under an average of 32 hours per week for a period of time for any reason can put the health insurance benefits at risk.
    A part-timer can also be guaranteed 16-31 hours per week and will only be covered by the required unemployment and workers compensation benefits.
    Per Diem and PRN are essentially float pool, receive generally a higher hourly rate, absolutely no guarantee of hours and only workers comp and unemployment as required by law.
  7. 0
    Quote from jsteine1
    In most settings, there are significant differences in the employment classifications. Your HR department or employee handbook should clarify these for you. A person can be a "permanent part-time" 32/week hours guaranteed and prorated paid time off and vac, and limited health insurance benefits. Falling under an average of 32 hours per week for a period of time for any reason can put the health insurance benefits at risk.
    A part-timer can also be guaranteed 16-31 hours per week and will only be covered by the required unemployment and workers compensation benefits.
    Per Diem and PRN are essentially float pool, receive generally a higher hourly rate, absolutely no guarantee of hours and only workers comp and unemployment as required by law.
    thanks for the input...i always think that per diem and prm as interchangeable..one is as required theother is as needed..hmmmm..i guess ill just have to ask hr then..thanks guys..
  8. 0
    Quote from PamUK
    Ahhh… I’m not thinking “outside the box” today Smilingblueyes! Never even thought of it in terms of employment issues



    So, for example, you might be offered a per diem rate of $25 for working an unsocial shift, plus the hourly rate. Or you might be offered a job PRN, or as required. Or you might be offered a job part-time in which case you are guaranteed a certain amount of hours each week. Correct?
    in some settings, this would be absolutely correct. But again, asking HR is what will net you the most accurate answer. Seems they use these terms differently in each setting, as I have learned. And I have been a PRN'er (per diem as well) for 6 years now.
  9. 0
    At my facility we have two catagories 1. Contingent and 2 Part time Casual.
    Both work no less than 8, no greater than 40 hours per month. Contingent nurses have greater than 2 years of clinical experience and receive a % above what our RN's make. PTC makes whatever # of years of experience (base rate or 1 year) they have.Part time status us usually 8 shifts per month.
    Quote from inwyte
    hello..whats the difference of per diem,prn and part time?..thanx.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top