Did you have a Preemie or Pre Term Labor while working?

  1. I just read an article and had a disscussion with some preemie moms on if on the job stress/exertion can cause PROM.
    I had planned on working until 39 weeks with my first, but PROMed at 36 weeks after a day of working ICU. In, "Every Pregnant Woman's Guide to Preventing Premature Birth", the author, an RN, writes of how many NICU nurses she knows that had preemies.
    I am the only RN I know that did not carry to term, so I thought I'd take an informal survey.
    Were you working when your labor started?
    What unit did you work?
    What week did your Pre Term Labor start?
    When did you deliver?
    Were you given a reason for your PTL?

    Thanks for responses! I am pg now and if I go on bedrest, maybe I'll write a paper! : p
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  2. 23 Comments

  3. by   Michelle in Texas
    Originally posted by dawngloves:
    I just read an article and had a disscussion with some preemie moms on if on the job stress/exertion can cause PROM.
    I had planned on working until 39 weeks with my first, but PROMed at 36 weeks after a day of working ICU. In, "Every Pregnant Woman's Guide to Preventing Premature Birth", the author, an RN, writes of how many NICU nurses she knows that had preemies.
    I am the only RN I know that did not carry to term, so I thought I'd take an informal survey.
    Were you working when your labor started?
    What unit did you work?
    What week did your Pre Term Labor start?
    When did you deliver?
    Were you given a reason for your PTL?

    Thanks for responses! I am pg now and if I go on bedrest, maybe I'll write a paper! : p
    Hello. In 1991 I went into pre-term labor with my first child at 32 weeks while on the floor of a Cardiac Telemetry unit. Fortunately they were able to stop my contractions and I carried him till 39 weeks and delivered a 7 lbs 15 oz boy. He had PDA and Tachycardia and Bradycardia and came home with me. He was able to resolve problems within 4 months. Hope this helps.
    Michelle

    ------------------
    Texan Frog
  4. by   karenrndmc
    Hi,
    With my first pregnancy I worked in an aggressive SICU and went into labor at 31 weeks after coding a patient several times on a 12 hour midnight shift. I was hospitalized and they stopped the labor with drugs and bed rest. They kept me on the drugs till 37 weeks because I came down with the chicken pox's at 35 weeks (imagine that!). I went into labor the day after stopping the drugs and my labor lasted only 5 hours. My second pregnancy I was working days on a fast paced step-down unit and dilated to 3cm at 27 weeks and had many regular brakston hicks . I went off on bed rest and drugs and delivered at 36 weeks the evening after I stopped taking my drugs. (A precipitous 45 min labor). With my third pregnancy I was working in a nice "cardiac rehabilitation" job where I could pace myself. I worked till 35 weeks when I dilated to 3 cm but only stayed off on semi bed rest (because I had two other children at home) and opted not to take the drugs this time since I was already 35 weeks. I walked around till 39 weeks dilated to 3 cm and at 39 weeks with tons of "false labor" scares which would subside when I rested...the doctors decided to induce b/c of my previous labor being so precipitous (and I was driving them crazy). I do believe that my job and stress level had a lot to do with the nature of my labors.
  5. by   tattiarna
    Im an australian nurse who planned to work to 34 weeks while pregnant with twins. I went into labour at 29 weeks while at work. the labour was stopped with medications, but at 31 weeks the twins were born by emergency c-section. i worked on a heavy orthopeadic ward, I do feel it contributed to my early labour.
  6. by   xmasbabe
    I had planned on working until 39 weeks with my first, but PROMed at 36 weeks after a day of working ICU.

    I had planned on working till 40 weeks but went into labor at just 20 weeks. I was working in a very fast paced clinic as the only nurse.

    In, "Every Pregnant Woman's Guide to Preventing Premature Birth", the author, an RN, writes of how many NICU nurses she knows that had preemies.

    When did you deliver?
    I delivered at 36 weeks gestation after 16 straight wks of bedrest in and out of hospital. I also developed other pregnancy associated complications.

    Were you given a reason for your PTL?
    I was never given any type of reason or explanation. My child is healthy.

  7. by   JennieBSN
    Speaking as an L&D nurse, it's a well-known and documented fact that nurses and doctors have the highest rates of preterm labor than any other profession. Several of our nurses delivered early, as well as several of our doctors. Pre-eclampsia runs rampant amongst healthcare workers, too. Be good to yourselves if you can, guys. Some of our staff have gone so far as to apply for (and get) short term disability so that they could stay out of work when they were in their last trimester. You might want to consider this if money is an issue, and ESPECIALLY if you have a history of PTL. The high level of physical exertion, standing, constant walking, as well as dehydration (y'all KNOW nobody drinks nearly enough at work...especially you folks in critical care) all contribute. I suggest looking into the short term disability stuff if you can. It can be a life saver for your wallet AND your baby.
  8. by   dawngloves
    Well, there goes my therory that nurses in high acuity areas only have PTL.
    I wonder what the prevelance is amongst those in say, LTC facilites?

    The Pre E therory also surprises me. I agree about drinking water. I would think that a great deal of PTL amongst health care workers is caused by UTIs.
  9. by   Mumzy9697
    I need to read that acticle, i went PTL while working Dialysis, startedat 2 weeks, but the doctor poo-poo'd it, ended up changing MD. The next one stated to me"my daughter worked right up to delivery" she worked OB. I went into PTL while at work, the Charge nurse said"can't let you go, because of the Census" So finally the doctor told me NO more work(HELLO)she delivered 2 weeks early, was a Code white,weighed 5,14 but is just perfect today. with my second I stopped working, No PTL, 7lbs, perfect labor.I think depending on the physical stress/emotional stress and the person, not everyone can work this while pregant, Good luck and take care.
  10. by   dawngloves
    Here is a copy of the article printed in the American Journal of OB/GYN for those interested.

    Obstetrics

    Occupational fatigue and preterm premature rupture of membranes


    Objective: The aim of this study was to prospectively determine the
    relationship between occupational fatigue and spontaneous preterm delivery
    segregated into the etiologically distinct categories of spontaneous preterm
    labor, preterm premature rupture of membranes, and indicated preterm
    delivery.
    Study Design: A total of 2929 women with singleton pregnancies at 22 to 24
    weeks' gestation were enrolled in a multicenter (10 sites) Preterm
    Prediction Study. Patients reported the number of hours worked per week and
    answered specific questions designed to determine the following 5 sources of
    occupational fatigue described by Mamelle et al: posture, work with
    industrial machines, physical exertion, mental stress, and environmental
    stress. Fatigue was quantified (0-5 index) according to the number of these
    sources positively reported. Simple and Mantel-Haenszel 2 tests were used to
    test the univariate association and hypothesis of a linear trend between
    sources of occupational fatigue and spontaneous preterm delivery.
    Covariables were considered by multivariate logistic regression analysis.
    Women who did not work outside the home were considered separately from
    those who worked but did not report any sources of occupational fatigue.
    Results: Each source of occupational fatigue was independently associated
    with a significantly increased risk of preterm premature rupture of
    membranes among nulliparous women but not among multiparous women. The risk
    of preterm premature rupture of membranes increased (P = .002) with an
    increasing number of sources of occupational fatigue-not working outside the
    home, 2.1%; working but not reporting fatigue, 3.7%; working with 1 source
    of fatigue, 3.2%; working with 2 sources of fatigue, 5.2%; working with 3
    sources of fatigue, 5.1%; and working with 4 or 5 sources of fatigue, 7.4%.
    There was also a significant relationship (P = .01) between preterm
    premature rupture of membranes and an increasing number of hours worked per
    week among nulliparous women. Neither spontaneous preterm labor nor
    indicated preterm delivery was significantly associated with occupational
    fatigue among either nulliparous or multiparous women.
    Conclusion: The occupational fatigue index of Mamelle et al discriminated a
    group of nulliparous women at increased risk for preterm premature rupture
    of membranes. The relationship between preterm premature rupture of
    membranes and occupational fatigue or hours worked may provide guidelines
    according to which nulliparous women and their employers can be advised. (Am
    J Obstet Gynecol 2001;184:438-46.)
  11. by   Nacoya
    I recall reading in the article by "Moore,M & Comerford-Freda,M. (1998). Reducing preterm and low birth weight births: Still a nursing challenge..." that nurses are at greater risk for having premature infants. Maybe this is from a combination of stressors , ie., long hours on their feet, shift work and the emotional and physical stress.
    I hope this is helpful,
    All the best to you and take care.


  12. by   Q.
    I personally was not pregnant while working but 3 of my co-workers were: 2 out of the 3 had problems.
    One had PTL at 30 weeks, hyperemesis, had to be on terbutaline, bedrest. Returned to work at 35 weeks, delivered at 37.
    One had 2 miscarriages at 18-20 weeks.
    All while working at a busy Labor and Delivery unit of all places.

    Incidently, one staff member has had a seizure disorder all her life, has not had a seizure for 7 years, until last month. Seized right on the unit.
  13. by   Q.
    [QUOTE]Originally posted by dawngloves:
    [B]Well, there goes my therory that nurses in high acuity areas only have PTL.


    I would like to point out, that L&D is also considered a high acuity area. We may not get the nice ICU differential, but the acuity is very high. L & D is not all nice and cute and fun. Emotions run high and life and death is very real. A cord prolapse, a liver capsule that ruptures from HEELP syndrome, particulate meconium stained fluid, amniotic fluid emboli: these are all very life-threatening.
  14. by   dawngloves
    [quote]Originally posted by Susy K:
    [b]
    Originally posted by dawngloves:
    Well, there goes my therory that nurses in high acuity areas only have PTL.


    I would like to point out, that L&D is also considered a high acuity area. We may not get the nice ICU differential, but the acuity is very high. L & D is not all nice and cute and fun. Emotions run high and life and death is very real. A cord prolapse, a liver capsule that ruptures from HEELP syndrome, particulate meconium stained fluid, amniotic fluid emboli: these are all very life-threatening.
    Oh Susy ITA!! I was referring to the clinic RN.That was a surprise to me, and I'm sure it was because she was the only one there and was stressed out.
    I'm not sure where you live, but I am surprised you don't make a differential. L & D is considered a specialty area for the agency I work for and make the same as ICU nurses. Plus, you have to pay a higher insurance rate working in that area.
    About your co workers. I have heard of a great deal of L & D nurses that have PTL. I'm still waiting to hear about any Med/ Surg or LTC nurses.


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