Death and the dying patient, what experiences do you have? - page 3

My greatest fear as a new student nurse was how was I going to cope when I saw my first dead person? I had never even had a relative who had died nor been to many funerals. In the UK we don't... Read More

  1. Visit  ChaseZ profile page
    5
    I had a pretty steep learning curve when it came to death when I was an EMT. Before getting into medicine I had never really experienced death, I was fortunate enough that all my grandparents were still alive and well and I had never been to a funeral. I remember my first week on the truck we had 4 codes. First was a 12 day old infant dropped on his head by his mother (high on crack), next was a 17 year old drug OD; brain dead after a messy code, then a massive MI, and finally a 22 year old from a MVA with a traumatic aortic rupture; that code was just going through the motions. The physical death never really bothered me but the family memebers did. Especially the 17 y/o who was found at home, the parents were hysterical and the mother was screaming/crying. As far as the sick humor goes I have to agree, there is no way to survive dealing with death and dying everyday without having some type of coping mechanism and for many that is humor. Having said that, making comments about a patient on scene is totally disrespectful and unprofessional.
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  3. Visit  nursebaldeh profile page
    0
    Maternal morbidity and mortality in developing countries remains to be issue for concern. All hands on deck to prevent the catastrophic effects our woman and families all over. Prevention of major complications such as pregnancy induced hypertension(PIH), Pre Eclampsia and even Eclampsia, Antepartum and Postpartum Haemorrhages as well as puerperal Sepsis should be advocated.

    How can we prevent puerperal sepsis?
  4. Visit  lantanaRN profile page
    2
    Nov 3 by [COLOR=#003366]echoRNC711 Nov 3 by [COLOR=#003366]echoRNC711 A member since Sep '12 - from 'Bronx, NY, US'. echoRNC711 has '20' year(s) of nursing experience and specializes in 'Med/surg,Tele,CVRU,ASU,PACU,OR,Cardiac R'. Posts: 151 Likes: 333
    Awards:

    There are two great privileges in life to be present at a birth or a death. I consider it both an honor and a privilege to stand as a witness to a pt life as they transition past death into new life As a hospice nurse I truly agree and dailoy experience what you have posted. It can be a very spiritual peaceful experience for both the patient and the caregiver I feel truly blessed to be part of every one of my patient's final journey!
    echoRNC711 and madwife2002 like this.
  5. Visit  brownbook profile page
    1
    I love your article but am very confused. I completely agree with the lecturer. I have told families their loved one is dead.

    I would love some examples from you of your gentle terminology?

    It seems your one unique experience, which I don't doubt happened exactly as you said, and I don't doubt would have been best NOT to say "he is dead" under those circumstances, although I would have handled it exactly as you did. Has left you and us with nothing more to go on than use "gentle terminology."

    When you call families at home at 2:00 in the morning to tell them their loved one is dead, this would be an expected death of an elderly patient, what would you say?

    When you are sitting in a private room with family whose loved one, again elderly patient brought in by paramedics to ER, probably massive MI, probably dead when the paramedics got to the home. anyway what gentle terminology do you use?
    madwife2002 likes this.
  6. Visit  madwife2002 profile page
    0
    Brownbook,

    I would probably say I am really sorry but your 'family member' has died, which is a lot gentler that saying your family member is Dead.

    I am not afraid to say it but I was trying to portrait that I took the lecturer literally, which was a harsh way.

    I have had to inform a lot of people over the years and I never say the same thing it all depends on the circumstances.

    I understand what you are confused about, and thank you for pointing it out to me
  7. Visit  madwife2002 profile page
    0
    Quote from lantanaRN

    There are two great privileges in life to be present at a birth or a death. I consider it both an honor and a privilege to stand as a witness to a pt life as they transition past death into new life As a hospice nurse I truly agree and dailoy experience what you have posted. It can be a very spiritual peaceful experience for both the patient and the caregiver I feel truly blessed to be part of every one of my patient's final journey!
    I so totally agree with you, they are both privileges to be present at birth and death.
    I would love to be a hospice nurse, and I envy you your great job.
    When my mother passed away at a hospice, I was humbled by their kindness
  8. Visit  ElizabethGrant profile page
    0
    I don't think a family member should be told over the phone at any time. How do you verify they have the right to know and that you aren't violating privacy? As far as "gentle terminology" I would hope that this is another way of saying be compassionate. Culturally, I think it would depend, in America most people know without any confusion what passed away means. I would hate for someone to say to me "your dad is dead". How about in these situations, isn't it a physician's responsiblity? What do they say? Nurses are generally considered to have a better bedside manner and yet I have seen doctors tell people about the death of a loved one (I have worked general floor, transplant, newborns, and LTC) and they say something like "I'm sorry we did all we could but he did not survive". I think that is gentle. I think the distinction is the way it feels. If it is percieved as a slap in the face or as breaking it easily.
    As far as telling a person over the phone how would you feel if they rush to the facility only to be killed in a car accident or kill another because they are overly emotional?
  9. Visit  OCNRN63 profile page
    2
    The first time I saw someone who had died was when I was a senior in nursing school in my ED rotation. One day someone came by and asked if any of the students wanted to go to the morgue because an autopsy was being done. I went; all I remember is the woman was frail, elderly...and that's it.

    I saw lots of deaths when I worked in hospice. The only time I had a family member "freak out" was when a patient's granddaughter threw herself on the corpse and refused to get off.
    leslie :-D and madwife2002 like this.


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