Corporate/Business world Nursing?

  1. I've only been a nurse for about a year now so forgive me if I sound stupid (haha).
    I enjoy what I do (ICU), but I am the type who is always thinking about what else is out there. I've heard of certain non-clinical type jobs such as Case Management/working for insurance companies. Besides these, are there any 'corporate world' type jobs that welcome those with nursing degrees? I've thought about pharm rep type jobs but I dont think I would want to do sales. Can anyone give me any ideas? Again, I like where I'm at, I just like to know what else is out there, and right now I feel clueless. Thanks!
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  2. 16 Comments

  3. by   augigi
    I work for a medical device company which makes cardiac implantable devices. I started out of ICU -> Clinical Specialist role -> I'm now the manager of Medical Affairs. I write clinical trial protocols, teach the utilisation of the device to surgeons/nurses, attend conferences to present on the device, troubleshoot clinical issues, come up with evidence-based treatment guidelines.

    I've loved it, and make a good salary, but I'm probably going to leave in the next 6 - 9 months to go back to clinical.. I miss it after 3 years out!

    THere are tons of pharmaceutical and device companies which need clinical reps (rather than sales reps) - I would hate sales too.
  4. by   traumaRUs
    Another avenue might be case management for insurance companies.
  5. by   RunningWithScissors
    I work with a nurse who did UR for an insurance co....she loved the hours but hated the work. She said the calls were timed and there was a big timer on the wall counting up how long a caller was on hold, and these things were held against you.

    Also, meal and break times were strictly enforced to the minute, potty breaks were hard to get due to the call-time thing.

    She actually thought it was a relief to get back to the floor!
  6. by   outcomesfirst
    There are many jobs out there. Technology, pharma (device/drugs/trials/regulatory/planning), education, research, insurance (case management, record review, claim review, education planning, provider profiling, systems initiayion, development, market planning) all kinds of stuff to do with health care. Nurses are unique because of the transference of education and experience to many areas. For example - computer software is always being developed to improve health care. Nurses are in a unique position of knowing how hospitals, home health, clinics what ever work and can contribute practical and ideal insight/planning for development purposes. Another - Amazon sells healthcare equipment, they need someone to help design online catalog for what would make sense to a consumer - get a nurse . I've had many different roles (ADD) and some of the best have been through reading classifieds and networking. Good luck and keep looking!
    Last edit by outcomesfirst on Dec 11, '06 : Reason: spelling
  7. by   Katnip
    Every case management job I've seen insists on previous experience in case management.

    I guess some people are born case managers? Because companies around here sure don't seem to think they're made.
  8. by   outcomesfirst
    Quote from cyberkat
    Every case management job I've seen insists on previous experience in case management.

    I guess some people are born case managers? Because companies around here sure don't seem to think they're made.
    Learn all you can about case management (and the attached industry: managed care, workers comp, occupational, medicare, medicaid, is it illness specific - DM/COPD etc) - lots on the internet (see CMSA) or go to the local college/area ed center and look at books/mags. Tailor you resume to reflect your learning and goals. Set up the interview(s) - persistence pays, keep applying/calling, go in and wow them. They will hire you without experience - show them motivation. Some of the best CMs I ever hired were the ones without CM experience.
  9. by   rach_nc_03
    I work for a large cooperative nonprofit company that, among other things, offers health insurance to members. I do a lot of research on new drugs, new clinical practice guidelines, new disease info, trends in healthcare, etc, and design programs (preventive health education, disease management programs, etc.). I also write articles on some of the aforementioned topics for member publication. I have a lot of autonomy, I'm salaried (that can be good and bad), and I make twice what I made as a hospital nurse. I like it a lot.
  10. by   Katnip
    Quote from outcomesfirst
    Learn all you can about case management (and the attached industry: managed care, workers comp, occupational, medicare, medicaid, is it illness specific - DM/COPD etc) - lots on the internet (see CMSA) or go to the local college/area ed center and look at books/mags. Tailor you resume to reflect your learning and goals. Set up the interview(s) - persistence pays, keep applying/calling, go in and wow them. They will hire you without experience - show them motivation. Some of the best CMs I ever hired were the ones without CM experience.
    Thanks for the tips. I'm starting that stuff now anyway just in case.
  11. by   Insurance RN
    After many years of ICU nursing, I decided I needed less stress in my life and now work as an oncology case manager for an Insurance company. Yes it takes alot of work to learn the ropes, however it is well worth it. The company that I work for has now made it mandatory for all case managers to be certified. My best words of advice echo what outcomesfirst wrote, learn all you can and WOW them.
    Last edit by Insurance RN on Dec 11, '06
  12. by   Jesskanurse
    Ok... thank you very much for all the input so far. I do have one question though...what exactly IS case management? I honestly don't know. I like the idea of clinical sales better than pharm sales... but then again it's still sales.

    Basically I'm trying to figure out if I should stick with the Clinical route and go to PA or NP school, OR go business route and explore some of these avenues. Can anyone help guide me? Thanks!
  13. by   Mission
    I worked for an insurance company (before I went to nursing school) in the Quality Improvement department. The nurses there were responsible for auditing doctors medical records to insure they were meeting NCQA, IPRO, etc guidelines. They all said they liked the job when they we're traveling (it was local travel during the big yearly audit) but not as much when they had to be in the office all the time (too much big brother in the office). I know the year after I left they all got a 25% bonus.

    There is a forum on these boards for Quality Improvement nursing if you want to learn more about it. Risk management nursing is another area, usually you are investigating providers who have had multiple complaints or have failed an audit.
    Last edit by Mission on Dec 11, '06 : Reason: additional information.
  14. by   augigi
    Not sure what "clinical sales" is - if you meant my post, I was talking about acting as a clinical resource for products (drug/device etc) - there is NO sales involved, mostly training and troubleshooting.

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