Colors used to identify IV sets usage?

  1. Hi, everyone. Actually I'm not a Clinician but I'm very interested in solving some question and I'm sure you can help me.... ....here is the first one:

    I've seen sets for monitoring systems with different colors to identify the different lines(arterial, pulmonary... ). Is this also used for I.V. sets, I mean, are there colors to identify the sets for anesthesia, anticoagulants, etc. ???
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  2. 12 Comments

  3. by   Altra
    I've not seen this - IV tubing is all clear.. Differences in drip chambers/filters exist such as with blood tubing and vented tubing for meds in glass/non-collapsible containers (Nitro, Diprivan, etc.)

    I belive the IV catheters themselves now have standardized color coding in the US, according to the gauge size of the catheter. Is this what you're asking?
  4. by   jorogume
    Quote from MLOS
    I've not seen this - IV tubing is all clear.. Differences in drip chambers/filters exist such as with blood tubing and vented tubing for meds in glass/non-collapsible containers (Nitro, Diprivan, etc.)

    I belive the IV catheters themselves now have standardized color coding in the US, according to the gauge size of the catheter. Is this what you're asking?
    Yes, what I wanted to know is if there are Standardized color coding for IV sets (thanks to you I'm also improving my English :-) thanks.
  5. by   nursejohio
    Are you asking if the lines are colored for different solutions? For example, an ICU patient on heparin, propofol, NS and potassium with different colored tubing for each? The answer to that would be no. Tubing is tubing. I always label mine at the pump and at the site where it connects to the patient so I can keep my lines straight, but that's personal preference. Blood administration sets are obviously different, as are TPN lines, but everything else is run on regular tubing.
  6. by   jill48
    Quote from jorogume
    Hi, everyone. Actually I'm not a Clinician but I'm very interested in solving some question and I'm sure you can help me.... ....here is the first one:

    I've seen sets for monitoring systems with different colors to identify the different lines(arterial, pulmonary... ). Is this also used for I.V. sets, I mean, are there colors to identify the sets for anesthesia, anticoagulants, etc. ???
    That is a great idea.
  7. by   htrn
    the actual iv catheters are color coded at the hub - i.e. 24 guage/yellow, 22 guage/blue, 20 guage/pink, 18 guage/green, and 16 guage/gray. the tubing itself is all clear, but i will label each line with a piece of silk tape with the name of the drug and label each pump on the triple pumps with name of drug and rate.

    we are all so programed into 'knowing' what things are by their color, including meds. ie, i know that when i grab the baggie with the orange vials i am grabbing the 10mg/ml morphine - but the neonatal heparin accidents recently may have been in part because the drug company discontinued the concentration that was usually used, but used the same vial with the same colored label for the more concentrated dilution.

    just a little thought provoking, i thought.
  8. by   sister--*
    At one point one of our CRNAs showed us a colored epidural tubing that the CRNAs wanted to begin using so as not to cause confusion when many lines are running.

    Unfortunately, our facility won't purchase it. Instead their lines are hand labeled and can easily become a part of the jumble just like the rest.
  9. by   Ayrman
    In my former life as a Paramedic I did numerous critical care transfers that might involve as many as 5 IV lines for one patient, especially when we were running tPA. We could carry a maximum of 2 pumps, the rest were gravity flow. In order to keep lines seperate (add in BP hose, monitor wires, pulse ox, etc to the confusion, all leading back to one cubbyhole where everything was hung/strapped down) we used markers specially designed to color IV tubing without penetrating the plastic. This enabled us to trace lines back that might cease to flow, or for which the drip was finished or otherwise needed to be stopped and disconnected.

    The markers were ordered from a medical supply company - I disremember the name but they used Weeble/Lego People in their ads throughout their catalog if that helps - and had a cutout on the side so you could run the line through coloring it as you went. Saved a lot of frustration and time.

    Ayrman
    Last edit by Ayrman on Feb 13, '07 : Reason: speeling
  10. by   jannrn
    Our facility does us epidural tubing with a yellow stripe on it, the IV tubing is all just clear.
  11. by   chip193
    I'm color blind...so it matters not to me what color the tubing is!
  12. by   jorogume
    Thanks a lot for the feedback, everyone! :spin:

    So There is not an stardardized color coding for IV sets tubing except, for the TNP which normally has a yellow stripe. Identifying the line is base most of the time on individual preferences... Am I right??

    Hey Ayrman I liked your method of identifying using markers, thanks for the tip.
  13. by   AliRae
    We have a hospital-wide system to identify major classes of drugs that we might be running. We have label sheets that have a big one to go on the pump itself with the name of the med and a few little ones to wrap around the tubing at strategic points. For example, anywhere in our hospital that you go, insulin should be labeled with orange labels. Vasoactives are purple, and narcotics are pink. I like it because when I have 2 poles of pumps, I can find the one I'm looking for pretty quickly. Our epidural tubing is also yellow striped.
  14. by   Rabid Badger
    No colour coding on lines here. Most solutions can be programmed into our pumps and label themselves, but I also still label the bag, the tubing between the bag and the pump and the tubing at the entry points and any y-site or stopcock sites.

    Basically I label the crap out of my lines. Better safe than sorry.

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