cna in hospitals

  1. I have a question? I am a newly licensed unemployed cna. I want to work in pediatrics or in a ob unit. I was told that before an acute hospital would hire you had to have a years experience working in a nursing home. Can someone tell me if this is true. because I tried working in a nursing home and I just don't like that kind of work. I would like to know if I should even submit and application at an acute hospital. thanks
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   tillie1
    Originally posted by brettswife:
    <STRONG>I have a question? I am a newly licensed unemployed cna. I want to work in pediatrics or in a ob unit. I was told that before an acute hospital would hire you had to have a years experience working in a nursing home. Can someone tell me if this is true. because I tried working in a nursing home and I just don't like that kind of work. I would like to know if I should even submit and application at an acute hospital. thanks</STRONG>
    Brettswife, You don't say what state yu are in but believe me, in the Denver metro area you would be welcome at most acute care hospitals. ok, I guess I can't speak for any place but where I work but we do hire new cna's. We had a school that sent there cna students to our floor for clinicals this spring and our manage ENCOURAGED them to apply if they were interested in working with us. I htink someone gave you some poor advice!
  4. by   lpnandloveit1
    It couldn't hurt to apply
  5. by   fiestynurse
    A "licensed" CNA?
  6. by   brettswife
    I live in the state of nevada. And yes they call us licensed out here. It cost me $279.00 for the class and another $150.00 to the state board of nursing to apply for the certificate and to take a state board test. I went ahead and applied at 2 hospitals so I am just waiting for someone to call for an interview.
  7. by   fiestynurse
    So, it's a certificate, not really a license, but they call it a license? I am still confused? Anyway, you should be able to find a position in a hospital, without having to work in a nursing home first. CNAs are in such hot demand right now!! Good Luck!

    [ May 24, 2001: Message edited by: feistynurse ]
  8. by   moonshadeau
    some north eastern states call their aides licensed nursing assistants. I say submit the application. You have nothing to lose by submitting an application. Most places just look for someone warm and caring and that is RESPONSIBLE, meaning that they show up when they are supposed and do the work that they are depended on.
  9. by   Brown Suga
    Many of the hospitals in the valley are hiring CNAs to work. There are always ads in the newpapers for hospital and registries. The hospitals require you to have your license when applying for a position. The CNA's recieve a license number just like the RNs and LPNs. The CNA's are require to sit for a state broad exam which includes a written and practical. They are also require to renew their license every two years.
  10. by   fiestynurse
    I learn something new everyday, but I just don't understand this? Doesn't CNA stand for Certified Nursing Assistant. Why aren't they called LNAs, if they are licensed? It's no wonder that the general public gets confused. like, LPNs on the east coast, LVNs on the west coast. Well, now that I have thoroughly beaten this issue to death, I still wish you all the best!!

    [ May 24, 2001: Message edited by: feistynurse ]

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