Can someone explain ambulatory care....

  1. center to me.... granted I could ask them myself... but I'm scheduled for a breast reduction on 3/16 and instead of actually going to the hospital, I guess they are going to do it right there at the clinic in the ambulatory center...

    I feel a little stupid that I don't know exactly what this is (aside of outpatient), but I thought I'd ask here in case any of you are nurses in a similar place...

    Will I be getting as good of care as compared to if I were in a hospital setting?? And what if something were to go wrong??? How do they deal with a situation like that??

    I was planning on asking the scheduler when she mentioned it, but I was just kind of confused at the time... and now I'm getting a bit nervous...

    Thanks for any help you can offer... I will be calling them myself eventually... I just thought it might be nice if I knew a bit more about it before I go asking a bunch of questions...
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  2. 9 Comments

  3. by   TazziRN
    Ambulatory surgery is same-day surgery......you go in in the morning, have the surgery, and go home that same day.
  4. by   mekrn
    Ambulatory Surgery Centers are fine as long as you are in good health. They are not for people with complicated medical histories or are high risk in any way. In the event of emergency, they would call 911 and transport you to the hospital. If you are not comfortable, just let your surgeon know that you would rather have the procedure in the hospital.

    By the way, never be afraid to ask questions of your physician.
  5. by   luvmy3kids
    Thank you. I kind of figured that was the case, but no one really explained it to me there and I had never heard of it before. Plus I thought it to be odd that it wasn't at the hospital. Thanks again.
  6. by   caliotter3
    This probably does not apply in your situation but for future consideration: I was sent to an amb care ctr for a diagnostic procedure and upon check-in they refused my advanced directive. Because of circumstances, I did not have the option to cancel and look elsewhere. I also had a surgical procedure which was to have been done in the day surg part of a hosp but I ended up on a ward b/c it turned into an emerg situation. I didn't get a chance to provide my advanced directive. I paid a law firm close to a grand to have my advanced directive drawn up (later on I figured out where I could have gotten the precise forms myself) and so I became a little concerned that my wishes would not be followed. I intend to do more detailed exploration into the subject in the future, whenever I am faced with decisions concerning anything considered elective. Since you mention kids in your screen name I hope that you have considered medical power of attny and advanced directives as part of your important papers now. You never know what might transpire, heaven forbid (even for close calls). Good luck with your procedure. We all hope all goes well with you.
  7. by   antidote
    Quote from solidaritynurse
    Ambulatory Surgery Centers are fine as long as you are in good health. They are not for people with complicated medical histories or are high risk in any way. In the event of emergency, they would call 911 and transport you to the hospital. If you are not comfortable, just let your surgeon know that you would rather have the procedure in the hospital.

    By the way, never be afraid to ask questions of your physician.
    I agree. They normally don't perform huge complex surgeries as these places (like heart transplants or something of that nature) so if something goes terribly wrong they'll transport you.

    As posted above as well: you are normally in-and-out of these places. I don't think you have anything you worry about.

    Good luck with you're surgery!
  8. by   RunnerRN
    The only bad experience I've had with an ambulatory surg center was a woman we got in the ED who'd had breast implants placed earlier that day, and somehow managed to also get double pneumos. They didn't attempt transport for at least an hour after she began having distress (after awakening) - gave her multiple alb nebs and other txs. The pneumos enlarged significantly - pt was intubated en route, and we placed bilateral chest tubes.
    Like I said, that's the only bad thing I've really heard, and have heard lots of good experiences from healthy people who had elective procedures. It seems to be more customer service oriented too! (So you're a client not a patient )
  9. by   Katnip
    My daughter recently had surgery in an ambulatory center. It turned out great.

    If I thought for one second they weren't safe, no way would I let my baby go there. Even though she's 16 and no baby.
  10. by   luvmy3kids
    Quote from caliotter3
    This probably does not apply in your situation but for future consideration: I was sent to an amb care ctr for a diagnostic procedure and upon check-in they refused my advanced directive. Because of circumstances, I did not have the option to cancel and look elsewhere. I also had a surgical procedure which was to have been done in the day surg part of a hosp but I ended up on a ward b/c it turned into an emerg situation. I didn't get a chance to provide my advanced directive. I paid a law firm close to a grand to have my advanced directive drawn up (later on I figured out where I could have gotten the precise forms myself) and so I became a little concerned that my wishes would not be followed. I intend to do more detailed exploration into the subject in the future, whenever I am faced with decisions concerning anything considered elective. Since you mention kids in your screen name I hope that you have considered medical power of attny and advanced directives as part of your important papers now. You never know what might transpire, heaven forbid (even for close calls). Good luck with your procedure. We all hope all goes well with you.
    Thank you for your good advice. My husband and I have a Will and Trust and I do have a health care directive as well. HOPEFULLFY it won't come to that... but believe me, I have considered the possibilty.

    While in the scheme of things, this is considered "elective", for me... it's really medically necessary. I have horrible back pain, neck pain, headaches. I have trouble exercising because of their size, and I have breast tissue that has grown under the axillary portion of my arm that has to be removed. It is extremely painful. Thankfully it is covered by insurance. I just hope I get in and out of there like you have all said I should....
  11. by   caliotter3
    You are so lucky that your insurance is covering this! Again, hope all goes well!

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