Can anyone explain MSSA vs MRSA to me?

  1. I have a patient on MSSA precautions. Methicillin Sensitive Staph Aureus. I don't get it. Ok it's sensitive to Methicillin so what's the problem? I've googled with no luck!
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  2. 4 Comments

  3. by   ShaunES
    "MRSA may also be known as oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (ORSA) and multiple-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, while non-methicillin resistant strains of S. aureus are sometimes called methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) if an explicit distinction must be made."

    Sounds logical to me, maybe.

    Here's google scholar articles on MSSA

    http://scholar.google.com/scholar?q=...r=&btnG=Search

    And with no acronym.

    http://scholar.google.com/scholar?q=...r=&btnG=Search
    Last edit by ShaunES on Feb 17, '07
  4. by   DutchgirlRN
    Quote from ShaunES
    "MRSA may also be known as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, while non-methicillin resistant strains of S. aureus are sometimes called methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) if an explicit distinction must be made."

    Sounds logical to me, maybe.
    Still makes no sense. It's more like an oxymoron.:crash_com
  5. by   CritterLover
    Quote from dutchgirlrn
    i have a patient on mssa precautions. methicillin sensitive staph aureus. i don't get it. ok it's sensitive to methicillin so what's the problem? i've googled with no luck!

    i've always seen mssa used to designate a staph infection as not mrsa. meaning no precautions needed, other than the usual (standard) ones.

    could it be that someone who designated the need for precautions was confused?
  6. by   DutchgirlRN
    Quote from critterlover
    i've always seen mssa used to designate a staph infection as not mrsa. meaning no precautions needed, other than the usual (standard) ones.

    could it be that someone who designated the need for precautions was confused?
    now that makes alot of sense. thanks!

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