Can a short person be a nurse? - page 3

Hello Everyone! I have an unusual question to ask regarding nursing. I've wanted to be a nurse since I was in grade school. After high school, marriage and family obligations took over and I... Read More

  1. by   11:11
    My first boss is 4'11".


    Shes an excellent nurse. Not always easy to pair up with. I should have bought her a pair of platform shoes.

    Make sure you know where your foot stool is. The unit Im on now has them all over. I even like them for codes-

    11
  2. by   loulou10484
    my study buddy through nursing school was 4'8'' and she did just fine, I also work with a nurse who is around that height also, she does fine, she makes adjustments to what she needs to do and if she needs help she just asks.
  3. by   happthearts
    I will never forget the nurse I worked with she had to be only 4.6 or so This lady nurse one time ,hopped up on the bed and did CPR on this guy ,she was totally amazeing with the compressions .She could put her all into it since she could be right on the bed .To the side of the PT. Awesome nurse I will never forget her.Her Pt care was great with the Pts .
  4. by   MryRose
    Thank you all so much!!!!

    This is really encouraging to me as I am in my last semester of pre-reqs and can apply to ADN program in the Fall.

    I actually would love to end up working in the ER... I love the adrenaline flow, multi-tasking etc. Someone asked me what I would do in a code about compressions and I told them I probably would end up on the bed next to the patient too. Now I see that it's possible. I just hope remember to jump off if they have to shock them..... oooh that would hurt!:uhoh21:

    Love the posts.... you guys are making my day!!!

    Thanks and Hugs!

    MaryRose
  5. by   MamaTheNurse
    I worked one day where the staffing was me, one other RN, 2 LPN's, 2 CNA's and a Unit Clerk and I was the tallest at 5'3! I also know an awesome ER nurse who is only 4'10 and she worked as a nurse/paramedic for years (she fit best in the limited room in the back of an ambulance rig!!)
    you'll be fine!!! go nuts!!!
  6. by   Gompers
    Quote from Roland
    I saw a special on Discovery Health a few years ago about "little people". In any case ONE of the featured individuals was an orthopedic surgeon (maybe four feet tall).
    I saw that special - very interesting!!!

    I'm 4'10" and work in NICU. It's a bit easier because I don't have heavy patients to lift or move. Sometimes if a baby is on a radiant warmer bed, I'll grab a stepstool because it's hard to get an overhead view of them at my height. And I'm always having people reach supplies from the top shelf. I get a lot of razzing, but it's all in love. I hope.
  7. by   MryRose
    Quote from Gompers
    I saw that special - very interesting!!!

    I'm 4'10" and work in NICU. It's a bit easier because I don't have heavy patients to lift or move. Sometimes if a baby is on a radiant warmer bed, I'll grab a stepstool because it's hard to get an overhead view of them at my height. And I'm always having people reach supplies from the top shelf. I get a lot of razzing, but it's all in love. I hope.
    Nice to talk to a tiny like me! I am also considering NICU because of the lifting issue too. I figure one of the high adrenaline rotations will be perfect and I'll know during clinical rotations.

    I get lots of razzing in school, and I love it! At our height we have to have a giant sense of humor!:chuckle

    Thanks so much for posting. You all are great!

    Hugs!
    MaryRose
  8. by   DelightRN
    At my very first nursing job, I worked with a fellow new grad who was a little person. She was less than 4 feet tall. She did a GREAT job. She required a little more help with lifting than the normal staff person, because she was so short in stature, and she was a tiny slip of a thing. Besides that, though, she did a marvelous job adapting to an environment that did not adapt to her. I can't imagine how difficult it must be functioning in an environment where everything is designed for someone much taller.
  9. by   pediatriclpn
    I'm only 5ft, and only problem I ever had was when I worked LTC, and people wouldn't put the beds back down in low position. Love peds (though not working now, back injury from slip and fall) and the kids love that I am close to their height!
  10. by   MryRose
    Quote from DelightRN
    At my very first nursing job, I worked with a fellow new grad who was a little person. She was less than 4 feet tall. She did a GREAT job. She required a little more help with lifting than the normal staff person, because she was so short in stature, and she was a tiny slip of a thing. Besides that, though, she did a marvelous job adapting to an environment that did not adapt to her. I can't imagine how difficult it must be functioning in an environment where everything is designed for someone much taller.
    Wow that is really amazing. I will certainly keep her in mind when I am faced with a challenge.

    I guess it's all about the environment you are used to.... it just seems normal to look up for everything. Today I was on a stepstool cleaning and was about a foot off the ground... and I was thinking how easy everything would be to reach from this height. But then, everything low is easier for me to reach than others. Plus I don't have to bend as far to pick up things that drop! lol :chuckle
  11. by   MryRose
    A question for you shorties.... how do you reach the IV poles. That is one thing I have kinda been worried about.

    I guess I can always take along a stepstool, but am wondering can they be lowered?

    Thanks,
    MaryRose
  12. by   Grace Oz
    G'day MaryRose, I'm also one of life's gifts to the planet.... a SHORTIE!!

    Here in Oz we have adjustable IV poles that you can alter the height, so I'm guessing you'd have them up/over there too.

    The only negative, being short, in my experience as a nurse, has been being on the "short end of the stick" when it came to lifting. I'm talking in relation to the earlier days in my career. "Back in those days", we didn't have the advantage of "no lifting" policies as there is in todays nursing workforce. And more often than not, no machines either. I often lifted with another, taller, nurse, and ended up copping the load. Or, the lift was a disaster, lopsided etc.
    All these years later, (I'm talking 37 years!!) I have a "back problem", (WHAT nurse doesn't??!!!)

    I became very adept at scampering up shelves in order to reach things on the higher levels too! Wasn't always the wisest thing to do. Glad most of the shelving was attached to the wall!

    Overall though, being short hasn't really disadvantaged me too greatly either professionally or personally. It's just how I am, I've never known any different, and so I've always managed to find a way to still accomplish what I wanted/needed to.

    BEST WISHES on your chosen career, and I wish you many many happy years in the profession of nursing.
    Cheers....
    Grace
  13. by   Gompers
    Quote from MryRose
    A question for you shorties.... how do you reach the IV poles. That is one thing I have kinda been worried about.

    I guess I can always take along a stepstool, but am wondering can they be lowered?
    Like I said above, usually people help me out a lot when I can't reach stuff. BUT when I'm taking down and putting up IVs, people LOOOOOVE to sit and watch me struggle. They're not being mean - they just LOOOOOOVE to see the kind of gymnastics I have to do in order to reach those high hooks. I'll step on stuff, like the bottom of the pole if it's on wheels. Or I'll tip the whole thing over so I can reach the top. Usually there's an adjustment knob on them to lower the hooks a little bit, so I can JUST reach them. One time, I wrestled with an IV pole for a good 2-3 minutes, eventually stepping on the bottom and jumping up so I could grab the top, then I hung on with one hand and hung the bag with the other, with my feet momentarily suspended in mid air, slam-dunk style.

    A nearby coworker had tears in her eyes when I was done, and thanked me for the best laugh she'd had in weeks.

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