blood transfusion - page 3

by nextdoorguy

4,131 Views | 30 Comments

when do you use leukodepleted blood versus untreated blood? what is the difference and what are technology risk? For example, in patients with anemia or for OR?... Read More


  1. 0
    Where I work it is leuko-reduced pre-storage. In Canada and Europe I think they do this by law. In the US it is only done by request or each institution can decide if they want all products to to be leuko reduced. last I heard it is not standard across the US. I will check into to it and see what I can find. it would be found in the AABB technical manual ,which I do not have a copy. So you blood bank may actually only accept this kind of blood and you may not even no it. it is really good to know especially if you work in an area in which frequent blood products are administered. I personally have seen a reduction in transfusion related reactions because we do this.

    I have to study this all of this to pass the CRNI test and when you star tlooking at the material it quite extensive. I never even knew what TRALI was and never even heard of it until I started reading about blood products and potential reactions.
  2. 0
    sorry for the late reply. this isnt an assignment. it happened here in my workplace, this homecare center in india. the order was to transfuse leukodepleted blood to this old guy who has been in our unit for quite some time. the blood unit was divided into two to prevent congestion i guess. this guy also has thalassemia. the blood came it was checked by the doctor. it was checked by the nurse and co nurse. it was hooked as side drip. later that we realized that it was not reduced with wbc. what harm would it have done to the patient. nothing happened to him though.
  3. 0
    Why is it so wrong for a student to get an answer here?
  4. 0
    there was a time when we asked questions and it was a nice discussion of opinion. now it's all is this an assignment??
  5. 2
    Quote from squatmunkie_RN
    Why is it so wrong for a student to get an answer here?
    The problem is that too many students come to AN and say "my pt is a 58 yr old male with COPD. What is my priority nursing diagnosis?" or "how is A fib related to CHF."

    In other words, they either don't do any work for their own assignment or they put very little thought into it before they come here and ask someone else to give them the answer.

    I have never seen a student turned away here...they are just asked to put some thought into their assignment and give us some of their ideas before they are directed toward the right answer. What are they going to learn if someone on here just says "here is your answer" rather than having the student think out the answer?
    GrnTea and netglow like this.
  6. 1
    Yes, and some students clearly do not pay attention in their pre-req science classes. These are the ones who can't figure out how to google either, LOL. This topic came right up in a google search. Or, more likely, they can google, but can't understand the linked information BECAUSE they almost failed their science prereqs or cheated all the way through. Soon folks, you do run into problems, big problems...

    Maybe if the OP had been more specific to the case at first, and not asked what could be answered on a simple google search.
    GrnTea likes this.
  7. 1
    Quote from squatmunkie_RN
    Why is it so wrong for a student to get an answer here?
    Again, a question that doesn't really need an answer, as it bespeaks an intability to think of one in the first place. Why wouldn't people who know far more than the student asking a question be willing to leap in and rescue with the answer, even if it is for homework?

    Innumerable times you will see someone on AN who cares enough to spend their valuable time patiently helping students because s/he finds it personally rewarding to help future practitioners of our profession gain the knowledge and thinking skills they'll need to be good nurses. Alas, leading a student through guided discovery is is not the same as "giving a student an answer."

    Sometimes the answer isn't merely a fact, but a way of analyzing a question or problem -- the old "critical thinking" that is irreplaceable in nursing. Students have to learn that too, because without it they will not be able to practice.

    P.S.: "Critical thinking" doesn't mean "thinking about criticizing" in the way most people think. Look it up.
    psu_213 likes this.
  8. 0
    this is my dilemma
    Quote from nextdoorguy
    sorry for the late reply. this isnt an assignment. it happened here in my workplace, this homecare center in india. the order was to transfuse leukodepleted blood to this old guy who has been in our unit for quite some time. the blood unit was divided into two to prevent congestion i guess. this guy also has thalassemia. the blood came it was checked by the doctor. it was checked by the nurse and co nurse. it was hooked as side drip. later that we realized that it was not reduced with wbc. what harm would it have done to the patient. nothing happened to him though.
  9. 1
    You may have had a wbc reduction filter on the tubing if you use specific ones for transfusion.

    WBCs job = attack foreign materials

    Transfused donor WBCs will attack the patient, but are not replenished by marrow and killed off by the patient's immune system.

    If the patient is immunocompromised/elderly/blah blah .... well i think you get the picture

    There is also the potential that a normal immune system wont recognize donor WBCs as foreign due to genetic similarities.

    In your case, leukoreduction was a preventative measure and if nothing happened then all is well.
    nextdoorguy likes this.
  10. 0
    leukocyte filtered is what we use when the order is for RBC's. We no longer use whole blood. Being filtered helps lower the risk for TRALI.


Top