A Patient's Perspective - To all of the Nurses at allnurses.com - page 4

To all of the Nurses at AllNurses.com, Of course I should start with some basic background info. I have dealt with Crohn's disease since 1989 when I was 17 years old. I've had some rough times... Read More

  1. by   1056chris
    I am so glad you wrote this. I have been a nurse for quite some time. Mostly med-surg, but have bounced around different units. Unfortunately , I am ashamed to say that some of my colleges think they know whether a patient is in pain or not. This especially true of a patient who comes in frequently with a chronic condition like yours.
    Everybody's pain is different, and everybody acts different when they are in pain. Not everyone cries, some people talk on the phone or pace. This is your body and you know when you need something and when they stick you too many times. I am the nurse that asks your pain level but also comes back when another pain med can be given and asks "do you need anything for pain" Don't be afraid to say "get a nurse from the ER or Critical care Unit to come I am a very hard stick" this can be done. These nurses often times put more IV's in and under stressful conditions and are more experienced. You might have to wait a little while but it could be worth it. When I started nursing there was an IV team. Many things have changed since those days as I am sure you are well aware.
    Don't blame yourself for getting the general surgeon rather than a GI specialist, he should have known better and been more aseptic in his technique. Nobody wants to be in the hospital, especially for as long as you have. I hope you are feeling better. Thank you for opening the eyes and ears of nurses everywhere!
  2. by   liss0815
    Thank you so much for reminding me Why I became a nurse. You see, I have Crohn's disease also. And although I wanted to be a nurse prior to being diagnosed, after I spent a month in the hospital, I knew it was where I belonged. It took many medications, years of being sick and a lot of determination to go back to school, but I did it. And I couldn't be happier. Yes... there are really hard days, but I have figured out how to reduce stress and listen to my body. Although I hope you never are hospitalized again, I hope that if you are, I am your nurse. I would be proud to be so.
  3. by   newnurse50plus
    Thank you very much for sharing
  4. by   sleepingbeauty1651
    It's moments like this, that we really realize that as nurses, we are truly appreciated!!! Thanks you for your wonderful note of appreciation. It is sad that you had to go through so much pain and suffering, it was also nice to know that you had someone, a nurse, even family for support. Wishing you all the best for 2016.
  5. by   marienm
    Thank you so much for your thoughtful post! I wish you the very best as you continue healing! And in that light, I hope the following is completely irrelevant to you for the rest of your life, but figured I'd put it out there:

    Regarding drawing blood cultures at 0100- in my hospital, when a patient newly meets "potential sepsis criteria" (2 or more of: high heart rate, high respiratory rate, high or very low white blood cell count, high temperature), we have to notify the MD and if there's no other discernable cause for the symptoms, we're expected to get blood cultures drawn and antibiotics started within a very short timeframe. (The cultures need to be drawn before the abx get started so we don't kill off the offending organism.) AND, the cultures--2 different sets--have to be drawn through the skin & not from a line like a PICC. So...it's possible that's why you had to endure it at such an unpleasant hour! (We also do re-draw cultures after several days of antibiotics to see whether they're working, and if that were the case there would be no reason I know of to do it at 0100 other than we draw most daily labs overnight anyway. They have to grow for a few days before producing final results, so it's not like the MD would be expecting to see them the next morning.)

    But, again, I hope this is never information you have to think about for one more minute!

    (Nurses- I know the sepsis criteria has just changed, but this post reflects the old standards. Not sure how our procedure is going to change.)
  6. by   AnonBoston
    I am finding myself a bit overwhelmed at the reactions I've gotten to this post. It did not enter my mind that my thanking all of you, would turn into you all thanking me! What a wonderful circle of gratitude this has become, it's all coming back around to each of us. Being a nurse just strikes me as such a dedicated, un-selfish, and compassionate role to play in a world that is way too full of sickness and pain. It's a really personal situation you're suddenly thrown into with people you don't even know. And although I did have several awesome guy nurses, it was always a bit more comfortable to have another woman with me on a shift. Certain things happen that only another woman can truly understand, and most of the time that's all I need to say..."well, you're a woman too, you get it, right? It just feels kinda..." and getting the head nod back. They get it.

    I realize a lot of this might sound a bit pretentious maybe, but it's just how I feel. It blows my mind that if I crap myself or throw up on the bed, two women with smiles and "it's okay"s will soon be along to take care of me and the mess I've just made. At my lowest, most embarrassed, freezing, sleep deprived, crying state...you're just there. The level of caring and compassion it takes to do this for people, to me is immeasurable.

    So again thank you everyone for the circle of gratitude we have all created here, and for all of the comments. As I read them I was amazed at how much the internet can help total strangers reach each other on some fairly deep levels. You are all so kind to have replied.
  7. by   sarbo1010
    thank you.
  8. by   noblek
    Thank you so much for your Encouraging words! Thoughts like yours that are shared help us so much in our daily work. Praying for your continued health!
  9. by   Horseshoe
    Another day...yet another failed IV. They usually last 3 days. Then the vein collapses, and I get stuck 4 or 5 more times before a picc line is decided upon.
    I'm wondering if hospital policy explains this. Your IVs may not have actually "failed" every single time this happened, but the hospital policy may have dictated changing out peripheral IVs every 72-96 hours.

    Another point: you mentioned getting a foley cath "while awake." That is actually standard unless the patient is having surgery and it can be started once the patient is sedated or fully "asleep." Hopefully your nurse was skilled and discomfort was minimized.

    And finally: I'm so glad you had nurses who were able to stay by your side as requested on those occasions you described in your posts. But unfortunately, the nurse to patient ratios have become an increasingly severe problem. A nurse nowadays may really wish she could "stay by your side," but unfortunately, if she has too many other patients, she will not have that luxury. Trust me, that is just as frustrating to a caring nurse as it is to the patient.

    You sound like you have been through a lot. I'm glad you got excellent care, I am grateful for your kind words about nurses, and I sincerely hope you are finished with these terrible exacerbations of your condition!!!!
  10. by   Horseshoe
    PS-I was late to this thread because I figured it would be yet another litany of complaints about the poor nursing care you received. We get a lot of those here. Some of course are completely valid. Others are simply a reflection of the high nurse to patient ratio I mentioned above. When nurses have too many patients, the patients do not get the quality of care they deserve and that the nurse truly desires to deliver.

    Thanks for writing about the good as well as the bad!!
  11. by   HopefulRN7
    Day made. Thank you for that.
    Many, many positive vibes sent your way!
  12. by   iluvivt
    Please know that not all nurses dislike what they do.I have been a nurse for 35 years and I learned as a young nurse that even the smallest of things we do to help others matters! I am an IV specialist and place IVS and PICCS and I do know how my skill level is so very appreciated by patients and those requesting my help. I have worked incredibly hard to make certain I know exactly what I am doing and that I am highly skilled so that I can help others just like you! My dad said to me a few years ago....."iluvivt have you ever stopped to think of just how many people you have helped in your life".That is something to be proud of! I know how special nurses are and I wish more realized how even what seems routine to them is so terribly important to those needing it! Thank you for rattling our cages and I hope you are feeling well now!
  13. by   Horseshoe
    Quote from iluvivt
    Please know that not all nurses dislike what they do.I have been a nurse for 35 years and I learned as a young nurse that even the smallest of things we do to help others matters! I am an IV specialist and place IVS and PICCS and I do know how my skill level is so very appreciated by patients and those requesting my help. I have worked incredibly hard to make certain I know exactly what I am doing and that I am highly skilled so that I can help others just like you! My dad said to me a few years ago....."iluvivt have you ever stopped to think of just how many people you have helped in your life".That is something to be proud of! I know how special nurses are and I wish more realized how even what seems routine to them is so terribly important to those needing it! Thank you for rattling our cages and I hope you are feeling well now!
    As someone who was only ever just "okay" at starting IVs, I really respect the nurses who are so good at this. I always joke that my boss could start an IV in the dark. It actually wouldn't surprise me.

    Kudos to you. You're damn right you have helped a lot of people. Saving patients from those extra sticks and potential complications from same is really a valuable talent.

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