Endoscopy nursing interview

  1. 0
    Hi!

    I am an experienced critical care RN. I have an interview in a couple days for Endoscopy. I'm interested in the position because I have seen many completed at the bedside in the critical care setting. I have been trained in conscious sedation nursing.

    What are the responsibilities of an endo RN / what are the most common cases of patients? What are the attributes that are important for an endo RN? If there are any other kinds of questions on my behalf that will be brought up on my behalf, please tell me.

    Thanks,
    Kelly
  2. 8 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    i'm jealous

    good luck

    put a lock, vs,sedation,recovery

    esophageal varices,ulcers,esophageal dilatation

    to work independently
  4. 0
    Quote from Kiwi
    Hi!

    I am an experienced critical care RN. I have an interview in a couple days for Endoscopy. I'm interested in the position because I have seen many completed at the bedside in the critical care setting. I have been trained in conscious sedation nursing.

    What are the responsibilities of an endo RN / what are the most common cases of patients? What are the attributes that are important for an endo RN? If there are any other kinds of questions on my behalf that will be brought up on my behalf, please tell me.

    Thanks,
    Kelly
    It really depends on the institution. If you are in a community hospital you are looking at EGD's, Colonoscopy and ERCP (maybe EUS). If you are in a tertiary center it gets a lot more complicated. In our center we have two RN's. One handles the sedation and the other helps with the procedure. You have to know how to set up and trouble shoot the equipment. Ideally you won't have to do this the first day. Mostly in our center they want to know if you can assess and sedate as well as recover. The technical stuff they will teach you.

    Also a lot of community hospitals do pain (injections), TEE and bronch in the endoscopy center. Not too much different.

    David Carpenter, PA-C
  5. 0
    edited
    Last edit by GIRN on May 25, '07
  6. 0
    Quote from core0
    It really depends on the institution. If you are in a community hospital you are looking at EGD's, Colonoscopy and ERCP (maybe EUS). If you are in a tertiary center it gets a lot more complicated. In our center we have two RN's. One handles the sedation and the other helps with the procedure. You have to know how to set up and trouble shoot the equipment. Ideally you won't have to do this the first day. Mostly in our center they want to know if you can assess and sedate as well as recover. The technical stuff they will teach you.

    Also a lot of community hospitals do pain (injections), TEE and bronch in the endoscopy center. Not too much different.

    David Carpenter, PA-C
    I am a Med/Surg nurse-no experience in sedation and recovery. How do i even get started in transitioning into GI nursing. Thanks!
  7. 0
    Go Nightingale. Very good question. I had worked bedside nursing, 11 pm to 7 am for 17 years, was getting just a little tired of that!!!!! I simply asked the charge nurse from our out-patient surgery-GI department if they were hiring. That they all knew me certainly helped. I became moderate sedation certified after I transferred there. (And know nothing about GI nursing!)

    If I were newish to a hospital and wanted a change??? I don't know. It doesn't hurt to simply apply if there is a GI clinic in your hospital. Even if they are not hiring right now present yourself as intelligent and eager to be a GI nurse. Ask where you can get moderate sedation certification. Ask or Google when GI seminars are in your area. Ask if you can shadow a GI nurse on your days off. Get to know the people in the GI department. If your patient is scheduled for a GI procedure on your day off ask your manager and the patient if you can watch the procedure.
  8. 0
    Sorry, typo, I "knew" nothing about GI nursing, not know nothing!!!!!!
  9. 0
    PS you will need ACLS along with moderation sedation certification.
  10. 0
    Quote from brownbook
    Go Nightingale. Very good question. I had worked bedside nursing, 11 pm to 7 am for 17 years, was getting just a little tired of that!!!!! I simply asked the charge nurse from our out-patient surgery-GI department if they were hiring. That they all knew me certainly helped. I became moderate sedation certified after I transferred there. (And know nothing about GI nursing!)

    If I were newish to a hospital and wanted a change??? I don't know. It doesn't hurt to simply apply if there is a GI clinic in your hospital. Even if they are not hiring right now present yourself as intelligent and eager to be a GI nurse. Ask where you can get moderate sedation certification. Ask or Google when GI seminars are in your area. Ask if you can shadow a GI nurse on your days off. Get to know the people in the GI department. If your patient is scheduled for a GI procedure on your day off ask your manager and the patient if you can watch the procedure.
    Thanks so much for your enlightning reply brownbook! You sound like a very positive and energetic person. I will certainly begin looking into all of your suggestions. Best wishes!


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