Orlando Nursing Pay ? Anyone heard anything good? - page 2

I hear its good .. I hear its bad.. I hear they dont pay state taxes so its FABULOUS.. then I hear the cost of living sucks there so the tax break isnt worth it. Any thoughts guys? Thanks a bundles. Were talking MED-SURG /... Read More

  1. 8
    Quote from Airbrushguy
    Well I googled the Salarys in Orlando and they say $63k is the average ... so I dont think I believe the " $19 per hour" base comment. And Im not sure how there is such a big differential comparatively via the state tax savings? Evidently Floridians do nto pay State Taxes.. but Im trying to figure out how that translates via a salary comparison.
    Are you going to believe a online resource that supports business interests, or the people that have actually live, work and breathe there?

    In 1993, when I started as an RN at a central Florida hospital (that now recently acquired magnet status), my base pay rate was 12.50 an hour for team leading UAP and maybe one LPN for up to 19 patients on a unit that cared for predominantly fresh postop pts.

    Said hospital was unable to find staff to work with them, so reformed and sought and attained magnet status. Guess what, the pay rate is so poor, they STILL can't stay staffed, in an era when there are tons of new RNs seeking jobs, and several nursing schools in the immediate area.

    One day when I inquired about the poor pay, I received an answer echoed by many other poor paying FL hospitals, "This is Florida, you get paid in sunshine".

    I spent years trying to get Visa, my student loans, TECO, etal to accept some sunshine for payment for bills - lord knows that I do not need it. For some reason, they don't bite on the "paid in sunshine" transaction.

    PS. I am a native Floridian, that traveled in the East coast. As of 10 monthes ago, I finally settled in the mid Atlantic area, with Boston as a second choice. Upon arriving here, my base pay rate increased by more than $10/hr, my pt ratio decreased substantially, my stress level dropped, and I got treated much better by the MDs, management, HR and my pts.

    I also don't get the seasonal continual low census in the off season, that cuts down on your pay check, and PTO that is so common in Florida. Nor the killer, work you to death and understaffing that accompanies the snowbird season, when the hospitals put beds in the halls with partitions around them and fill them.

    11 monthes ago, I was an underpaid, unhealthy wretch, who rarily got a break in shift, and could never give my pts the care that they deserved and needed because upper management never allowed for enough staff to adequately cover the floor. At least once per month or two, some nurse was being called in to give a deposition.

    Paying a minimal state income tax is minor compared to that. And even the record 80 some odd inches of snow up here has not dissuaded me. I recently bought an AWD car (which courtesy of my pay here I can now afford) to help manage. The accomodations here for staying over on snow days are much more comfortable than the FL accomodations for staying over for hurricanes.

    Also remember that state income tax serves a purpose - to pay for services that the state provides. That money has to come from somewhere. And since the Florida constitution (I believe) bars state income tax, and it is highly unlikely that any FL legislator is bucking for punishment at the polls as to attempt to tamper with that, that means taxes and fees (mainly property taxes have to make up the shortfall. You will make up the difference that you "save" not paying for state income taxes. That or you will end up with lousy infrastructure. Certain roads in Florida are virtually always under construction and behind the times, and construction that takes monthes in other states takes years in FL.

    When I left FL, new grads were starting at 17-23 an hour. The lower pay rates are more common in rural areas and the Panhandle. And remember that the hospital economy is based on tourism/winter migration, which is taking a major hit right now. Your PTO or paycheck will take a hit during the summers. That is if you can find a job AT ALL, which many new grads are having difficulty with. And unless you are in rural FL, it is best to learn Spanish.
    roser13, winnieander, Charizard, and 5 others like this.

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  2. 2
    I'm in Jacksonville, thanks to the economy went back into nursing after 4 years staying home with kids, and the highest offer I received was $25/hr with nearly 20 years of experience under my belt. No state taxes, sure, but the cost of living is not cheap. Utilities are astronomical, food is expensive, and auto insurance rates are high as well. I spent 14 years in the midwest before returning to my home state and could not believe the cost of living here. And Florida is a "right-to-work" state with no job security, no unions (or at least not many that I know of), no staffing ratios, and horrible work loads. With what I've seen of the hospitals here, I'm happy to stay in home health.
    flg8tr and tthor5220 like this.
  3. 0
    Carol and Kate, very well put. Nailed all considerations in those posts.
    "Pay you in sunshine." What a ridiculous concept! I think if I heard that from an employer, I would know where they were telling me to go...ELSEWHERE!!!
  4. 0
    WOW CAROL!! THAT BREAKS IT DOWN!! THANKS!! DOES ANYONE AGREE WITH CAROL?!!! THIS IS SOOOOOOOOOO IMPORTANT GUYS! THAnks!
  5. 0
    $18 ewww........last home care job for me was $28 an hour. i was considering Fl after speaking with a friend this morning who lives in Hudson. She said it does not even pay her to cook since the local restaraunts are so cheap.also she said the houses were half the cost as the North east. Now I am confused. another friend said that the nurses in Naples hospital were trying to unionize several years back due to unrealistic long shifts that the police were even alerted to. She said the police surrounded the hospital several blocks away in all directions hoping to snag tired Drs and Nurses and ticket them. Where the heck is it good for nurses these days? I live in NJ and new grads are being froze out of hiring in many of the better hospitals here and in Philly. I do not want a hospital job but want to go back to home care and now I see that I am competing with all the newbees.
  6. 0
    Wishing either my husband or I had a pension...reading the posts above I see I will need to look for work right where I live. Florida sound like it is just as bad if not worse than here ...minus the bigger paycheck in exchange for sunshine.
  7. 1
    Quote from Airbrushguy
    Well I googled the Salarys in Orlando and they say $63k is the average ... so I dont think I believe the " $19 per hour" base comment. And Im not sure how there is such a big differential comparatively via the state tax savings? Evidently Floridians do nto pay State Taxes.. but Im trying to figure out how that translates via a salary comparison.

    You should believe it.. Salary searches online are not very accurate. I know the average starting pay right now for New grads in my area is $20-$22. So where the poster was referring to $19 in 2007 sounds accurate. Nurses I work with who have years of experience (over 10 years) are still in the $25-$27/hr range.
    flg8tr likes this.
  8. 0
    Wow!! This sounds so discouraging...my husband and I just got back from Ft. Lauderdale and were thinking about moving there. I have been an LPN for 18 yrs and currently make $28.00per hour here in Tucson, AZ. I start my LPN to RN bridge course in a week or so and my husband is currently in an LPN program that will bridge to RN later on, we had our hearts set on Florida, doesn't look so promising anymore Anyone have any thoughts on the Reno, NV area??
  9. 0
    ORLANDO area hospitals pay between $20-23/hr for new grads + shift differentials, nights/weekends, and will bump approximately $1 each for completion of orientation program, additional certifications.

    This is for med/surg, med/tele type positions.

    I believe critical care (ICU, ER, OR, etc) actually get paid $1-$2/hr less because of some legal mumbo jumbo? But I am not sure on this part, this was something I was told by some staff during clinicals.
  10. 0
    Quote from caroladybelle
    Are you going to believe a online resource that supports business interests, or the people that have actually live, work and breathe there?In 1993, when I started as an RN at a central Florida hospital (that now recently acquired magnet status), my base pay rate was 12.50 an hour for team leading UAP and maybe one LPN for up to 19 patients on a unit that cared for predominantly fresh postop pts.Said hospital was unable to find staff to work with them, so reformed and sought and attained magnet status. Guess what, the pay rate is so poor, they STILL can't stay staffed, in an era when there are tons of new RNs seeking jobs, and several nursing schools in the immediate area.One day when I inquired about the poor pay, I received an answer echoed by many other poor paying FL hospitals, "This is Florida, you get paid in sunshine".I spent years trying to get Visa, my student loans, TECO, etal to accept some sunshine for payment for bills - lord knows that I do not need it. For some reason, they don't bite on the "paid in sunshine" transaction.PS. I am a native Floridian, that traveled in the East coast. As of 10 monthes ago, I finally settled in the mid Atlantic area, with Boston as a second choice. Upon arriving here, my base pay rate increased by more than $10/hr, my pt ratio decreased substantially, my stress level dropped, and I got treated much better by the MDs, management, HR and my pts. I also don't get the seasonal continual low census in the off season, that cuts down on your pay check, and PTO that is so common in Florida. Nor the killer, work you to death and understaffing that accompanies the snowbird season, when the hospitals put beds in the halls with partitions around them and fill them.11 monthes ago, I was an underpaid, unhealthy wretch, who rarily got a break in shift, and could never give my pts the care that they deserved and needed because upper management never allowed for enough staff to adequately cover the floor. At least once per month or two, some nurse was being called in to give a deposition.Paying a minimal state income tax is minor compared to that. And even the record 80 some odd inches of snow up here has not dissuaded me. I recently bought an AWD car (which courtesy of my pay here I can now afford) to help manage. The accomodations here for staying over on snow days are much more comfortable than the FL accomodations for staying over for hurricanes.Also remember that state income tax serves a purpose - to pay for services that the state provides. That money has to come from somewhere. And since the Florida constitution (I believe) bars state income tax, and it is highly unlikely that any FL legislator is bucking for punishment at the polls as to attempt to tamper with that, that means taxes and fees (mainly property taxes have to make up the shortfall. You will make up the difference that you "save" not paying for state income taxes. That or you will end up with lousy infrastructure. Certain roads in Florida are virtually always under construction and behind the times, and construction that takes monthes in other states takes years in FL.When I left FL, new grads were starting at 17-23 an hour. The lower pay rates are more common in rural areas and the Panhandle. And remember that the hospital economy is based on tourism/winter migration, which is taking a major hit right now. Your PTO or paycheck will take a hit during the summers. That is if you can find a job AT ALL, which many new grads are having difficulty with. And unless you are in rural FL, it is best to learn Spanish.
    Where are you in Boston? Which hospital? And do they hire new grads? Thnx


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