paramedic nursing

  1. 0 Hi, I'm a 2nd year nursing student and have an interest in paramedic nursing. Is there anybody involved in this area of nursing and would like to share some related information?
    For example what would be the expected requirements to enter this field?
    Thanks,
    Lynda
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  3. Visit  mcgill01 profile page

    About mcgill01

    Joined Oct '01; Posts: 2.

    69 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  tanyalawrence profile page
    0
    Hi,
    I don't know your location, but I know in Ontario, Canada you can't be a paramedic unless you take the 2 year college course, even if you are an RN. I checked into it. It's unfortunate.
    Hope this helps,
    Tanya
  5. Visit  keaston profile page
    0
    I am an RN and a Paramedic 1 working in the Yukon at this time. I work as a Flight Nurse and when I'm not flying I work as a Paramedic in the ambulance. The Yukon is unique in that they don't require you to have your EMT-P certificate, but I believe in most other provinces and states you need to have both certificates to work in this area. If you are interested in the advanced skills of a paramedic and in providing nursing care then Flight nursing is an interesting line of work. There are a few areas hiring nurses, but most request that you have 3-5 years ICU/ER/CCU/CSICU/NICU experience. But if you get into oine of these specialty units you could work on your EMT-P certificate as many places offer part-time or distance ed programs.
  6. Visit  Zhakrin profile page
    0
    Hi there,
    I am a certified Paramedic in Ontario and I am finishing my degree in Nursing, therefore I have alittle knowledge of this area.

    With the baby boomers retiring, Ambulance, Fire and Police are being hard hit to find suitable replacements for their retiring personnel.

    What this means is that a nursing degree is well looked at when applying for the jobs. as for a nurse becoming a Paramedic, it is possible. I was offered a nursing position and a part-time medic position in Ontario. My girlfriend, who is a nurse but not a paramedic, was told that she could have the same deal. all she had to do was "challenge" the certification exam, which the hospital & ambulance service were willing to help her do.

    So, its possible for nurse to do both. As both a medic and a Paramedic I can clearly say that the only skill difference between the too, AT THE ENTRY LEVEL, is that the nurse would need to become familar with the policies, equipement and have a class F licence. The Radio operators course is a 4 hour BS course, so dont sweat it.

    Good luck. :zzzzz
    Last edit by Zhakrin on Feb 9, '02
  7. Visit  petiteflower profile page
    0
    I ride an ambulance as an RN. I can do as much or more than a Paramedic. In our state there is a bridge program under development of RN/Paramedic and vice versa. Hopefully it will be up and running in a year.

    b
  8. Visit  dbringle profile page
    0
    Hi, in North Carolina, in certain counties an RN can Challenge the EMT-P exam. I am an RN working towards everything I need to fly, I have opted not to challenge the exam so.. I have just started the EMT-P class. The college I am going to has accepted my RN in place of EMT-I which cuts a year off the EMT-P class. I will finish next May. Hope this helps!
  9. Visit  nursemt850 profile page
    0
    Hi, in South Texas they did away with the RN/Paramedic bridge program. If you are an RN and want to be a EMT-P, you at least need to go to school for the EMT-Basic; which is aprox. 3 months.Once you have the EMT-B, you can skip the EMT-I but you are still require to attend the whole EMT-P course.(including EMS ride outs and ER clinical hours). Probably the reason they did this here is that there to many nurses who didn't know what to do in the field, how to control and MVA scene, a shooting scene,etc... Down here there are only a handful of RN/Paramedics (in 7 counties) I am an LVN and EMT and will finish my RN in december. I plan on being an RN/NREMT-P and be ready to FLY!!!!!!
  10. Visit  EMTPTORN profile page
    0
    here in florida an rn can challenge the state paramedic exam......i believe they have to have their emt basic. a paramedic (at my nursing school) can opt to clep one semester of the rn program.....of which i chose not to even try.

    as far as skills go, paramedics are only limited to what medical control allows. where i work, the sky is the limit as to what you want to do, you just need the courage to try or ask. we have it much more liberal than rn's in the hospital or er's, at least in my area.

    i have worked in 2 other states, and they each were different with some rules, but neither allowed any clep for the rn to paramedic..., but they both did vice versa.

    after working as a paramedic 13 years i cannot imagine why a nurse would want to do my job.....maybe some can't figure out why i want to be a nurse either.
  11. Visit  Jim Rodgers profile page
    0
    Hello, I am a NREMTP and just finished a ADN program. I also teach @ a communtiy college that has a AAS paramedic program. We are investigating a RN to paramedic bridge couse. I work part-time for a flight progarm and all the full-time RN's are also NREMTP's. I feel this is an excellent combination. My goal in teaching paramedics is to teach the simalarities and the dissimalarities in the two professions.
  12. Visit  CraigB-RN profile page
    0
    I"m sorry but after spending 20 years as a Paramedic and now 5+ as an RN, I think it's a waste to be both. It's not the certification it's the training that makes a difference. WHen I'm in the back of an aircraft if something goes wrong, I'm going to be judged as an RN and not as a paramedic, even if I have the certification.
  13. Visit  EMS-RN profile page
    0
    I work as an RN both on a medical floor and in an emergency department. I've also worked on an ambulance since...um...not going to admit my age. :-) Though you've probably long since had your questions answered, I thought I'd throw my two cents in anyway... In California, as an RN, you can challenge the Paramedic license. Though the exact requirements can vary from school to school, as I understand it at a minimum the candidate must A) Be affiliated with a paramedic program (i.e. have an endorsing school), B) Must pass the skills test(s) and written examination(s), C) Must successfully complete a field internship, and D) Must successfully pass the national registry exam. At this point you will be indistinguishable from the paramedics who went through the full paramedic program, but you aren't done yet... The county in which you intend to work will have a few more hoops for you to jump through as well...usually written test, fees, letter of intent from a prospective employer, etc. (unlike many states, in CA the paramedic protocols and certification is a county-by-county thing rather than a full state thing). Having said all this I must caution you (and any other RN intending to become a paramedic) that working as a paramedic is NOT the same as working as a nurse. I would VERY STRONGLY enourage anyone considering this jump to at least have their EMT and a good year of experience of working on an ambulance or they may find the internship on the ambulance to be something of a disaster.
  14. Visit  Peg804 profile page
    0
    Just my 2 cents, but I must comment, RN to paramedic. There is a vast difference between and RN and an paramedic, or if you are in such a state, a phrn/hp (prehospital rn-who has challenged the nat reg testing and has the approp skills, or paramedic. If you are thinking of challenging any prehospital course, you better get some field experience. The world of an RN, and the world of a PHRN/HP are completely different. When you get that patient in the ED, they are packaged for you, meaning they are immobilized, splinted, bleeding is controlled, intubated, defib, etc. In the field you are the one who is doing the packaging. you are the one making the decisions. There is a vast difference intubating in a lab vs the back seat of vehicle which is crushed under an tractor trailer, let alone the IV start. You have you to rely on. Make sure that you have the experience to work in the prehospital world. I do both, and I have the greatest respect for fiedl medics and the few PHRN/HP;s that are out there. Most of us, atleast in PA, actually started as EMT's. Good luck to those who join us, but make sure you are ready. cause you cannot yell, start over. at 2am on the interstate. Just my 2 cents
    Peg :hatparty:
  15. Visit  AFnurse3 profile page
    0
    I totally agree with you that pre-hosital treatment is totally different than regular hospital nursing, and everyone going into it needs field experience before being the paramedic in charge of the scene. But, with all due respect, even in a hospital at 0200, you can't yell "start over" and expect results!!!

    Quote from Peg804
    Just my 2 cents, but I must comment, RN to paramedic. There is a vast difference between and RN and an paramedic, or if you are in such a state, a phrn/hp (prehospital rn-who has challenged the nat reg testing and has the approp skills, or paramedic. If you are thinking of challenging any prehospital course, you better get some field experience. The world of an RN, and the world of a PHRN/HP are completely different. When you get that patient in the ED, they are packaged for you, meaning they are immobilized, splinted, bleeding is controlled, intubated, defib, etc. In the field you are the one who is doing the packaging. you are the one making the decisions. There is a vast difference intubating in a lab vs the back seat of vehicle which is crushed under an tractor trailer, let alone the IV start. You have you to rely on. Make sure that you have the experience to work in the prehospital world. I do both, and I have the greatest respect for fiedl medics and the few PHRN/HP;s that are out there. Most of us, atleast in PA, actually started as EMT's. Good luck to those who join us, but make sure you are ready. cause you cannot yell, start over. at 2am on the interstate. Just my 2 cents
    Peg :hatparty:


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