Nurse Residency Programs - page 7

by Jump_Nurse | 96,057 Views | 65 Comments

Hey all. I'm trying to put together a list of hospitals that offer nurse residency programs for new graduates. Here is what I have so far, please add any hospitals that you know of.. Seton Hospital - Austin, TX Georgetown... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    My hospital has a 7 month nurse residency for new grads going into speciality units. GNs are hired into specific units by the nurse manager of that unit and then attend the residency program. Except for the SICU all residency position are open to and new grad RN regardless weather they are ADNs, BSNs or direct entry masters. The SICU only hires ADN grads. The units that offer the residency are SICU, MICU, ER, PICU, PACU, NICU, L&D. Those hired are required to sign a 2 year contract that doesn't start until AFTER the 7 month residency. Violation of the contract is a $15K pay off not prorated. It used to be 6K and prorated but so many left after the residency they increased it. Those who finish the residency are in huge demand in this regions hospitals. Some of the hospitals have even paid off the contract in order to hire them.
    Residents are full employees of the hospital and are paid at the new grad starting wage with the same benefits as everybody else.
    Spots in the residency are very competitive. I am on the interview committee for the SICU and we had 2 spots for the spring 2011 class and got about 40 qualified application and about that many more from unqualified people like those who graduated from BSN programs. We hired two of them. One a 19 year old female and the other a 39 year old male who is a former truck driver. Both had completed a summer internship in the unit and both had very strong ties to the community.
    16 other new grads were hired for the residency for the other units

    I'm really confused by this. I thought you may have made a mistake the first time, but to state it twice....

    you do know the difference between ADN and BSN right?
  2. 0
    Quote from LaughingRN
    I'm really confused by this. I thought you may have made a mistake the first time, but to state it twice....

    you do know the difference between ADN and BSN right?
    *** Wow, I suppose to think I made a mistake is reasonable, but to adopt a condecending attitude and ask if I know the difference? Wow. To answer your question, yes, 12-24 months of part time, online classes.
  3. 0
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    *** Wow, I suppose to think I made a mistake is reasonable, but to adopt a condecending attitude and ask if I know the difference? Wow. To answer your question, yes, 12-24 months of part time, online classes.
    There was no condescending attitude intended.

    I was trying to understand why you kept repeating that a BSN was unqualified when it is a higher degree and more education than an ADN.

    I think that the difference is a bit more than 12-24 months of part time, online classes.

    Seeing that you sit on the interview committee, I found your statement odd, and perhaps a little insulting to all us BSN RN's who worked hard to get their education.
  4. 0
    there was no condescending attitude intended.

    *** i will take you at your word.

    i was trying to understand why you kept repeating that a bsn was unqualified when it is a higher degree and more education than an adn.

    *** i said the bsn is unqualified for the sicu nurse residency program cause it is. not my decision, and not one i agree with but that's the way it is. there are good reasons for it, but still not the decision i would have made.

    i think that the difference is a bit more than 12-24 months of part time, online classes.

    *** that's what an rn with an associates degree needs to become and rn with a bsn. lots of people do it in less than a year, i did.

    seeing that you sit on the interview committee, i found your statement odd, and perhaps a little insulting to all us bsn rn's who worked hard to get their education.

    *** why anyone would be insulted by a statement of fact i can't imagine. i wasn't expressing my opionon.
  5. 0
    Yes, you do get paid.
  6. 0
    It makes sense that hospitals prefer those with experience, but obviously new grads have to start somewhere and it seems like a hospital that does not hire them is implying they do not have the resources to train them - monetary, staffing or otherwise. It is very surprising to hear that a new grad with a less senior credential like LPN/LVN would ever be preferred over a new grad with a BSN or MSN. Surely if they qualify for a new grad position their experience advantage is unlikely to be very significant.


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