Left Nursing After 3 Months and Couldn't Be Happier! - page 9

by sweetgeorgia

Hi everyone, I'm posting a topic today to offer hope to those of you who may have been in my shoes at some point in time. Little history: I decided to go into nursing through a second bachelor's degree program since my... Read More


  1. 0
    To the OP: Congrats on your new career! It must be exciting to start out on something new. I admire you for giving your nursing career a chance. As others have mentioned, nursing isn't right for everyone. I imagine all you've learned and experienced though nursing will make you stronger as a teacher. I'm considering a career change as well. I've always enjoyed volunteering, learning about the sciences, and health in general. I've done fairly well, even asked to consider a management position, but I never felt like nursing " clicked" for me. After working at the bedside for a few years now, I'm working on a degree in business with hopes it'll help me transition to a new career. Again, best wishes and good luck as you embark on a teaching career.
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    @HouTx,
    But I am not, I am quiet, I am helpful. I dont like confronting people or drama. When I have down time I ask people if they need help and most of the RNs I worked with there have said I was a sweetheart. There is just a select few that make my time there a living hell because they are just mean-spirited and bullies, and they are just plain lazy.
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    I absolutely have to agree with you nursl56. I have been a nurse for 5 years with a couple months off here and there (for children). In those 5 years I have worked in two different hospitals on Med-Surg Tele/Stroke floors. Talk about stress! I have been flex/prn for the past two years and as much as I enjoy the flexibility of my job the stress I endure while there is overwhelming. True, I am not there as much as my fellow nurses who work full-time which adds to my stress but when all the staff nurses are there 2-3 hours after the shift ends to finish charting there is a problem. I worked a day shift (my normal 6:30a-7p) on a Saturday, generally a slower shift, myself and the 4 other staff nurses worked until 9pm that night finishing up our charting. I have never worked harder or under more stress than I did that day and it is becoming a trend on our floor. During the weekdays the work environment is worse. We have lost 6 nurses in the last 4months and they were experienced, seasoned nurses, not new grads.
    I love being an nurse. I have wanted to be a nurse for as long as I can remember. I was not able to start nursing school until later in life due to becoming a mother at 18 years old. But with a passion for nursing and a goal in mind I fulfilled my dream. I am not ready to give up on nursing because I know in my heart this is who I am. Even though I love the staff I work with and the patients I care for I am not happy with the nurse I have become at my facility. I have chosen to leave my job and finish my degree in nursing (I finish with a BSN in May :-) and enjoy the next 6 months with my children.
    I hope the time away from the hospital will give me a new perspective on nursing and a chance to further my career and go in a different more positive direction.
    nursel56 likes this.
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    Quote from Flatlander
    I have to agree. This is the part we weren't warned about in nursing school. Sure we heard that nurses eat their young, but thought it couldn't be that bad.
    .
    Really? No one told you this in school? Is it possible that you didn't really hear it (or believe it)? As an instructor, it is very easy for us to give the "real life" speech, but a) it could scare many students away, or b) they would just say "that's not gonna happen to me, because I'm going to work days (or insert any unrealistic new grad belief in here). We scare them enough already, with the reality that they might not even pass the class!

    Also, when in clinical, do students not see what is going on around them? I know mine do. Whem the floor nurses tell the, "why are you doing this, nursing is a terrible career", what do the students say? they think the nurses are being mean and negative, or are just in a bad mood. When the students complain about how they can never find their nurse, or the nurse is Kurt with them, we talk about the demands of the nurses. I tell them to take a look at the board, and see how many patients their nurse has.

    This thread is a great topic for discussion with students and new grads. I k ow it sounds clliche, but Nursing is not for everyone. I wish more people realized that before they invest so much time, money and mental anguish. I wish so many people didn't look at it as an easy path to a good career (I wanted to be a doctor, but nursing is faster and easier) or 'good money', or be so influenced by their family members who encourage them to get into it. I have no regrets about my career choice, but I haven't always been happy.

    For those who feel like the OP: no matter what your first job is, it WILL be overwhelming. The wonderful thing about nursing, is that there are options. Obviously not for new grads, you have to put in your time. No one becomes a CEO,or even a manager of a business right out of school. You will struggle at first. A very small percentage will get their dream job right out of school in 2012 (or 2013). Only you will know if you should cut your losses early, try a new job (if you can land one), or bow pit completely.
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    Quote from ProfRN4

    Really? No one told you this in school? Is it possible that you didn't really hear it (or believe it)? As an instructor, it is very easy for us to give the "real life" speech, but a) it could scare many students away, or b) they would just say "that's not gonna happen to me, because I'm going to work days (or insert any unrealistic new grad belief in here). We scare them enough already, with the reality that they might not even pass the class!

    Also, when in clinical, do students not see what is going on around them? I know mine do. Whem the floor nurses tell the, "why are you doing this, nursing is a terrible career", what do the students say? they think the nurses are being mean and negative, or are just in a bad mood. When the students complain about how they can never find their nurse, or the nurse is Kurt with them, we talk about the demands of the nurses. I tell them to take a look at the board, and see how many patients their nurse has.

    This thread is a great topic for discussion with students and new grads. I k ow it sounds clliche, but Nursing is not for everyone. I wish more people realized that before they invest so much time, money and mental anguish. I wish so many people didn't look at it as an easy path to a good career (I wanted to be a doctor, but nursing is faster and easier) or 'good money', or be so influenced by their family members who encourage them to get into it. I have no regrets about my career choice, but I haven't always been happy.

    For those who feel like the OP: no matter what your first job is, it WILL be overwhelming. The wonderful thing about nursing, is that there are options. Obviously not for new grads, you have to put in your time. No one becomes a CEO,or even a manager of a business right out of school. You will struggle at first. A very small percentage will get their dream job right out of school in 2012 (or 2013). Only you will know if you should cut your losses early, try a new job (if you can land one), or bow pit completely.
    AGREE!!!

    I have been in the healthcare field for 12 years, and I know I have the temperament to stay in nursing for another 18 years. I have been a CNA, a LPN and am a RN. I have said this time and time again: Nursing is NOT for everybody or for the "weak"-sounds harsh but YOU MUST ADVOCATE for YOURSELF for the sake if you patients and career. I have seen how the healthcare profession had been bombarded by "business"-ironic how the business and retail world now wants to run their businesses in the hours of hospitals-and how that can be a huge pill to swallow. I have worked for Magnet, non Magnet, for profit, non-profit small businesses, you name it I've seen it!!!! I have been a preceptor, active on committees in my organizations, and have always satisfied on the way I have advocated for this profession, whether there was change or status-quo. My REACTION and the TEACHABLE moments have made me a better nurse, and remaining flexible in my options to dictate my career based on my life balance HAS KEPT me from never being fired....it has ALWAYS been given me RESPECT from my peers and management -if they ever disliked me, I couldn't care less. I always set the tone of respect me I'll respect you, let's take care of our patients the best way be possibly can!!!
    LIFE, including nursing is full of BS and every thing in between...There really is no difference unless YOU are the catalyst for the outcome. You have the POWER to make your own life work for YOU and no one, no organization can take that away from any of you, regardless if you choose to enter, stay, or leave nursing, or are in ANY Profession or position. YOU still are YOU, and YOU decide how YOU react to life in general.
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    Makes perfect sense. Just like when you choose to go out alone after dark, and then you get assaulted. You knew what you were getting yourself into. Your mother warned you not to go out alone after dark, so therefore it's your own fault if someone assaults you. Going out alone after dark is not for the weak or faint of heart! If you don't want to be assaulted, then stay home behind your locked door when it is dark out!
    Last edit by ~*Stargazer*~ on Dec 29, '12
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    Quote from ~*Stargazer*~
    Makes perfect sense. Just like when you choose to go out alone after dark, and then you get assaulted. You knew what you were getting yourself into. Your mother warned you not to go out alone after dark, so therefore it's your own fault if someone assaults you. Going out alone after dark is not for the weak or faint of heart! If you don't want to be assaulted, then stay home behind your locked door when it is dark out!
    I don't know if this is a response to my post, but FYI I am a domestic violence survivor...so you are entitled to your sarcasm, but I speak on the merit of my own personal victories by not backing DOWN. My point is that anyone's responses to life's challenges are up to the self. One of the things that can happen in nursing, because its a female dominated profession is the myth that we are supposed "to take it" as well as the clicks, the pack mentality, etc. We are painted as to be victims. I have endured racism, classism, ageism, assumptions on what type of nurse or person I am, etc. It GOES with the territory of LIFE. If you cannot walk away from a situation or speak up PERIOD, then LIFE WILL EAT YOU ALIVE, no matter what your status, position, etc. We are going to endure in life, and lessons learned makes a excellent teachable moment. I applaud the OP who walked away. They take courage and the POWER to say "this is not for me." For the ones who are suffering emotional burnout, yet want to stay in nursing it takes COURAGE to say "I need help" "I need to talk to someone" "I/we need to be treating each other better". We as nurses, in my opinion, have the RIGHT to be treated with RESPECT and integrity. And if WE don't expect it and stand on that principle, then who will?
    sweetgeorgia likes this.
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    LadyFree28,

    I was speaking to the"blame the victim" mentality that I am seeing represented here. Some people seem to be of the opinion that if another person is unhappy with nursing, then it is due to a character flaw within that person, rather than the idea that there just might be something wrong with acute care bedside nursing nowadays.

    I'm not sure why you felt compelled to share that you have a DV history, but since you brought it up, I will say that lots of us have severe past trauma and yet we each experience nursing in our own unique way.
    nurseladybug12 and sweetgeorgia like this.
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    Quote from ~*Stargazer*~
    LadyFree28,

    I was speaking to the"blame the victim" mentality that I am seeing represented here. Some people seem to be of the opinion that if another person is unhappy with nursing, then it is due to a character flaw within that person, rather than the idea that there just might be something wrong with acute care bedside nursing nowadays.

    I'm not sure why you felt compelled to share that you have a DV history, but since you brought it up, I will say that lots of us have severe past trauma and yet we each experience nursing in our own unique way.
    Thanks Stargazer, I'm with you on that-more Grrr-l Power is needed! 😄
    For us and this female dominated profession to survive sooooo long, we have all had challenges in our life, and we are STILL HERE, which is AWESOME. The most we can do as nurses, is drop that victim mentality.

    I felt compelled to share because my experience in that situation allowed me to look at life in a very different way, and in situations of interpersonal relationships, especially professional relationships, and I built on my previous experiences, and it had helped me for the better, whether it may be patients, their families, doctors nurses, upper management, nurses, and everyone in between that I have interacted, even my own family. I think we owe it to ourselves in our profession to review sometimes our worse days and build on them, especially for new grads and people who are here who love the profession and have started taking their required courses to the ones who have significant mileage in the nursing game if we are committed to the profession. Own up to what could've gone better, do some soul searching, mindset searching, and if you decide to be in nursing for another day, remember it's a new day-you only can do your BEST!


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