Graduate Entry

  1. Hi everyone,
    I was wondering if anyone had any comments regarding programs for people who have a Bachelors degree in a non-nursing field. One program gets you an MSN in Nursing and you pick your specialty and you are an advanced practice nurse in three years. So normally it takes a person 4 years to get the BSN, a few years gaining experience to apply for an MSN program. Is the above program a good idea. That seems kind of impossible to be able to practice as an NP or something with only three years total of nursing training. Would a hospital hire you? Any comments?
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  2. 4 Comments

  3. by   livingthedream
    I started a Masters Entry program in Sept. When I am done I will have a Masters of Science in Nursing - but will not be an AP nurse. I also can take 2 classes and sit for the CNL exam if I would like. My program is 18 months.

    There is an option then for me to add a year, or work and then come back for 1 year and become an APN. I am not sure how many do that, but I hope to.

    Program is fast paced and you cannot work and do it at the same time (they told us that and I believe them!!).

    Good luck!
  4. by   elkpark
    There are a bunch of older threads here discussing people's views and opinions on direct entry programs. If you're really interested in what people think of the pros and cons, you can do a search and review them.
  5. by   shihtzulover
    Ok, I will definitely go do a search. Thanks for the input!
  6. by   ♪♫ in my ♥
    Quote from shihtzulover
    Hi everyone,
    I was wondering if anyone had any comments regarding programs for people who have a Bachelors degree in a non-nursing field. One program gets you an MSN in Nursing and you pick your specialty and you are an advanced practice nurse in three years. So normally it takes a person 4 years to get the BSN, a few years gaining experience to apply for an MSN program. Is the above program a good idea. That seems kind of impossible to be able to practice as an NP or something with only three years total of nursing training. Would a hospital hire you? Any comments?
    I'm starting a direct-entry MSN program in January that will let me sit for the CNL exam if I want to. I think this generalist approach is a great way for mid-career professionals to switch into nursing. The alternative is an accelerated second bachelor's degree program. For my background, the master's level work is more appropriate. That really depends on individual preparation, though.

    A direct-entry program that leads to some sort of APN seems more difficult. In my case, I'm going to be competing with other entry-level nurses. In the case of an APN, one would be competing with new graduates who already have substantial clinical experience. It seems like that would create difficulty in getting hired.

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