A new direction

  1. I've gotten a little side tracted from my goal of an independent nursing practice. However there is a very good reason and one that will actually help my nursing business when I can get it off the back burner.

    My hubby and I just opened another unrelated business. Consequently. I have learned about corporations limited libility companies etc. and have some inside information abouth this that is very limited to most folks.

    As soon as I started on the incorporating process I knew I had to write a book. One focused at nurses but one that could be used by anyone.

    As a consequence of dealing with this new business I have found some direction for the nursing business.

    Here is where I will be going. personalized nursing care for individuals. Wellness education, and professional development. The latter will fall under the nursing heading of a comunity health wellness diagnosis.

    I will be doing seminars and workshops. For women and nurses on presenting themselves with the best possible advantage in the work place.
    There will be likely a seminar or something on my book or at least speeches to promote it.

    The book will basically be a how to (and why) incorporate on the cheap. It will, explain exactly how and why to do this; to do it without fear; and to do it in the most advantageous way.

    Perhaps you have heard there are special advantages to incorporate in Nevada and Deleware but did not know how this would help you in Minasota, Mississippi or where ever you happen to be. Perhaps you have heard that you need certain connections in NV ect. Perhaps it seemed out of reach or not applicable to you. NOT SO. I will help my reader figure out if they should incorp in their own state or another, and guide them step by step through the process.

    The book will not give information that is quickly dated (as in so many out there) but instead will direct you where to quickly find the most up to date information.

    Like any venture mistakes are made the first time through. I have already been there once and intend to incorporated several more ventures of my own. I will guide the reader from mistakes that results from poorly written and spoken information that is out there.

    You will be surprised how poorly informed many business specialist are in their own field of supposed expertise. You will learn that the person who handles the business accounts at your bank may be very ignorant about the very things you reasonably expect them to know. I will guide you to the right person to get the correct information that you need.

    I was told to register as an LLC. - bad advice,
    I was told it would take 8-1- weeks and $800 or more - by my attorney. Both I already knew were out right lies. ( I had my charter and articles of incorporation in 24 hours)

    I was told that licensing through one of the agencies that I had to process through would take 10 weeks. (It was completed in one day) When I did this I heard, "no one ever gets through there the first time."

    From the time we desided to go forward with this until we had every requirement in place and openeds our doors it was 20 days. Folks thing I am some kind of genius.
    Not genius. No rocket science. I just went to the sources. I bypassed my attorney, who said, "those people down there" (the Secretary of State office) were difficult to deal with. By-passed the attorney! Yes, am I a legal risk for doing it? Not at all. All my documents are written in plain english though still retain a formal air. Any reasonably inteligent person can understand them without resorting to a lawyer's interpetation.

    I discovered what lawyers and a few authors don't want you to know about incorporating. It is no mystery. It dosen't require a law degree or an accounting degree to stay out of trouble.
    I was given some bad information by "experts" about banking, posting bonds, dealing with tax boards, insurance and on and on. Enough to discourage Jobe. Over and over I was told things either could not be done would take months would cost thosands or hundereds more that they actually did.

    I will do this again and again only without the hassels and more than likely even faster and definately cheaper. My book will not give legal advice. But will guide you step by step though the mechanics and what decisions you need to make and the information you need to make them and why I made the decisions that I made.

    I do not discourage consulting attorneys or accountants but do clarify things they will definately not tell you simply because if you knew you would realize when you do not need them and would use their service less.

    I have a lot cut out for me as I am still by necessity very tied up with my husband's venture. However, I wanted you to know there are answers to your questions about incorporating; that I am indeed going though with my business;

    and that one thing often leads to another in ways we can't imagine. But that sounds like a seminar topic itself to me.
    Last edit by Agnus on Apr 4, '03
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   nightingale
    Agnus, that sounds wonderful. Could you share the type of business you are in right now?

    The book and seminar sound fantastic and very much needed in the community. Which state are you incormporated in? Did you opt for an S-Corp.?
  4. by   Ted
    Thanks for your post, Angus.

    I know a woman who set up two corporations (one profit and one not-for-profit) by herself. . . without the aid of an attorney. She did her homework, much like the way you seemed to have done your homework. She is one of a few who business role models for Amy and me. She started out knowing absolutely nothing. Zip. Zero. She, now, has her hand in both businesses (a little bit less with the not-for-profit, though, because of time) which are running smoothly.

    FYI: Her not-for-profit business is a successful after-school program offering a variety of activities for pre-teen, early teen children. These activities were art, music and sport related. Amy used to be one of the instuctors and taught theater & performance.

    Her for-profit business (the one the brings in all the $$$ for her household) is actually with her husband. Her husband is educated and is an expert in setting up programs for states that condition vans for handicapped people. Like, quadraplegic people who have the minimal (enough) arm and hand motion to drive these condition vans. Never heard of such a thing before I met her and her husband. Anyhow, she was the one who did all of the research, filled out all the papers and established their S - Corporation. She is also the "business manager" of sorts while her husband meets with the appropriate people to set up these programs. (I know I'm over simplifying the nature of their business because I'm not quite sure, myself, what exactly they do except put handicapped people into van that they can drive. . . and work with some kind of state program. . . )


    Ahh. . . but I ramble on and on. . .


    Cheers!

    Ted

    P. S. Please let us know when your book is published. Consider me in line for a purchase.

    Ted
    Last edit by Ted on Apr 5, '03
  5. by   Agnus
    Yep I knew Zip. Learned quick, in those 20 days.
    There are two states that are corporate friendly Deleware and Nevada where I happen to live.

    You can incorporate here and have your business elsewhere. There are big advantages to incorporate in NV and keep your business where you are. But where do you find out how to do this without an attorney if you are in Kalamazoo? And then there is the pesky problem of finding a resident agent in NV.
    Once you inc here you still have to navagate the state licensing board and possibly banks.
    Be aware not all banks are friendly toward businesses. Some Nationally know banks are down right hostle. Not the people who work there but thier polocies and procedures.

    Oh I elected for an S corp for now. and the business is used car sales. We knew nothing about this business but it keeps hubby off the streets. Can you believe we did this so he (retired) would have something to do.
    I chose an S simply because initially I expect more write offs than income from the business. Because there is the potential for a hefty profit later I may need to change to a C corp. By then I will be able to afford to have someone else figure this out.

    In some states you must have a certain amount of capital investment in the business. NV doen't require this. So I put into stock just enough to look serious to banks and the IRS but not enough to jepordize most of what I will contribute to the business. In other words rather than capitalizing it entirely I have made loans of my own $ to the corp.
  6. by   nottus
    I am not sure how old this thread is but please let me know when your book is done. I am looking to opening up a retirement home. I am searching for all the info i can get my hands on.
  7. by   dreamlandeals
    Please let us know when the book is coming out

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