Paperwork Tirade

  1. Once again, my unit's management has announced that computerization has been "pushed back" due to some unexplained delay.
    On one hand, I think "hey, they don't owe the staff an explanation." Then, I realize, "Oh yes, they do. WE are the ones dealing with the results of the delays."
    I'm just venting, I suppose. Getting burned out on all the forms we have to fill out...much of it seeming like a waste of time and effort.
    I'm convinced that if management had devoted as much time into going paperless as they have creating new forms for us to fill out, we wouldn't have so many forms to fill out. I realize that computerization doesn't solve all problems, but it can go a long way toward allowing a nurse to spend more time providing patient care.

    I'm not a nurse. I'm a scribe. A clerk.
    When we admit a patient from the ED, we fill out a form listing all their personal property. Very specific descriptions. Why? If the stuff is missing, what will my form prove? Realistically, it proves nothing except that I filled out the form indicating that they're suppose to have the stuff. Does it give any indication at all about what happend to the stuff? No. If the system is supposed to document a chain of custody of a patient's property, don't we need to get the patient/family/EMS to sign an inventory when the patient comes in? Doesn't the person transporting the patient need to sign off? How about the person receiving the patient on the floor? Guess I'd better be quiet. That'd be more paperwork.
    Here's another good one: Fall risk. We go through a long checklist of fall risk factors, indicating which ones apply. The patient gets a score indicating whether they're a fall risk or not, and, if they are, whether they're High, Medium, or Low. Here's an idea: Until we solve this whole gravity issue, EVERYBODY'S a high fall risk and should be treated accordingly. There we go. One less form to fill out.
    I understand the importance of documentation, but, much of the time, it seems that we're filling out forms for the sake of filling out forms.
    Okay. I feel better now.
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   Altra
    Quote from Email4KH
    Here's an idea: Until we solve this whole gravity issue, EVERYBODY'S a high fall risk and should be treated accordingly. There we go. One less form to fill out.
    Hey, quit yer griping & get to work on that annoying GRAVITY thing before more patients complain about it. That's the responsibility of nursing, too, doncha know ...

    And don't forget to fill out the daily gravity activity forms too, or you'll get a nasty-gram in your mailbox.

    Feel better?
  4. by   casualjim
    Maybe there's a form you could fill out to offer management your suggestions:trout:
  5. by   Email4KH
    If there's not such a form, there's probably a form to request such a form.

    Quote from casualjim
    Maybe there's a form you could fill out to offer management your suggestions:trout:
  6. by   santhony44
    A doctor I once worked with remarked in a meeting one day (about yet another new form, of course!): "one of these days, they're going to have to decide if we're going to do paperwork or take care of patients."

    I'm in a clinic and the paperwork is just ridiculous. I can't wait for electronic medical records, either!
  7. by   Rio
    DOOIIIIIIHHHHH !!!! Just wait until JayCO picks up on the GRAVITY issue., and what about Press-Ganey ? Are your patients... consumers, satisfied with gravity ? Whaat could YOU as a nurse-scribe do to improve upon documentation to DRIVE patietn gravity satisfaction ?
    What a can of worms. Do you think computer documentation is going to be an improvement ?
    Good Luck !
  8. by   EmerNurse
    Quote from Email4KH
    Here's an idea: Until we solve this whole gravity issue, EVERYBODY'S a high fall risk and should be treated accordingly. There we go. One less form to fill out.
    I understand the importance of documentation, but, much of the time, it seems that we're filling out forms for the sake of filling out forms.
    Okay. I feel better now.
    I've always thought this - we need to take the idea of Universal Precautions to the next step:

    1. Everyone is infectious
    2. Everyone is a fall risk
    3. Everyone is an aspiration risk
    4. Everyone is a liar risk (they all have $2000 in their pocket that you can't prove they didn't.
    5. Everyone is a Press Ganey risk (..."I have the time"...)

    And so on - would cut down the paperwork and our lil behinds would be covered <smirk>.

    Ok nuff from me.
  9. by   clee1
    This, and managed care in general, is what happens when professionals allow their business be dictated to by lawyers, accountants, and bureaucrats.

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