Is Indiana RN allowed to give Ketamine for procedural sedation ??

  1. This question is directed to all Indiana RN's.
    Does anyone know if RN's in IN are allowed to administer Ketamine IV/IM for procedural sedation?
    What is your hospital policy?
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  2. 70 Comments

  3. by   Medic173
    Quote from samaritan
    This question is directed to all Indiana RN's.
    Does anyone know if RN's in IN are allowed to administer Ketamine IV/IM for procedural sedation?
    What is your hospital policy?
    YES In our Hospital the RN or Medic, whoever is assigned to the room can admin Ketamine for Sedation.
  4. by   MassED
    Quote from Medic173
    YES In our Hospital the RN or Medic, whoever is assigned to the room can admin Ketamine for Sedation.
    in our facility, it is ANESTHESIOLOGIST or the ED MD on that can push only. Big no no for RN, definitely a no no for MEDIC.
  5. by   christianRN
    I'm pretty sure RNs give Ketamine for procedures in our ER.
    I work in ICU, and have never used it.
  6. by   William_SRNA
    Thsi is an interesting thread and I am glad it was brought up. I would look at your nurse practice acts and call the BON if necessary. There are about 14 states that do not allow the use of "anesthetics" by nurses period. This includes drugs such as propofol which many ICUs utilize. In those states regardless of whether the patient is vented the use of propofol is a violation of nursing practice. Regardles of "We have always used it" or "We'll the doctor ordered it" it doesn't matter the BON decides what you can and cannot use.
  7. by   MassED
    Quote from hoop_jumper
    Thsi is an interesting thread and I am glad it was brought up. I would look at your nurse practice acts and call the BON if necessary. There are about 14 states that do not allow the use of "anesthetics" by nurses period. This includes drugs such as propofol which many ICUs utilize. In those states regardless of whether the patient is vented the use of propofol is a violation of nursing practice. Regardles of "We have always used it" or "We'll the doctor ordered it" it doesn't matter the BON decides what you can and cannot use.
    yes, we use Propofol for a vented pt, in the ED, can't push Diprivan, but can put it on a drip. Stupid if you ask me. Can push drugs for RSI (succs, etc), but can't push Ketamine? If we're qualified for a paralytic, then we should be qualified for a lesser anesthetic. That needs to be re-evaluated and give RN's the credit they deserve for not being numnuts.
  8. by   William_SRNA
    What I found out and was totally surprised is that the use of some anesthetics is strictly for CRNA's and Anesthesiologists even though most crital care nurses use propofol and I remember running numerous tracrium drips in ICU as well for vented patients. I think a lot of revolves around training in the use of the drugs and also in my opinion that a lot of BON are not progressive in their thinking.



    Quote from EDinNC
    yes, we use Propofol for a vented pt, in the ED, can't push Diprivan, but can put it on a drip. Stupid if you ask me. Can push drugs for RSI (succs, etc), but can't push Ketamine? If we're qualified for a paralytic, then we should be qualified for a lesser anesthetic. That needs to be re-evaluated and give RN's the credit they deserve for not being numnuts.
  9. by   rn29306
    Quote from EDinNC
    yes, we use Propofol for a vented pt, in the ED, can't push Diprivan, but can put it on a drip. Stupid if you ask me. Can push drugs for RSI (succs, etc), but can't push Ketamine? If we're qualified for a paralytic, then we should be qualified for a lesser anesthetic. That needs to be re-evaluated and give RN's the credit they deserve for not being numnuts.


    Do you honestly think you are "qualified" to push paralytics? What in your education has taught you to assume airway control and maintenance? That's right, nothing. 5 minutes at the airway station for ACLS doesn't really count either. Nurses are not taught airway management outside of CRNAs and Flight RNs. This is along the same lines of nurses pushing propofol for non-vented patients for CS. If you, the RN for that patient, can't manage what the medicine causes, then you shouldn't be pushing the drug. Nurses give this medicine as MDs are standing there waiting to intubate and your license probably rests on the MD's ability to successfully intubate or at least adequately ventilate that patient.

    Nurses are not numnuts or idiots. They are the backbone of healthcare and patient care / advocacy. Nurses watch the care that other practitioners prescribe like a hawk and rightly so. I am a former ICU / ED/ critical care transport nurse so I know how things are in a hospital... So don't take this as a rant about nursing in general, but..

    Nurses do not manage airways, bottom line. So nurses being "qualified" to give paralytics or other medicines listed as general anesthetics........that's a laughable concept.
    Last edit by rn29306 on Sep 4, '05
  10. by   Cali Nurse
    If you would re-read the post you were commenting on, the person was talking about RSI and vented pts. I think any competent RN knows that paralytics are not used in CS.

    Quote from rn29306
    Do you honestly think you are "qualified" to push paralytics? What in your education has taught you to assume airway control and maintenance? That's right, nothing. 5 minutes at the airway station for ACLS doesn't really count either. Nurses are not taught airway management outside of CRNAs and Flight RNs. This is along the same lines of nurses pushing propofol for non-vented patients for CS. If you, the RN for that patient, can't manage what the medicine causes, then you shouldn't be pushing the drug. Nurses give this medicine as MDs are standing there waiting to intubate and your license probably rests on the MD's ability to successfully intubate or at least adequately ventilate that patient.

    Nurses are not numnuts or idiots. They are the backbone of healthcare and patient care / advocacy. Nurses watch the care that other practitioners prescribe like a hawk and rightly so. I am a former ICU / ED/ critical care transport nurse so I know how things are in a hospital... So don't take this as a rant about nursing in general, but..

    Nurses do not manage airways, bottom line. So nurses being "qualified" to give paralytics or other medicines listed as general anesthetics........that's a laughable concept.
  11. by   purplemania
    Better check your Nurse Practice Act.
  12. by   hrtprncss
    lol norc for cs lol if u give that to me and im not vented, for some reason i wake up after i'm going after everyone lol
  13. by   rn29306
    Quote from Cali Nurse
    If you would re-read the post you were commenting on, the person was talking about RSI and vented pts. I think any competent RN knows that paralytics are not used in CS.
    I re-read my post. I said RNs pushing paralytics for intubation was comparable as pushing propofol for CS. No one ever said anything about giving paralytics for CS. READ THE POST.
  14. by   Cali Nurse
    I'm sorry. It seemed like the EDinNC post was saying that if we can push parayltics for an RSI, and then monitor/sedate the pt once vented, that giving ketamine, a drug which is used commonly in CS should be in our scope of practice. That's why I made the comment. I didn't mean to offend.


    Quote from rn29306
    I re-read my post. I said RNs pushing paralytics for intubation was comparable as pushing propofol for CS. No one ever said anything about giving paralytics for CS. READ THE POST.

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