Fibromyalgia - page 23

What are your opinions, nurses? Is Fibromyalgia a justified condition or just a basket term ? I am interested in your feedback. It seems like we see a large number of patients (usually women) with... Read More

  1. by   teeituptom
    Quote from Jenzee
    So you truly believe all of the people with this DX are hypochondriacs?
    That was written in response to.

    But to answer your question Yes.
  2. by   dnw826
    Quote from Jenzee
    Ummm I don't know if I would call those "fashoinable" diagnosis. I have MVP with regurg. and have some trouble with hypoglycemia. I am not diabetic but if I do not eat right my blood sugar crashes and I end up passed out somewhere on the floor or in the ER. This RARELY happenes now that I am an adult (like once in 5 years) but when I was a kid and didn't understand it happened a lot. Responses like yours are what stop people like me from seeking treatment when having a problem.

    Pls. explain your feelings about MVP. I mean it is dx by an echo. do you not believe that it can cause problems or you just have trouble with the dx in general?? Do you have the same feelings with MVP with regurg.?
    I agree. My ex-MIL had MVP and fibromyalgia. She is in real, true, pain constantly. I have worked with the patients after the pain meds or the hypochondriacs. But I would hate to turn into someone who feels no sympathy and rolls my eyes at people regardless of presentation and situation because of a diagnosis.

    I have a *long* list of medical history problems. Crazy stuff. I feel incredibly judged when I have to list it off for new docs/nurses because you know that a lot of them are just going "yeah, right!". It is sad that now I suppose even healthcare professionals are so cold about people's ailments.

    Fibromyalgia is REAL. People suffer. Just because some people will lie or make something up for drugs does not make the suffering of people with Fibromyalgia any less real. That can go for a lot of other issues, too.

    What a shame!
  3. by   granite109
    Oh, the joy of FM!! what a hot topic, but something that should be addressed. It seems apparent that there are real instances of FM, often with prior injury. In my youthful idealism, I would like to believe that we are nurses identify and are compassionate to those patients. It is not our place to judge, but to treat.

    That being said, I have noticed, anecdotally, a correlation with many, not all, FM patients: caucasian, female, pale skin, slightly overweight, empty nester, often a homemaker. History of low grade depression and perimenopausal, and a bad IV stick, you know, that pasty, kinda chubby skin with that extra subQ layer for no reason (not obese) and no visible veins. (Think back now, I'll bet you agree!)

    I know this is general and sounds judgemental, but it is not intended to be, bear with me here. It appears that there are patients with legit pain issues. They may autoimmune (lupus, MS, RA)age (osteoarthritis), or injury related, and they may be FM. On the other hand, I have seen the above pattern. Is it possible (on a limb here), that there is a body or congenital type that we don't recognize, that causes FM symptoms. There appears to be a general type here that have these symptoms. Unfortunately, docs often generalize with the dx and we need to have a broader look at the patient and investigate it further. Perhaps a new diagnosis would be in order. It would make a great research study. Any thoughts anyone?
  4. by   gr8rnpjt
    Quote from granite109
    Oh, the joy of FM!!
    I know this is general and sounds judgemental,
    that there is a body or congenital type that we don't recognize, that causes FM symptoms. . Any thoughts anyone?

    You mean like the elusive "gay" gene? I am sure you really did not mean to sound judgemental but it would be if you were talking about other conditions. I just wish people would realize that this is something real, the pain is real. But it is a chronic condition, and I honestly can't see why someone with FM would end up admitted and/or in the ER. But as far as a certain body type, I think that is a bit much. Too much stereotyping going on here and that is what I take exception to.
  5. by   granite109
    My sincerest apologies for coming of offensively-that was absolutely not my intent!!! In fact, my intention was just the opposite. There have been studies correlating male pattern baldness to heart disease, apple shaped bodies have higher incidences of MIs, etc. I have noticed a pattern. Is it possible that there is more to the picture and certain traits correlate to certain conditions and symptoms? Mediterranean women actually were the first to have Kaposi's Sarcoma. Not a generalization, but a statistically relevant correlation. Light skinned people get more skin cancer, African Americans have a higher risk for HTN. I am NOT talking about the elusive gay gene, and I take exception to that reference. I am not calling anyone a hypochondriac, as many others have, in fact I am making an apparently weak attempt to advocate. I am merely stating a pattern I have seen where I work-for real. It was not intended to be derogatory. So many people with FM get blown off, perhaps there is more to the story and a new diagnosis is in order. Is it possible that because most sufferers are women that the research is not being done? I have seen similar traits in my patients and I wonder if there is more to the story. Perhaps I did not articulate it properly, but similarities in patients are noteworthy. I am sorry if you disagree.
  6. by   granite109
    OK, this is an old thread, but I feel a need to clarify, so please indulge me. My first post on this thread was apparently inflammatory. That was the opposite of my intention, so my apologies for my inability to express myself.

    So....let's take 3 of my described traits and hypothetically theorize. I have noticed that many of my patients are women and homemakers and generally 35-45. (Even if inaccurate, just go with me here for academic purposes) Is it possible that there is an agent in the home that the victims are exposed to, causing the symptoms? For example, let's say that in 1985, Proctor and Gamble, Kraft, or whoever, came up with a new, innovative product. You know, stain remover, tongue tattoos, hand lotion, whatever...this new product is all the rage. Everybody has it. Now, 22 years later, there are a bunch of 47 year old women with fibromyalgia. Is it possible that the common products used by homemakers of the day caused these problems? Maybe it's in the fast food fries or the milk or the bottled water or the pesticides used on the fruit and veggies, who knows?

    Epidemiologically speaking, similarities MUST be observed and the patient must be described accurately. Trends in symptoms CANNOT be ignored. Why are most FM sufferers women? Is there a hormonal component? Yes, you will proclaim my ignorance again, but we know that PMDD is caused by the hormonal drop just prior to menses. Perhaps all of the female FM sufferers were on the pill and it is a late side effect. Perhaps they all had an epidural an intrapartum. Who knows? Why aren't there an equal number of male sufferers? Is testosterone a factor?

    My point in my original post was that I have seen a trend. In my small microcosm of the universe, I have seen the same thing over and over again. Maybe it's just a coincidence, but that's what research is for. I have MVP and hypoglycemia (DM runs rampant in my family). However, I feel that the FM diagnosis is inadequately studied, which is a disservice to the patient. A lot of FM symptoms are chicken or the egg issues, and we need to study more. It's the only way to make progress and help our patients. So, I stand by my position on demographic similarites. When diagnosing a patient, we must look at the whole picture and maybe we can perform a root cause analysis and maybe even find a cure! Let's hope!
  7. by   teeituptom
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    I guess if you wake up with FM pain, bad enough, you may just wish you were.....


    dead.
    No I will just know Im really living, and I just now woke up a little while ago. Boy am I really alive.
  8. by   teeituptom
    Quote from MzUnderStood
    Once apon a time, PMS was all in the mind...

    Never judge another until you have walked in their shoes.
    And now they are advertising PMDD on TV
  9. by   Miss Chybil RN
    Quote from granite109

    My point in my original post was that I have seen a trend. In my small microcosm of the universe, I have seen the same thing over and over again. Maybe it's just a coincidence, but that's what research is for. I have MVP and hypoglycemia (DM runs rampant in my family). However, I feel that the FM diagnosis is inadequately studied, which is a disservice to the patient. A lot of FM symptoms are chicken or the egg issues, and we need to study more. It's the only way to make progress and help our patients. So, I stand by my position on demographic similarites. When diagnosing a patient, we must look at the whole picture and maybe we can perform a root cause analysis and maybe even find a cure! Let's hope!
    I've had fibromyalgia for the last 7 years. I have been doing a lot of research on my own trying to find an underlying cause. "We don't know what it is..." just doesn't cut it for me. People have written on this thread they notice a correlation between FM and depression. I have depression, but I don't know if it's because I hurt all the time, or if the depression actually causes the pain.

    My doctor has been treating me with Lunesta for the last couple of years and that has reduced my pain level from about a 7 to, on most days, to a 3. I can handle it, but I do get exhausted quite easily. I have a level 7 pain about two to three back-to-back days a month. It seems to follow a pattern, but then the pattern changes. (The pain will come at the middle of the month for a few months, then it will change to the end of the month for another few months, then it will change again.) I have earned a Bachelor's degree in this time and am working on my BSN at the moment, so I am not incapacitated and am certainly not looking for disability - as some of the earlier posters have suggested they think other women with FM are doing. Pain medications do not work, so there is no use to drug seek. (Maybe, if one were zombied out that would relieve the pain, but what's the point in living like that? I guess one would have to be a drug addict to answer that question.)

    I'm thinking the cause may be hormonal. I think it may have a lot to do with a lack of Growth Hormone. GH is manufactured mainly in deep sleep. If you don't get there, it won't be made. High carbohydrate diets inhibit GH and high protein diets stimulate GH. Lack of GH causes general body aches and fatigue.

    A couple years ago, before I knew about GH, I tried the Adkins diet and I was amazed at how great I felt. I had absolutely no pain and I was my old energetic self again! I couldn't stay on the diet, though, and when the pain came back I convinced myself the pain relief was a fluke. Since learning about GH in A & P II, I have decided to do an expirement. I am going to start limiting my carb intake to see what effect it has. If there is no effect, I may try the "no-carb" thing again and see if I get the same results as before.

    All of this begs the question as to why I could eat whatever I wanted for 39 years and then this happen to me out of the blue. This makes me wonder if there is no dietary correlation. I did make one big change seven years ago, just prior to the onset of these symptoms - I quit smoking and gained 30 pounds. I am now 172 lbs., 5'7". Maybe, I eat more carbs than I used to? I don't know, but then what caused my sleeping problems? Eating carbs? It doesn't make sense. I'll let you know how my expirement goes.

    I'm also wondering if there is a correlation between fibromyalgia and PPI use. If anyone notices this, please, please, post your observations. I started using Prevacid 7 years ago, as well due to a hiatal hernia. This could be a likely suspect in that a recent study suggests PPIs inhibit calcium absorbtion. Low calcium does weird things to muscle tissue. I have tried to quit taking these, but I can't. I get stomach acid in my esophagus, nose and ears if I don't. Believe me, that is NOT fun. Another thing I would like to know, is if you notice a correlation between an elevated BMI and FM.

    For the doubters of fibromyalgia pain, let me tell you, it is very real and it is very disheartening not to know where it is coming from. Imagine having the flu, sans nasea and vomitting, everyday. That's what it feels like and it is even more disheartening to tell someone - especially a health professional - you have this disease and to have them look at you like your making it up, or to dismiss it outright because of their own ignorance of the disease and their own prejudices.
    Last edit by Miss Chybil RN on Jul 25, '07
  10. by   gr8rnpjt
    [QUOTE=granite109;2308645]OK, this is an old thread, but I feel a need to clarify, so please indulge me.

    I understand where you are coming from more clearly and I thank you for clarifying your previous post.
  11. by   gr8rnpjt
    [QUOTE=Miss_Chybil;2316208]I've had fibromyalgia for the last 7 years. I have been doing a lot of research on my own trying to find an underlying cause. Pain medications do not work, so there is no use to drug seek.

    You made some very good points. I am tempted to try the Adkins diet to see if it helps!
  12. by   gr8rnpjt
    Quote from teeituptom
    No I will just know Im really living, and I just now woke up a little while ago. Boy am I really alive.
    I was going to comment, but clearly nothing would get through.
  13. by   AndiERRN
    omg!!!! i so agree!!!! i'm sitting here reading these and thinking... my feet, calves and the back of my thighs still hurt from yesterday! and i was so tired last night i slept wrong on my right arm! do i have fm? no but i bet there are plenty of md's out there who would be happy to write me a script and label me!
    what i need to do is get off the computer and off my butt and go for a power walk and work out the kinks! but that's not everyone there are patients who have muscle aches and pains that are real and they don't need a quick label or to be judged.
    we see alot of patients in my er that are there for pain medication and when you ask for their history the first thing they list is fm. they also have run through several anti-depressants and anti-anxiety pills and "nothing seems to work any more" most of my co-workers just roll their eyes and say "drug seeker". that may be, but i try to have empathy and accept each one at face value. is the medical field feeding in to this by over diagnoising patients and just giving them the magic pill?
    i'm off for that walk now!!....
    andi errn

close