Do you arrest abusive patients? - page 5

We are having a debate on and off about whether or not to arrest someone who is abusive in the ED. Not someone who has assaulted a staff memeber...that's a "no brainer"...bye bye my... Read More

  1. by   septicwad
    If you have an obnoxious drug-seeking patient in the ER, get a positive identification on them and call the police department to see if they have any wants or warrants for arrest.
    Last edit by septicwad on May 4, '04
  2. by   stretch thin
    Where I work is in the bad part of town and to top it off we also have a behavioral hospital across the street from us. So you can only imagine what we get. Our security guards are limited to what they can do and for PD, oh that's a joke. Their the ones bringing them in. Anyway in cases where the patient is extremly verbally abuse, that's when you give them the 10 & 2. DEFINITION you ask 10mg of Haldol and 2 of Ativan. There wonderful drugs, unless the pt has been taking PCP. Nothing pulls those pts down. I had one doctor get so angry at a patient that was being verbally abuse, he intubated him and then he said TAKE THAT! We all busted up laughing. I know not nice, but it was funny
  3. by   GDog7NYC
    If a patient can yell and scream and me and my staff, then quite obviously, there's VERY minimal need for emergency care. We call security to escort them out of the ER and if they still refuse to leave, then we'll call our precinct to have them removed from the premises.
  4. by   teeituptom
    Quote from stretch thin
    Where I work is in the bad part of town and to top it off we also have a behavioral hospital across the street from us. So you can only imagine what we get. Our security guards are limited to what they can do and for PD, oh that's a joke. Their the ones bringing them in. Anyway in cases where the patient is extremly verbally abuse, that's when you give them the 10 & 2. DEFINITION you ask 10mg of Haldol and 2 of Ativan. There wonderful drugs, unless the pt has been taking PCP. Nothing pulls those pts down. I had one doctor get so angry at a patient that was being verbally abuse, he intubated him and then he said TAKE THAT! We all busted up laughing. I know not nice, but it was funny

    not even funny
  5. by   CHATSDALE
    I Work In A Mental Facility Nursing Home We Have No On Site Security We Frequently Have To Call In City Police To Assist With A Violent Resident Funny They Seem To Respect A Police Uniform They Usally Cooperate When Cops Come In
  6. by   Iam46yearsold
    I dont like violence in the ER.

    However I am in excellent physical shape. and have studied judo since I was young. But still I am carefull.
  7. by   Batman24
    Quote from heart queen
    My old facility's secutity had that hand's off approach. They were NOT allowed to TOUCH any patient, period. Well, here I am in the ICU with a 2PC (2 psyc. docs. legally commit them for 24 hours, peroid because they are a danger to self and others). Well, buddy, all 250 lbs of him tears off the tely, is in my face fist raised demanding to leave, security is called and all they can do it stand there ******* their pants??

    I give the patient the official wave to the elevator while smiling. !!!!

    When the hospital is serious about my safety, I'll be serious about keeping their patient where he needs to be. And I won't be lifting up the near by walker to stirr up trouble either

    NOw, have had an impatient, A&Ox3 tell me the SO was waiting for me outside to kick my *** because I wouldn't change vistation. I called the sheriff, pressed charges against both. The sheriff, came explained to the patient, who then sincerely groveled. I held my charges, the patient was arrested at discharge, I appeared at court, and the patient convicted.

    Meanwhile, hospital admin got involved, explained to me why I was over reacting, although they couldn't guarentee my safety to the car... and politely and firmly told me to drop the charges, which I didn't.

    so no, hospitals don't back you up, the law does.... use it.. but know those little stinkers in administration have no memory loss when review time comes.

    But it's worth it, God love those administration stinkers, they learned their lesson, when an employees purse was snatched walking to her car, she was beat to a pulp and sued. and won
    Bravo!! I hate to read about hospitals who always blame the victim and try to pressure them to drop charges, etc. It's disgusting. Good for you for staying the course and protecting yourself and other medical staff for the future. Maybe another nurse, doctor, etc. will follow your lead next time they are threatened or abused as well.
  8. by   Iam46yearsold
    I have had a few arrested.
  9. by   nursemike
    Quote from RNin92
    See, I think that the situations like Mike was talking about with the neuro pts is just exactly the time security SHOULD get involved. It's a medical problem causing a dangerous situation and should be handled by healthcare providers with assistance from security to keep everyone safe.

    The drunks that are brought in who don't have a thing wrong, except their BAL, who swear, swing and threaten...

    Bye Bye...
    I'm calling PD every time now when one gets abusive.
    If they are able to "swear, swing and threaten" I'm guessing that they won't be stopping spontaneous respirations anytime soon...no matter WHAT the BAL!!!

    It's interesting to see this thread after a few years, and a big change in perspective going from unlicensed to RN. As a nurse, I far prefer to handle my own confused/combative patients, as long as it can be done safely. I have called security when the patient was too big and too combative, and asked them to send at least three officers. The three officers and I were able to bring overwhelming force to bear, which in that instance was safer for all, including the patient. More often, though, it's possible to de-escalate the situation gently. Every so often, we get a security officer who is more oriented to law enforcement than patient care, and while they don't seem to last long, I hate to take the risk. Sometimes just the uniform is enough to set someone off--though I've seen others go docile as soon as they see security. I really like the ones who hang back a little and stay out of sight, but are close by if they're needed.

    We did call the police about an AOX3 patient who threatened a nurse. They weren't much help at all. The patient was 17, and they said there would be no point arresting him. A security officer came and had a stern talk with him, but the little snot knew he could pretty much get away with anything short of murder.
    That was a couple of years ago. I assume he's in prison, now.
  10. by   mmutk
    Oddly enough we sent one out today in handcuffs to tha jail. It was his third visit in a week and finally we had enough and they took him for disorderly conduct.

    He was drunk and abusive to staff and visitors.
  11. by   Iam46yearsold
    I handle these patients quite often and I have learned that I can deal with them quite effectively. I am by nature a very calm individual. But I have dealt with some who crossed "The Line" and then yes, I have no issues in seeing them get arrested. Do I take pleasure or satisfaction from doing this no. But they set themselves up for it.

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