ABG rule of 15

  1. [color=#ccff33]n

    i went to a conference on abg way back and the person spoke about the rule of 15 stating:



    [color=#ccff33]nhco3 + 15 = pco2 +/- 2
    [color=#cc6600]nif it does, appropriate compensation has occurred and there is no secondary process
    [color=#cc6600]nif it doesn’t, another primary process is at work
    [color=#0099cc]nif co2 too low = respiratory alkalosis
    [color=#0099cc]nif co2 too high = respiratory acidosis

    anyone would know where i could find the source of that rule ?thank you!
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   avery
    How about using the ROME rules?
    Resp is opposite
    Metabolic is equal
    This applies to the arrows and whether they go the same way or opposite ways in regards to pH AND Co2.
    It cannot be compensated if the pH is not normal, it can be compensating.
    Hope this makes sense.
    Avery
  4. by   phiposurde
    Quote from avery
    How about using the ROME rules?
    Resp is opposite
    Metabolic is equal
    This applies to the arrows and whether they go the same way or opposite ways in regards to pH AND Co2.
    It cannot be compensated if the pH is not normal, it can be compensating.
    Hope this makes sense.
    Avery
    Good rule but can trick you when there more then one process in progress.
  5. by   gwenith
    My fave is for every one millmetre change in the PCO2 the ph will change by .01 in the opposite direction.

    Taught that by an Intensivist and have used it ever since.
  6. by   loafin'
    Quote from phiposurde
    [color=#ccff33]n

    i went to a conference on abg way back and the person spoke about the rule of 15 stating:



    [color=#ccff33]nhco3 + 15 = pco2 +/- 2
    [color=#cc6600]nif it does, appropriate compensation has occurred and there is no secondary process
    [color=#cc6600]nif it doesn't, another primary process is at work

    [color=#0099cc]nif co2 too low = respiratory alkalosis
    [color=#0099cc]nif co2 too high = respiratory acidosis

    anyone would know where i could find the source of that rule ?thank you!
    it is actually called winter's formula.
    bicarb x 1.5 + 8= expected paco2 +/-2
  7. by   teeituptom
    never heard of that but too old too learn

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