Your opinion of the DNP

  1. 2
    I happened to be on my alma mater's website, and I noticed that they have completely gotten rid of all of their MSN level Nurse Practitioner programs and have turned them into a DNP. I'm assuming this is because of the recommendation of the AACN, however I was not under the impression it was required at this time. I quickly did some research of other local nursing schools and found that they are still offering the degree at an MSN level.

    So, I can't help but look at this situation and think that this is just the school trying to get more tuition money from people. I personally have no desire to pursue a DNP and I think it's because I don't feel like it will make me a better bedside clinician. For lack of a better way to say this; the curriculum seems geared towards the 'academic type' and not the 'clinician type'. But, I think I need to do some more research so I have a few questions:

    1. In your area are the nursing schools transitioning the NP from an MSN to a required DNP?
    2. If you are an MSN prepared NP are you pursuing or considering pursuing a DNP? If yes, why?

    I look forward to hearing others thoughts on this matter.
    LiLoRN and Joe V like this.
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  4. 16 Comments so far...

  5. 13
    I didn't write this (another person did on this website - I apologize I didn't keep the name of who), but I thought it was brilliant so I saved it. I'll repost it here for those who didn't see the initial thread.
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    My ideal DNP program would have separate courses (with their associated pharmacology) in:

    1. Cardiology (with teaching how to read a 12 lead)
    2. Radiology (extensive teaching on reading xrays and CTs/MRIs)
    3. Pulmonology
    4. Renal
    5. Surgery (optional--pick one: general, ortho, etc)
    6. Elective (OB-GYn, peds, pain, primary care, etc.)

    In addition, I would say add an advanced differential diagnosis course, a course dedicated to the prescribing of controlled substances (since some jurisdictions have a problem with this), a pain management course and an advanced psych course dealing with chemical dependency (re: drug seekers) and a specific course on when and how to make proper referrals.

    I realize this starts to sound similar to medical school but unfortunately, those pushing the DNP are stating that "Dr. Nurse" is equivalent to "Dr. Doctor". So advanced practice nurses need to have some of that material if they are to fill the primary care void.

    I feel like the bottom line with the DNP is that it is a back handed way to get more academics, not improve practice. It is an academic wolf in clinical sheep's clothing. That doesn't make it a bad degree, but certainly not what is needed. But, no one will listen because it makes sense. To the powers that be, sensibility and practicality are for fools. Ivory towers for the elite
    Soon2bAGNP, Cessna172, nyteshade, and 10 others like this.
  6. 2
    Post above was originally by oldiebutgoodie (http://allnurses.com/nurse-practitio...04-page15.html)

    (thank you for finding this for me)
    reedmiranda53 and sirI like this.
  7. 4
    Just as it has gone from Diploma to Associate, Associate to BSN. While there are still diploma programs that are functioning and can sit for boards and the Associate nurse while passing the same nursing broad as the BSN....is now being told "Have a BSN or you won't be considered". Is the BSN truly better than the ASN both fresh out of school? The move towards academics hasn't necessarily improved the bedside clinical practice of the bedside RN. When I graduated nursing school the NP was the BSN level. (I knew I was making a mistake back then and not going right back to school)

    Aren't all the programs perpetuated by academia to throw more money back at the professors and colleges? There is no sure fire better way to keep your teaching position is to assure that more teaching is required to teach the subject you are teaching.
    prettymica, reedmiranda53, nursel56, and 1 other like this.
  8. 6
    I'm in the MSN program now at my Alma Mater for my FNP, the school has just gotten a DNP program with 7 guinea pigs in it now. The program is 2 years full time course work after getting the MSN. At first I thought I would want to begin the DNP program soon after graduating, I'd be 24 upon graduation so why not??? But now after reading a lot of research and opinions from this site, I'm leaning towards just getting my MSN and that's it. I agree with above posters that the DNP curriculum at this point will not make me a better clinician. Even if the curriculum was changed it would take years to enforce so therefore by that time I'd probably have enough experience and not need to courses. Its such a connundrum because I want to support education in nursing but I feel if a degree does not provide what I feel to need to be a better clinician then why waste my money. Now maybe I'll want to state I have a doctorate someday, but really if I'm not a professor, who would acknowledge it. I'd never be "Dr. so and so" in practice so what's the point??? I'm interested in the other reponses to this thread.
    MandaRN94, LiLoRN, prettymica, and 3 others like this.
  9. 1
    I guess regardless of your opinion, after 2015 it will be the new standard in NPs. While not required to sit for examination yet, that is coming down the pipeline fast.
    reedmiranda53 likes this.
  10. 5
    You know, people said the same thing in the 70s about the BSN... Only a very small percentage of MSN programs have even started developing DNP programs. It won't be happening for a long time.

    Quote from mmutk
    I guess regardless of your opinion, after 2015 it will be the new standard in NPs. While not required to sit for examination yet, that is coming down the pipeline fast.
    TexeCuter, LiLoRN, prettymica, and 2 others like this.
  11. 0
    Last year I attended an information session for the MSN FNP program at a small, but well respected private catholic college. The speaker stated that the school did not offer a DNP for NPs and had no plans or interest to do so. She said the FNP is meant to be a cost effective provider of high qualiety primary care and the DNP just dramaticaly increased to cost of FNP education and was thus counter productive. It was pointed out that there is no evidence at all that current MSN prepared FNPs training was lacking. She also said that if the day ever comes where a DNP is required to sit for boards the school would simply drop it's FNP program all together and might consider a masters PA program in it's place. The college grants no doctorate degrees in any area of study and I got the impression that for some reason they could not do so.
  12. 2
    Quote from mmutk
    I guess regardless of your opinion, after 2015 it will be the new standard in NPs. While not required to sit for examination yet, that is coming down the pipeline fast.
    When I started working on my master's in 2008 people were saying this same thing but for 2012. It's not a requirement yet for 2015 and I don't see it happening for a long time.
    LiLoRN and prettymica like this.
  13. 0
    1. In your area are the nursing schools transitioning the NP from an MSN to a required DNP?
    Yes; my school "got rid" of the MSN a couple years ago, requiring everybody to enter as a DNP candidate. However, you receive your MSN along the way and many students (including myself) will stop at that point.

    2. If you are an MSN prepared NP are you pursuing or considering pursuing a DNP? If yes, why?
    At this point in my career, absolutely not. I am swimming in financial aid debt and am looking forward to working as an NP. I just can't fathom paying for more schooling that will not increase my salary or my chances of finding a job. Maybe down the road I will consider it. I will, however, strongly consider getting my post-master's in another specialty.


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