Ok, so I'm soon an FNP... what about a DNP in acute care? | allnurses

Ok, so I'm soon an FNP... what about a DNP in acute care?

  1. 0 Now that I'm wrapping up my final semester as a FNP student, I'm realiy wanting to work in the ER/ICU.

    What are my options?

    I've looked into Acute Care DNP. Is that a good direction to go in a few years?

    I just resigned from my ICU job this week. Will this affect my ability to enter any prorgrams?
  2. 19 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  traumaRUs profile page
    0
    Hey congratulations on your upcoming graduation.

    As to further education - what do the ERs/ICUs hire in your area? That seems to be the key to these jobs.
  4. Visit  CrazyPremed profile page
    0
    This a great question that I myself have been wondering...I'm starting an RN-BSN program in Jan, and and planning my career after that.

    My question to you is, why do you want to continue on the ACNP? Is that what most ER NP's have in your area? Where I live, the FNP is desired because many of the ER midlevels work in the Fast Track area and need to see all ages. Even the trauma NP's here are mainly FNP's (that I've seen) because they medically manage patients more that performing invasive procedures. I have seen postings for ACNP's at hospitals also but these are primarily for the surgical services.

    Also, - to the OP - why not a Post Masters Certificate instead of the DNP? How was your FNP program? Do you feel ready to work? Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

    CrazyPremed
  5. Visit  yellow finch profile page
    0
    Quote from traumaRUs
    Hey congratulations on your upcoming graduation.

    As to further education - what do the ERs/ICUs hire in your area? That seems to be the key to these jobs.
    The ERs are still hesitant in my area to hire NPs. One local hospital has a PA that works the afternoon shift. The ICUs, however, are present in many of the larger hospitals in town.

    I'm looking at a post-master's certificate in ACNP but I don't want to wait too long before applying for this. Going for the DNP just made me wonder if I would be "more" qualified for these jobs later one.

    I'm so confused as to what to do!
  6. Visit  KatieRN04 profile page
    0
    I have wondered the same thing. I will have a MSN with a FNP. However, if the DNP does truly take off and people buy into it, then I wonder if other stake holders like Medicare will require the DNP for billing. I imagine that there will be grandfather effects taken for certain aspects, but I wonder about the DNP in acute care also.
  7. Visit  carachel2 profile page
    1
    I don't know...I've looked at the class requirements for a few DNP programs and they seem so heavily research and theory based I can't imagine that a degree would result in more clinical competency and peer (i.e. MD, PA, etc.) respect. I would consider a post-masters certification in Acute before I did a DNP. The new L.A.C.E. model allows for a residency in your specialty, but I've heard any updates on that recently.
    CrazyPremed likes this.
  8. Visit  juan de la cruz profile page
    0
    Quote from yellow finch
    I'm looking at a post-master's certificate in ACNP but I don't want to wait too long before applying for this. Going for the DNP just made me wonder if I would be "more" qualified for these jobs later on.
    I personally don't think it will make a difference whether you have a DNP or not. A post-master's ACNP certificate program will allow you to be eligible for ACNP certification already and that in itself makes you more marketable as a dual FNP-ACNP nurse practitioner. And again, it's already been discussed previously that all NP's prepared at the master's degree level are going to be grandfathered if the DNP becomes mandatory.

    Your original question was asking about Acute Care DNP programs. You'll have to go through all the schools listed in the AACN DNP program list and find out which institutions listed offer an ACNP track (http://www.aacn.nche.edu/dnp/DNPProgramList.htm). The schools in the list that offer an ACNP program may allow you to complete a post-master's certificate leading to ACNP. Depending on the program requirements, you may get credit for FNP courses you've taken since adults are already covered in your Advanced Patho, Pharm, and Health Assessment courses. You may end up just needing the 3 semesters of acute care didactics and clinical rotations but I'm not positive on this. After you've finished the ACNP component and sat for the ACNP boards, the next step would be to continue on to the DNP courses leading towards your practice doctorate degree.

    But as you may already notice, you really do not need to attend the same school for your post-master's ACNP and DNP programs.
  9. Visit  yellow finch profile page
    1
    Quote from CrazyPremed
    This a great question that I myself have been wondering...I'm starting an RN-BSN program in Jan, and and planning my career after that.

    My question to you is, why do you want to continue on the ACNP? Is that what most ER NP's have in your area? Where I live, the FNP is desired because many of the ER midlevels work in the Fast Track area and need to see all ages. Even the trauma NP's here are mainly FNP's (that I've seen) because they medically manage patients more that performing invasive procedures. I have seen postings for ACNP's at hospitals also but these are primarily for the surgical services.

    Also, - to the OP - why not a Post Masters Certificate instead of the DNP? How was your FNP program? Do you feel ready to work? Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

    CrazyPremed
    Now that I'm completing my program, there is little opportunity to round through the hospital as the FNP program I'm in forces me to complete hours primarily within a Family Practice/Internal Medicine office. I've also discovered that the office bores me to no end and I can't see myself working in one.

    So far, I know of a couple of hospitals that hire mid-levels in the ER but they are mainly PAs. *sigh* Time to change that.

    As for my FNP program, yes, I feel (on the whole) ready to practice. I've also put out the word to a specific group that I'm available to round, as a RN, with the MDs in order to learn the job better. It may not be my first choice for employment in the ned, but it will be excellent experience.

    Any further questions? I'm happy to answer them!
    CrazyPremed likes this.
  10. Visit  yellow finch profile page
    0
    And thanks to everyone who responded. I suppose it's hard to find a good medium and "level of respect" amongst MDs with the graduate level of education and a doctoral degree.

    My issue... suppose I'll keep thinking about it and make a decision later on.
  11. Visit  Therapist4Chnge profile page
    0
    It is important to not only figure out if a DNP will meet your needs, but also if you can find a program with the right classwork.

    I'd say if you want advanced clinical training, then the DNP may not meet your needs....as the focus seems to be on management, theory, and some other loosely related topics. I haven't seen much of a research focus, which is a shame....but I guess that would put it closer to what a Ph.D. in Nursing would be expected to complete.

    carachel2, I'm curious what DNP you found that is more research oriented...as I've seen most don't really get into the research aspect of things.
  12. Visit  ANPFNPGNP profile page
    0
    Quote from yellow finch
    The ERs are still hesitant in my area to hire NPs. One local hospital has a PA that works the afternoon shift. The ICUs, however, are present in many of the larger hospitals in town.

    I'm looking at a post-master's certificate in ACNP but I don't want to wait too long before applying for this. Going for the DNP just made me wonder if I would be "more" qualified for these jobs later one.

    I'm so confused as to what to do!
    If you finished the DNP, would that qualify you to take the ACNP exam?
  13. Visit  juan de la cruz profile page
    0
    Quote from ANPFNPGNP
    If you finished the DNP, would that qualify you to take the ACNP exam?
    Just completing the DNP degree without having gone through the corresponding ACNP coursework required by either ANCC or AACN (Amer Assoc of Crit Care Nurses) does not make one eligible to sit for any of the two ACNP certification exams.

    There are BSN to DNP programs in a few nursing schools that offer the option of an ACNP track in addition to the other NP specialty concentrations such as FNP, ANP, PNP, and so on. However, I don't see how these programs will apply to the OP as she would have already gotten a master's degree with her FNP.
  14. Visit  Hekate profile page
    1
    Quote from yellow finch
    Now that I'm completing my program, there is little opportunity to round through the hospital as the FNP program I'm in forces me to complete hours primarily within a Family Practice/Internal Medicine office. I've also discovered that the office bores me to no end and I can't see myself working in one.

    So far, I know of a couple of hospitals that hire mid-levels in the ER but they are mainly PAs. *sigh* Time to change that.

    As for my FNP program, yes, I feel (on the whole) ready to practice. I've also put out the word to a specific group that I'm available to round, as a RN, with the MDs in order to learn the job better. It may not be my first choice for employment in the ned, but it will be excellent experience.

    Any further questions? I'm happy to answer them!

    Hello Yellow Finch,

    One of my colleagues graduated from the FNP program (university of Michigan-flint) about 7 months ago and got hired by a group of Neuro surgeons. They are training her for first assist on all neuro procedures, trained her to read cat scans, insert ICP drains/monitor etc....
    She works with her conterpart to cover the group needs-He is a PA and they do exactly the same job.
    I think safe to say that she never considered a career in a PCP office even though she went for the FNP program. She seems thrilled with her role!
    I suppose each hospital has their own guidelines about the role that a NP plays within the hospital, but my understanding is that the surgeons who hired her through the hospital in the first place (she is considered to be employed by the hospital,not by the surgeon's group, but for their needs) are the ones deciding of her responsabilities and training her accordingly. They obviously want someone who could be on call for them and cover all neuro traumas, able to read images and call them once she judges the surgeon's presence to be required. Until then, she still has a lot of autonomy in decision making as well as performing invasive procedures. If the surgeon needs to come in, she will assist him in the ER, OR or ICU. On a daily basis, she also rounds with them and scrubs in for elective and emergency procedures.

    I just thought you might find her experience interesting and hope it will open new prospects to you.
    Keep us posted on your progress
    J-
    Kensington likes this.

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