Master of Public Health looking for fastest/best route to DNP

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    Is anyone knowledgeable about how MSN and DNP programs view the different routes to the RN in terms of having a strong application to grad school? I have an Master of Public Health and a strong work history in public health. Would I be viewed as competitive with an ADN or should I go for a postbac RN or a Master's level RN? I need no pre-reqs for the ADN, but still need 4-5 for the other two options. I want both the quickest (I'm 41) and surest route. Thanks!:heartbeat
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  4. 5 Comments so far...

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    First of all, let me congratulate you on your MPH and long history of working in public health. The fields of nursing and public health work very well together, in my opinion.

    Ok, I will try to explain this as best I can....

    ADN: 2 year way to RN

    BSN: 4 year way to RN

    If you want to go to graduate school in nursing (for MSN, DNP as you mentioned) you must have a BSN. If you have a bachelor's degree in another field there are programs where you can get your BSN in a year. I would recommend this if you see yourself wanting to advance in the field or have job options outside of the hospital. If there is a nursing school in your area it wouldn't hurt to go talk with them.

    Good luck!
  6. 0
    Quote from mabeltoo
    Is anyone knowledgeable about how MSN and DNP programs view the different routes to the RN in terms of having a strong application to grad school? I have an Master of Public Health and a strong work history in public health. Would I be viewed as competitive with an ADN or should I go for a postbac RN or a Master's level RN? I need no pre-reqs for the ADN, but still need 4-5 for the other two options. I want both the quickest (I'm 41) and surest route. Thanks!:heartbeat
    Quickest is a MEPN program then DNP (there is probably a DEPN program out there somewhere). Surest is a different story. Depending on the area you may not be able get a position as an NP with an MEPN degree.

    David Carpenter, PA-C
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    Depending on where you live, there are "grad entry" DNP options that you might look into. Those are programs for people who hold a BA/BS in another field. The first year or so is the pre-licensure (RN) portion and the rest is graduate school. I know that Case Western Reserve in Cleveland has that program, and I am sure there are others.

    You can also choose to get your ADN and then apply to an RN-MSN program. Many universities offer admission to their MSN programs without a BSN--having a MPH would certainly be an asset!

    Good luck with your decision!
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    At some schools you can get a BSN through an 18 month accelerated program. That is the route I went. Just be aware that an accelerated nursing program will make your master's work seem like kindergarten. It is really intense!
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    Thanks for all the feedback! I would love to apply to direct entry programs, and don't know why Minnesota doesn't offer them. I have small kids and extended family here, so moving isn't a good option for us. I'm wondering about the ADN and then the RN-MSN bridge.... I have 2 questions about the ADN, actually: 1) As graduate programs shift from the MSN to the DNP, will the RN-MSN bridge programs be phased out? And if so, do folks think RN-DNP programs will be created? and 2) Would having an ADN allow me to be competitive as an applicant to full DNP programs, or would I need to get a BSN (even though I already have a BA a in non-nursing field and an MPH)? It's all so confusing!


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