Vaccine Conspiracy Theorists More Likely To See Conspiracy Everywhere - page 7

"Where do climate change deniers, anti-GMO activists, and vaccine conspiracy theorists overlap one another? According to a recent study, described in Mother Jones, they seem to triangulate on a tendency to believe in... Read More

  1. 0
    Quote from wtbcrna
    Paul Offit is a pediatrician, infectious disease expert, and vaccine expert and has decades of education/research in all of those subjects.
    Really? He has decades of education and research on autism? Can you show me something to substantiate that? Has he ever even treated an individual with autism?

    Quote from wtbcrna
    Autism was brought up and ASD is most commonly associated with MMR vaccination. It has been proven with or without vaccinations that ASD rates are the same.
    Indeed it is, but I was not talking about it. Maybe one day we can. Feel free to discuss what I mentioned. Or don't. Either way, fine by me.

    Quote from wtbcrna
    And gluten free diets through meta-analysis/literature reviews have not panned out in CS patients. You are not reviewing articles you are simply looking at abstracts which is often misleading. And again if you think they are pertinent articles then you should post them.
    Abstracts can be misleading, which is why I said I would try to take the time to read a few full studies when I had the time. Sorry I haven't had the time yet. I'll get on it as soon as I can. Promise.

    Quote from wtbcrna
    I am saying there is no link between vaccines and autism. I think that is pretty plain.
    No, you weren't pretty plain, hence my question. Your statement reflected a clear lack of knowledge concerning how the CDC collects its data on the autism prevalence numbers. Unless you are referring to some sort of data that says vaccine compliance was in decline in say 2002 (with relation to the latest numbers), your statement of "In general vaccines administration to children in the United States has gone down and ASD diagnosis has continued to rise" is woefully ignorant of the process. Do I have to provide peer-review science to back that up or is your deliberate dodge of that factoid as close to an admission of being wrong on something I should ever expect to receive from you?


    Quote from wtbcrna
    Provide some peer-reviewed scientific evidence to debate. You haven't provided anything of substance to debate that has not been disproven over and over again.
    Would you like me to link to something that states that the increase cannot be fully attributable to better diagnosis? Because I'm pretty sure that's the only claim I've made.

    Here's Thomas Insel's commentary:

    NIMH Autism Prevalence: More Affected or More Detected?

    You can link to the studies referenced at the bottom of the page and have a ball with them if you're so inclined.
    Last edit by Nurseworks on Apr 19

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  2. 0
    Quote from Nurseworks
    Really? He has decades of education and research on autism? Can you show me something to substantiate that? Has he ever even treated an individual with autism?



    Indeed it is, but I was not talking about it. Maybe one day we can. Feel free to discuss what I mentioned. Or don't. Either way, fine by me.



    Abstracts can be misleading, which is why I said I would try to take the time to read a few full studies when I had the time. Sorry I haven't had the time yet. I'll get on it as soon as I can. Promise.



    No, you weren't pretty plain, hence my question. Your statement reflected a clear lack of knowledge concerning how the CDC collects its data on the autism prevalence numbers. Unless you are referring to some sort of data that says vaccine compliance was in decline in say 2002 (with relation to the latest numbers), your statement of "In general vaccines administration to children in the United States has gone down and ASD diagnosis has continued to rise" is woefully ignorant of the process. Do I have to provide peer-review science to back that up or is your deliberate dodge of that factoid as close to an admission of being wrong on something I should ever expect to receive from you?




    Would you like me to link to something that states that the increase cannot be fully attributable to better diagnosis? Because I'm pretty sure that's the only claim I've made.

    Here's Thomas Insel's commentary:

    NIMH Autism Prevalence: More Affected or More Detected?

    You can link to the studies referenced at the bottom of the page and have a ball with them if you're so inclined.
    I never stated he was an expert on Autism, but Offit is a pediatrician and I am sure he has treated more than his fair share of autistic children. It is nearly impossible to be in the healthcare field and not treat an autistic child.

    The author states, "[COLOR=#000000]Our working assumption is that there are both more children affected and more detected.". I do believe this is possible even though there isn't any current research that can say for sure that this true, and there probably will not be until we know exactly what things can and do cause ASD.[/COLOR]
    [COLOR=#000000]There still isn't one peer-reviewed scientific article that has shown that vaccines are attributable an increase in ASD. [/COLOR]
  3. 0
    Quote from wtbcrna
    I never stated he was an expert on Autism, but Offit is a pediatrician and I am sure he has treated more than his fair share of autistic children. It is nearly impossible to be in the healthcare field and not treat an autistic child.
    As big a fan of his that you care, I would think that you'd be able to reference something in one of his books, particularly the one with "autism" in the title, where he talks about treating kiddos with autism. Does he even practice as a pediatrician anymore?
  4. 0
    Quote from Nurseworks
    As big a fan of his that you care, I would think that you'd be able to reference something in one of his books, particularly the one with "autism" in the title, where he talks about treating kiddos with autism. Does he even practice as a pediatrician anymore?
    Paul A. Offit | The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Yes, he still works as an infectious disease physician/ pediatrician. Autism's False Prophets - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia I believe this is the book you are addressing and it is almost solely about the MMR vaccine and autism link myths which I think anyone can say he would be an expert in d/t his formal training and research.


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