What exactly means diuresis?

  1. 0
    I always thought diuresis means normal excretion of urine, but practically every single online dictionary (Merriam Webster, dictionary.com) says diuresis is increased excretion of urine. But the term for excessive urination is polyuria. I really don't think diuresis and polyuria are synonyms.

    Any thoughts about the exact definition?
  2. Get our hottest nursing topics delivered to your inbox.

  3. 1,866 Visits
    Find Similar Topics
  4. 28 Comments so far...

  5. 0
    I thought polyuria was more like urinating an excessive number of times. And I always thought diuresis was more like when you give lasix and the amount of urine increases.
  6. 0
    Polyuria is very specific term, which is defined as excreting more than 3 liters of urine per day (in adults), so this is about increased daily volume of urine, which of course results in increased frequency of urination. On the other hand, increased frequency of urination by itself, for example, in urinary tract infection, does not result in increased urine volume. I understand the term polyuria clearly, but I'm just confused what exactly diuresis means. I actually believe diuresis is a physiological term that means (normal) urine production in the kidneys. The problem is that virtually all online dictionaries explain diuresis as increased urination.
  7. 0
    But what about when they say the patient needs to be "diuresed"? I thought this meant they need to get the excess fluid off them.
  8. 1
    Well, OK, "diuresed" is probably not an official term; I mean you can't use the jargon of the medical staff for definitions.
    loriangel14 likes this.
  9. 5
    Quote from healthresearch
    Polyuria is very specific term, which is defined as excreting more than 3 liters of urine per day (in adults), so this is about increased daily volume of urine, which of course results in increased frequency of urination. On the other hand, increased frequency of urination by itself, for example, in urinary tract infection, does not result in increased urine volume. I understand the term polyuria clearly, but I'm just confused what exactly diuresis means. I actually believe diuresis is a physiological term that means (normal) urine production in the kidneys. The problem is that virtually all online dictionaries explain diuresis as increased urination.
    Diuresis refers to the process of increased urine production, often from an inadequate level to an adequate one. When I was a surgical nurse, our patients would often have a low urine output in the immediate post surgical period (200-300 ml per 8 hours was common). Then over the next couple of days, the patient's output could increase to 1000-1500 ml per shift. That increase is what's referred to as diuresis. Administering diuretics also causes diuresis. The general idea is that the body increases fluid excretion to remove excess fluid. Polyuria refers to an excessive production of urine, such as occurs with diabetes. Just as the words "increased" and "excessive" aren't synonymous, neither are the terms "diuresis" and "polyuria".
  10. 2
    Quote from healthresearch
    I actually believe diuresis is a physiological term that means (normal) urine production in the kidneys. The problem is that virtually all online dictionaries explain diuresis as increased urination.
    Not to be blunt, but the dictionaries are correct.
    ausrnurse and LadyFree28 like this.
  11. 0
    Quote from kdunurse
    Diuresis refers to the process of increased urine production, often from an inadequate level to an adequate one. When I was a surgical nurse, our patients would often have a low urine output in the immediate post surgical period (200-300 ml per 8 hours was common). Then over the next couple of days, the patient's output could increase to 1000-1500 ml per shift. That increase is what's referred to as diuresis. Administering diuretics also causes diuresis. The general idea is that the body increases fluid excretion to remove excess fluid. Polyuria refers to an excessive production of urine, such as occurs with diabetes. Just as the words "increased" and "excessive" aren't synonymous, neither are the terms "diuresis" and "polyuria".
    I have at least 2 reasons to believe diuresis means only urine production and not increased urine production.

    1. Google search site:gov "increased diuresis" gives over 7,000 results, mostly pubmed articles. By an obvious logic, using just "diuresis" here would mean (normal) urination.

    2. Etymonline explains diuresis as originating from Greek diourein, which means urination. The word diourein does not contain anything what would suggest "more" or "increased."
  12. 0
    Diuresis is an increase in the production of urine by the kidneys, which typically results in a corresponding increase in urine expelled by the body. When it happens without an accompanying increase of urination can cause severe medical problems. It has a wide range of causes and an assortment of treatment approaches, when treatment is required.

    There are several different types of diuresis, and it can be important to identify which type a patient is suffering from. In osmotic diuresis, for example, substances build up in the tubules of the kidneys, interfering with the reabsorption of water and causing an elevated level of water in the bloodstream, which in turn causes the kidneys to increase urine output. In rebound diuresis, patients produce a large amount of urine as they recover from renal failure. It can also be caused by exposure to cold or prolonged submersion, in which case it is known as immersion diuresis, as the body constricts blood vessels to conserve heat, leading the kidneys to produce more urine.
  13. 1
    Quote from healthresearch
    I have at least 2 reasons to believe diuresis means only urine production and not increased urine production.

    1. Google search site:gov "increased diuresis" gives over 7,000 results, mostly pubmed articles. By an obvious logic, using just "diuresis" here would mean (normal) urination.
    By OBVIOUS logic???

    Do you actually look at what context diuresis was use in EACH article?

    2. Etymonline explains diuresis as originating from Greek diourein, which means urination. The word diourein does not contain anything what would suggest "more" or "increased."
    Um, last time I checked, roots of words are what they are; also, I didn't know we were still speaking Greek.

    Pardon my views, but why are you debating this, when in your previous post, you stated the meaning from a Dictionary:


    Quote from healthresearch
    I always thought diuresis means normal excretion of urine, but practically every single online dictionary (Merriam Webster, dictionary.com) says diuresis is increased excretion of urine. But the term for excessive urination is polyuria. I really don't think diuresis and polyuria are synonyms.

    Any thoughts about the exact definition?
    and then, educated professionals give you the exact confirmation AND examples of the meaning? I am extremely curious.
    psu_213 likes this.


Top