Should I quit my ICU job? - page 2

by StellaMarisRN

Hello Everyone, I am a new grad nurse going into my fourth month in the ICU. So far, I'm grateful to have made it this far and I get along with my coworkers, patients, physicians, and other staff workers. I just have a few... Read More


  1. 0
    Wow, thanks everyone for the great replies! You all have some amazing stories and advice and they're really helpful!

    I guess that I should have mentioned before-my preceptor was always like this from the start. Unfortunately, she did not teach me a lot of the basics so I'm working on those along with the new things. She actually leaves the floor a lot to go to the cafeteria or call her boyfriend and sometimes she won't tell me where she's going.

    In the past, whenever the nurse educator entered the unit, she and my preceptor would go into a corner to "chat" about my progress, none of which I was invited to be a part of, but I'd hear them laughing and mentioning that I was a "slow learner." When I'd ask to be a part of the conversation, my nurse educator would make a snarky comment and my preceptor would roll her eyes. I'd have to pretend that I didn't care but it didn't make for the best learning environment. They acted like two high schoolers with their actions. Unfortunately, now that I've stood my ground and requested for a progress meeting between the three of us, my educator is nowhere to be found.

    The good news is that with each and every day that goes by, I'm not having to ask my preceptor or anyone else to help me as much. I actually had an emergency situation yesterday with a vent patient being weaned off of Diprivan who got upset, pulled on her NG tube, and ended up dislodging it a little and choking on her tube feeding. I was able to handle it on my own...thank God...because there was an emergency next door which all of the other nurses were taking care of and my preceptor was out to lunch.

    I have decided this evening that instead of giving up or feeling lost, I'm going to ask to work with a different person or a few other people who have requested to work with me. I'm just going to tell my preceptor that I'm interested in learning the different styles of the other nurses. Do you all think that this will "go over" okay or do you think that she'll take it too personally? Should I even care?

    Thanks again!

    ~Stella
  2. 1
    Think about your survival first. If it helps, the first six months I wanted to quit my CVICU job every day. After a year, it was once a week. Two years, once a month. Between 5 and 10 years I was in a groove and pretty content. After 10 ... GET ME OUT OF HERE!
    DizzyLizzyNurse likes this.
  3. 0
    Quote from StellaMarisRN
    Wow, thanks everyone for the great replies! You all have some amazing stories and advice and they're really helpful!

    I guess that I should have mentioned before-my preceptor was always like this from the start. Unfortunately, she did not teach me a lot of the basics so I'm working on those along with the new things. She actually leaves the floor a lot to go to the cafeteria or call her boyfriend and sometimes she won't tell me where she's going.

    In the past, whenever the nurse educator entered the unit, she and my preceptor would go into a corner to "chat" about my progress, none of which I was invited to be a part of, but I'd hear them laughing and mentioning that I was a "slow learner." When I'd ask to be a part of the conversation, my nurse educator would make a snarky comment and my preceptor would roll her eyes. I'd have to pretend that I didn't care but it didn't make for the best learning environment. They acted like two high schoolers with their actions. Unfortunately, now that I've stood my ground and requested for a progress meeting between the three of us, my educator is nowhere to be found.

    The good news is that with each and every day that goes by, I'm not having to ask my preceptor or anyone else to help me as much. I actually had an emergency situation yesterday with a vent patient being weaned off of Diprivan who got upset, pulled on her NG tube, and ended up dislodging it a little and choking on her tube feeding. I was able to handle it on my own...thank God...because there was an emergency next door which all of the other nurses were taking care of and my preceptor was out to lunch.

    I have decided this evening that instead of giving up or feeling lost, I'm going to ask to work with a different person or a few other people who have requested to work with me. I'm just going to tell my preceptor that I'm interested in learning the different styles of the other nurses. Do you all think that this will "go over" okay or do you think that she'll take it too personally? Should I even care?

    Thanks again!

    ~Stella
    Well there you go.
  4. 0
    Quote from StellaMarisRN
    Wow, thanks everyone for the great replies! You all have some amazing stories and advice and they're really helpful!

    I guess that I should have mentioned before-my preceptor was always like this from the start. Unfortunately, she did not teach me a lot of the basics so I'm working on those along with the new things. She actually leaves the floor a lot to go to the cafeteria or call her boyfriend and sometimes she won't tell me where she's going.

    In the past, whenever the nurse educator entered the unit, she and my preceptor would go into a corner to "chat" about my progress, none of which I was invited to be a part of, but I'd hear them laughing and mentioning that I was a "slow learner." When I'd ask to be a part of the conversation, my nurse educator would make a snarky comment and my preceptor would roll her eyes. I'd have to pretend that I didn't care but it didn't make for the best learning environment. They acted like two high schoolers with their actions. Unfortunately, now that I've stood my ground and requested for a progress meeting between the three of us, my educator is nowhere to be found.

    The good news is that with each and every day that goes by, I'm not having to ask my preceptor or anyone else to help me as much. I actually had an emergency situation yesterday with a vent patient being weaned off of Diprivan who got upset, pulled on her NG tube, and ended up dislodging it a little and choking on her tube feeding. I was able to handle it on my own...thank God...because there was an emergency next door which all of the other nurses were taking care of and my preceptor was out to lunch.

    I have decided this evening that instead of giving up or feeling lost, I'm going to ask to work with a different person or a few other people who have requested to work with me. I'm just going to tell my preceptor that I'm interested in learning the different styles of the other nurses. Do you all think that this will "go over" okay or do you think that she'll take it too personally? Should I even care?

    Thanks again!

    ~Stella

    Nope not in the least. People that treat other like you describe should not be aloud to precept at all. It doesn't sound like the nurse educator is worth a darn either. They are probably jealous or something like that, intimidated. The heck with them.
  5. 0
    how did that go for you? I am a new grad in the ICU that's experiencing a similar situation and feel like it's holding me back and possibly jeopardizing my job. I feel like I'm alone and I am working so hard not to fail and sink in this unit. it has been my dream to work in this unit and I really don't want this to prevent me from growing as an icu nurse. any advice?


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