Looks a hinderance to being hired? - page 2

Hi all, I had a thought a few days ago as I get closer to completing nursing school, and have an interest in correctional nursing. The need for correctional nurses is evident, but here's my question.... Read More

  1. by   TrudyRN
    Looks are always a factor in life, I think. Will good or bad looks keep you from getting hired? No, I don't think so, if you impress them as being a capable nurse.
  2. by   bighousenurse
    being "nice looking" should not hinder you from getting the job you desire--in whatever field of nursing you aspire to work in. when you interview, always look your interviewers directly in the eye, it's something you'll have to be able to do when you deal with inmates anyway. if you are a timid-type of person, then corrections is really not the place for you. it's not a place to work for everyone, there is a reason they have a shortage, and this is one of them. you have to be assertive in dealing with both inmates and staff (other nurses & the officers). there is a wide variety of personalities in corrections, and being flexible is a plus because situations change daily if not hourly. how you carry yourself is what people respect. i go to work everyday with makeup on and dressing nice, i have no problem with inmates making inappropriate remarks to me.
  3. by   newtress
    Thank you Miss BigHouse for the tips about this unique type of nursing. It's nice to know that most all nurses here think along the same lines. Professionalism and very good nursing skills is far more important than a nurses appearance. This is good for me to know that the consensus is the same. I am planning on leaving the south and going back to Cali. The state is in great need of nurses for the Cal correctional facilities. And after just finishing my geriatric clinicals this week at a LTC facility, I would NOT want to do that type of nursing at all. There are pros and cons in any field or department of nursing. Oddly I find corrections isn't really addressed very much in nusing school or the community but wouldn't it be somewhat connected to a type of community nursing, or just considered strictly state/gov nursing?
  4. by   bighousenurse
    miss newtress, dept. of corrections/correctional nursing is it's own entity. everything you learn to be a nurse is used in the doc, along with security issues. psych is a big skill and even if you never worked psych, you will learn it quickly from occurances and other staff nurses there. i love my job, oddly, because it is a controlled environment. i know each and every day what kind of people i will be dealing with. i don't have to please and answer to family members, just take care of business and go on with my day. i feel this is an area of nursing that is kinda a well-kept secret, lol! most of the inmates appreciate what we, the nurses, do for them. yes, there is always an occasional a** to deal with, but where don't you have that and make that kind of money? when i went through nursing school they never even touched the subject of correctional nursing. what a shame.
  5. by   newtress
    BigHouseNurse, I just had to respond to your reply this evening. You make absolute sense to me. I have family members who are a psych nurse, a psychotherapist, and social workers. I have always gravitated toward what others are not interested in. My school buddies wouldn't fathom considering working in a correctional environment. But ironically as you said, I like and prefer a controlled environment and not the chaos of personality drama that I have experienced so far. It is there of course in all types of employment, but as you said, I've dealt with numerous a**** to deal with but would have like to at least be compensated for "the dealing." There was a job posting in my city here recently for RN/LPN's at the correctional facility and I went ahead and called them. She was so pleasant to speak to and said exactly what you have said " it's one of the best kept secrets of nursing" and you have backed that. On a daily basis, I don't do as well around chaos that others create for themselves and me. Just makes your job so much harder and I think more mistakes happen. So I will forge on in my pursuit and desire for the psych or correctional area of nursing. If I want it and it's there for me I will feel I've made a good choice because it "fits" me. So I'm happy to hear these encouraging words from you. There are a heck of a lot of unhappy nurses out there in so many fields of nursing. I may be odd, but I think I'd be a lot happier.
  6. by   bighousenurse
    miss newtress, when you said about the nice person you talked to on the phone about corrections, it sparked something else i must share with you. i have never had better supervisors that i have at this point of my nursing career! talk about super people! if you are flexible and willing to please, they will work with you when you're in a time of need. i sign up for ot, will stay into the next shift to cover when a coworker is running late, or switch a day or shift when someone needs off. they remember who is a team player, and they will take care of you, believe me. i have many times worked doubles and taken the next day off and not been charged personal time for it. like i said, the perks and positives are there, you just have to be willing to put the time in to learn the rules and regs of institutional employment. the first year is the hardest, you get so much crammed into your brain about security, but if you're determined and have a little tenacity you can make it work. good luck finding a good institution. there are a lot out there, along with the bad. do your homework and make good choices. let me know how it works for you!
  7. by   Mudwoman
    Quote from bighousenurse
    miss newtress, when you said about the nice person you talked to on the phone about corrections, it sparked something else i must share with you. i have never had better supervisors that i have at this point of my nursing career! talk about super people! if you are flexible and willing to please, they will work with you when you're in a time of need. i sign up for ot, will stay into the next shift to cover when a coworker is running late, or switch a day or shift when someone needs off. they remember who is a team player, and they will take care of you, believe me. i have many times worked doubles and taken the next day off and not been charged personal time for it. like i said, the perks and positives are there, you just have to be willing to put the time in to learn the rules and regs of institutional employment. the first year is the hardest, you get so much crammed into your brain about security, but if you're determined and have a little tenacity you can make it work. good luck finding a good institution. there are a lot out there, along with the bad. do your homework and make good choices. let me know how it works for you!


    you must not work for cms. the absolute worse boss i have ever had.
  8. by   kito4149
    I work for CMS in Arkansas. My supervisor IS the absolute best. The turnover is so bad here that she WORKS with your schedule so that you won't quit b/c of too many/not enough hours. Working in correctional nursing is the easiest job. The pay is great, the benefits are wonderful, and you know what you are dealing with day to day.
  9. by   Sheri257
    Quote from VegRN
    Dozens? Excuse my naivety but, it's that common for nurses who chose to work in corrections to fall for the flattery of inmates?

    Scary
    I've only occassionally heard of nurses falling for inmates but there is a HUGE problem at my facility with female CO's falling for inmates ... especially the young ones. I'm not sure why but ... they have had to fire dozens of female CO's for this reason.

    Maybe it's because on the outside, you may not be the best looking woman in the world but, in prison, you're the most gorgeous woman on the planet. Of course, at my age ... I know better.

    As far as getting hired ... I don't think looks matter as much as experience. The state facilities I've interviewed with are looking for prior corrections and/or criminal psych experience more than anything else ... because a lot of nurses who are new to corrections end up not liking it and they want to make sure you can handle it.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Apr 27, '07
  10. by   Sheri257
    Quote from newtress
    I am planning on leaving the south and going back to Cali. The state is in great need of nurses for the Cal correctional facilities.
    Actually, you may be in for a shock because I was surprized to learn there's now a waiting list for California state corrections RN jobs. Ever since the big pay raises came down, 3,000 RN's are now on the waiting list statewide. The five state prisons in my area each had a waiting list of 200-300 RN's.

    Maybe it's different in other areas of the state, especially rural areas that are difficult to staff, but in my area it's very tough to get hired on. The only reason I got hired was because I went to work for a private contracted prison and got some corrections experience. It's very, very competitive, at least in my area.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Apr 28, '07
  11. by   military spouse
    Quote from Sheri257
    I've only occassionally heard of nurses falling for inmates but there is a HUGE problem at my facility with female CO's falling for inmates ... especially the young ones. I'm not sure why but ... they have had to fire dozens of female CO's for this reason.

    Maybe it's because on the outside, you may not be the best looking woman in the world but, in prison, you're the most gorgeous woman on the planet. Of course, at my age ... I know better.

    As far as getting hired ... I don't think looks matter as much as experience. The state facilities I've interviewed with are looking for prior corrections and/or criminal psych experience more than anything else ... because a lot of nurses who are new to corrections end up not liking it and they want to make sure you can handle it.

    :typing
    About a year ago, we had several nurses become involved with inmates. One even had a baby!! I havent' heard of us having this problem lately, but.................
  12. by   Sheri257
    Quote from military spouse
    About a year ago, we had several nurses become involved with inmates. One even had a baby!! I havent' heard of us having this problem lately, but.................
    I'll admit that I've had a crush or two on some of the CO's. Especially during my first week on the job when I was feeling kinda vulnerable. It probably had more to do with the stress of the situation but, during my first lockdown there was something very attractive about big men in uniform with weapons. Of course, I kept my feelings to myself and behaved professionally at all times.

    But inmates? Ugh. I just can't see the attraction. I'm sorry but, for lack of a better term ... those guys are so gross. I would NEVER risk my license for inmates.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Apr 28, '07
  13. by   military spouse
    Quote from Sheri257
    I'll admit that I've had a crush or two on some of the CO's. Especially during my first week on the job when I was feeling kinda vulnerable. It probably had more to do with the stress of the situation but, during my first lockdown there was something very attractive about big men in uniform with weapons. Of course, I kept my feelings to myself and behaved professionally at all times.

    But inmates? Ugh. I just can't see the attraction. I'm sorry but, for lack of a better term ... those guys are so gross. I would NEVER risk my license for inmates.

    :typing
    I know!! With all of the MRSA, HIV, Hep C, and STDs we see in the prison, I can never imagine being attracted to an inmate. Many of ours seem to swing the other way when they don't have access to women. That really surprised me!

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