Federal Bureau of Prisons

  1. Hello,
    I was wondering in anyone works for the BOP? I've been perusing the website and went to usajobs.gov and see that there are numerous job openings, some of which are in TX where we would like to relocate. Unfortunately, the job website is vague in regards to dispensary or infirmary openings and shifts. Does anyone know what a typical Federal RN job is like? How long did it take to get called after completing the application? Are you assigned a shift or do you rotate? Is it ture that a new employee has to run a quarter-mile and use handcuffs in 2.5 minutes? I'm trying to remember the track during high school and it seems like such a lofty goal Would love to get some information!!!!!!! Thanks everyone!
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   BSNinTX
    I work at a facility in Texas. The vast majority of institutions are clinic jobs. The medical centers and a few care level 3 institutions have more invovled operations such as a short stay infirmary or a skilled care unit. They also often do dialysis, chemo, that sort of thing. Other than these, the majority of positions are clinic jobs doing intake assessments, triage, treatments, medications, urgent care and emergency care for injuries and occassionally serious illness (heart attack, etc.). As to shifts, most institutions now have 16 hours of coverage daily with a call schedule at night; you will probably not be guaranteed any specific shift but rather rotate according to union rules. You will need to examine the exact duties and shifts with them when you interview.

    The physical test is a 1/4 mile run and cuff in 2.5 minutes, a dummy drag of 800 feet in 3(?) minutes, an obstacle course, and a stairclimb with a weight belt. They are all doable for someone in reasonable shape. While they seem daunting, remember that you are running all out for just 1/4 mile, not a long distance. In addition, there is generally plenty of time between events to recover. In my group, there were about 15 people taking the test so you had 14 people between you and the next event. I was a little worried about it also, but I finished the run and cuff (what I feared would be my worst event) in under 90 seconds. In addition, the events are scored and a weighted score is assigned to the test overall. So, if you do really well on one event and somewhat poorly on another, you may still pass with your overall score. In addition, if you fail you are given a second opportunity the next day. But, go prepared to pass. Train ahead of time!


    Quote from military spouse
    Hello,
    I was wondering in anyone works for the BOP? I've been perusing the website and went to usajobs.gov and see that there are numerous job openings, some of which are in TX where we would like to relocate. Unfortunately, the job website is vague in regards to dispensary or infirmary openings and shifts. Does anyone know what a typical Federal RN job is like? How long did it take to get called after completing the application? Are you assigned a shift or do you rotate? Is it ture that a new employee has to run a quarter-mile and use handcuffs in 2.5 minutes? I'm trying to remember the track during high school and it seems like such a lofty goal Would love to get some information!!!!!!! Thanks everyone!
  4. by   TxNurse2Be
    Hi, I read your post about you working in Texas. Can I ask you where abouts, or how hard it is to get a job with a FCI? I graduate from an ADN program in May and I'm interested in working Corrections around the Dallas area. Any info. would be great! Thanks for your time!
    Heather
  5. by   military spouse
    Quote from BSNinTX
    I work at a facility in Texas. The vast majority of institutions are clinic jobs. The medical centers and a few care level 3 institutions have more invovled operations such as a short stay infirmary or a skilled care unit. They also often do dialysis, chemo, that sort of thing. Other than these, the majority of positions are clinic jobs doing intake assessments, triage, treatments, medications, urgent care and emergency care for injuries and occassionally serious illness (heart attack, etc.). As to shifts, most institutions now have 16 hours of coverage daily with a call schedule at night; you will probably not be guaranteed any specific shift but rather rotate according to union rules. You will need to examine the exact duties and shifts with them when you interview.

    The physical test is a 1/4 mile run and cuff in 2.5 minutes, a dummy drag of 800 feet in 3(?) minutes, an obstacle course, and a stairclimb with a weight belt. They are all doable for someone in reasonable shape. While they seem daunting, remember that you are running all out for just 1/4 mile, not a long distance. In addition, there is generally plenty of time between events to recover. In my group, there were about 15 people taking the test so you had 14 people between you and the next event. I was a little worried about it also, but I finished the run and cuff (what I feared would be my worst event) in under 90 seconds. In addition, the events are scored and a weighted score is assigned to the test overall. So, if you do really well on one event and somewhat poorly on another, you may still pass with your overall score. In addition, if you fail you are given a second opportunity the next day. But, go prepared to pass. Train ahead of time!
    Thanks so much for the info! I THINK I applied today, but the app never asked about current or prior employment and education. It did say "Thank you for applying." It really was less of an application than a vague questionare. Do you know anything about the facility in Houston? I currently work corrections, but for a company that contracts with correctional facilities. I generally work the infirmary (prefer to be there), but occasionally work the dispensary. It is a nice change from the hospital.:spin:
    Thanks again for the info! I will have to see if they call and if I can run a 1/4 mile that fast
  6. by   BSNinTX
    I am at the FCI in Bastrop.

    You should have no problem finding work at a correctional facility. There are two federal facilities in the DFW area and they are always hurting for nurses. In addition, there are some state joints as well as the myriad county jails.

    With that said, I would not recommend corrections for a new nurse. You really do need a broad base of experience, and especially critical is excellent assessment skills. A year of med-surg, emergency, urgent care, occupational health, or clinic nursing with a significant triage function is a good foundation.

    Quote from TxNurse2Be
    Hi, I read your post about you working in Texas. Can I ask you where abouts, or how hard it is to get a job with a FCI? I graduate from an ADN program in May and I'm interested in working Corrections around the Dallas area. Any info. would be great! Thanks for your time!
    Heather
  7. by   BSNinTX
    I assume that you are talking about the application process on BOP-HIRES, where you answer some multiple choice questions about your knowledge, skills, and abilities as well as select your location preferences. If so, you should be good to go. From this, they will determine if you are qualified, and if there is any competition for the job they will rank scores on the questions to determine who is first, second, etc. on the list. A formal application will be required later if the institution decides to interview you.

    Houston is a Fedarel Detention Center. That means they have a lot of pre-trial inmates, those awaiting moves to their permanent locations, and a small work cadre that is permanently assigned. As far as I know, they have no infirmary area, only the clinic space.

    It is a high-rise location, so there is little movement of inmates in the institution and a lot of stuff to take to the inmates, i.e., pill lines in the housing units and such. Expect to do a lot of intake screenings and new committment physicals.

    Except for the work cadre, there is little long-term care done for the inmates. The majority will be there a short time and anything elective is deferred until they are at their designated institutions.

    From what I understand, Houston is a well staffed institution from a health services perspective. Two physicians, two pharmacists, several mid-levels nurses. One of the physicians is someone I have worked with as he was at Bastrop for several years before going to Houston.

    If you have corrections experience, the FBOP is nothing tough for you. Expect the inmates to be more pampered than you are used to in county and state facilities and as such more demanding and familiar than you might expect.

    Also, it will likely be a big change in terms of your role. Make no mistake, at the FBOP you are a correctional officer first and foremost. Expect to be pulled to cover custody posts, at least during annual refresher training. Expect to be pulled to be part of mass shakedowns in the housing units. You will be required to train on firearms and self-defense at Staff Training Academy - it is about 1/3 to 1/2 the curriculum. You will be required to maintain proficiency on firearms and demonstrate that annually.

    Quote from military spouse
    Thanks so much for the info! I THINK I applied today, but the app never asked about current or prior employment and education. It did say "Thank you for applying." It really was less of an application than a vague questionare. Do you know anything about the facility in Houston? I currently work corrections, but for a company that contracts with correctional facilities. I generally work the infirmary (prefer to be there), but occasionally work the dispensary. It is a nice change from the hospital.:spin:
    Thanks again for the info! I will have to see if they call and if I can run a 1/4 mile that fast
  8. by   military spouse
    Quote from BSNinTX
    I assume that you are talking about the application process on BOP-HIRES, where you answer some multiple choice questions about your knowledge, skills, and abilities as well as select your location preferences. If so, you should be good to go. From this, they will determine if you are qualified, and if there is any competition for the job they will rank scores on the questions to determine who is first, second, etc. on the list. A formal application will be required later if the institution decides to interview you.

    Houston is a Fedarel Detention Center. That means they have a lot of pre-trial inmates, those awaiting moves to their permanent locations, and a small work cadre that is permanently assigned. As far as I know, they have no infirmary area, only the clinic space.

    It is a high-rise location, so there is little movement of inmates in the institution and a lot of stuff to take to the inmates, i.e., pill lines in the housing units and such. Expect to do a lot of intake screenings and new committment physicals.

    Except for the work cadre, there is little long-term care done for the inmates. The majority will be there a short time and anything elective is deferred until they are at their designated institutions.

    From what I understand, Houston is a well staffed institution from a health services perspective. Two physicians, two pharmacists, several mid-levels nurses. One of the physicians is someone I have worked with as he was at Bastrop for several years before going to Houston.

    If you have corrections experience, the FBOP is nothing tough for you. Expect the inmates to be more pampered than you are used to in county and state facilities and as such more demanding and familiar than you might expect.

    Also, it will likely be a big change in terms of your role. Make no mistake, at the FBOP you are a correctional officer first and foremost. Expect to be pulled to cover custody posts, at least during annual refresher training. Expect to be pulled to be part of mass shakedowns in the housing units. You will be required to train on firearms and self-defense at Staff Training Academy - it is about 1/3 to 1/2 the curriculum. You will be required to maintain proficiency on firearms and demonstrate that annually.
    Thank you so much for all the info!!!!!!! I really appreciate it. After a day like today, corrections seems like the most horrible job in the world Most of the time I really enjoy it, but.........
    It will be interesting to see if I get called. Somewhere in Tx would be our first choice, but I will have to look at the list again. Thanks again!!!
  9. by   nomadicV
    I worked at FMC (Federal Medical Center) at Carswell TX in Ft Worth--oversimplified, its a prison hospital for women surrounded by all levels of security. There was also a male facility nearby. I thought Carswell was very well run and didn't leave because I didn't like it or feel valued as an employee

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