Is there a CO school WITHOUT a wait list?

  1. HI Everybody,
    I was wondering if anyone has any information on any schools in Colorado that don't have a wait list of YEARS for admission. Does anyone know, is the state going to do anything soon to relieve this bottle neck? And who is "the state" department that determines this? I am so ready to start clinicals -- all pre-reqs are done and grades are great, but I'll be on social security before there is a spot for me in school!
    Anybody know of any new programs about to start up? Thanks!
    Jane
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  2. 18 Comments

  3. by   micco
    Have you looked in CSU-Pueblo? I haven't heard of a waiting list there.
  4. by   Rita Marie
    Quote from jgs284
    HI Everybody,
    I was wondering if anyone has any information on any schools in Colorado that don't have a wait list of YEARS for admission. Does anyone know, is the state going to do anything soon to relieve this bottle neck? And who is "the state" department that determines this? I am so ready to start clinicals -- all pre-reqs are done and grades are great, but I'll be on social security before there is a spot for me in school!
    Anybody know of any new programs about to start up? Thanks!
    Jane
    Hi Jane,

    Congradulations :hatparty:

    Although technically the waiting list idea is not used at our school, a person does have deadlines to meet when submitting for the school of nursing.
    Also in our area is an ADN program going to start here in Grand Junction (Delta already has one at their tech school--which is through Trinidad Community College).

    Look into the nursing program at www.mesastate.edu
    This is a four year degree that is well respected in this community as well as others, such as Denver and beyond.
  5. by   lilshamrock
    There are some schools here in CO where they don't have waitlists, but they have up to 600 applicants each year to apply for 100 positions. (CUHSC) If your not one of the lucky 100....you have to keep reapplying until you get in. So its either wait on a list or reapply each year. I've heard that private schools such as Regis university has a low waitlist because no one wants to pay 20k a year to go through nursing school. If you got the dough to spend, then private schools might be the way to go if you want a faster route.

    Good Luck!
  6. by   micco
    This was the first year Pueblo Community College (Fremont Campus) turned away applicants. Last year, there was barely enough students to make a full RN class. I would try community colleges with the exception of Pikes Peak in Colorado Springs, which does have a waiting list (or did last year when I checked). Pueblo campus has 2 RN programs (regular and extended - nights and weekends). Fremont campus has a program for LPN to RN that is 2 summer semesters and a regular RN program.
  7. by   RNNoMore
    I applied to Pikes Peak Community College in Colorado Springs in December and must have been last on the waiting list (because I was misinformed of the registration date and got there a day late LOL!), but amazingly enough I got accepted for this Fall. Don't be too put off by waiting lists - CS is a big military town and there are a lot of people who have to drop out.
    Paint.
  8. by   BSNstudent2013_KCMO
    I can tell you that the bottleneck in CO is a lack of clinical rotation spots. The Colorado BSN programs are currently taking only 1 in 10 applicants. A friend of mine who had a 4.0 got waitlisted at Regis and didn't get a slot there. My friend is starting at CU in January. I got tired of waiting, and spending money on apps, so I had to widen my school search to out of state programs. Thankfully I got accepted at St. Luke's College of Health Sciences in Kansas City, and I'm starting in January 2012.

    If possible, I'd strongly suggest considering some out of state programs if you really want to become a nurse in this lifetime. Good luck to you...
  9. by   BSNstudent2013_KCMO
    Regis is harder to get into than CU!!! And tuition there is closer to $35,000/yr. They take about 1 in 10 applicants. It is the best BSN program in the Denver area, though.
  10. by   klone
    Quote from BSNstudent2013_KCMO
    Regis is harder to get into than CU!!! And tuition there is closer to $35,000/yr. They take about 1 in 10 applicants. It is the best BSN program in the Denver area, though.
    How do you define "best"? CU has a darn fine program, and you won't go into debt for 20 years to pay for it. I think it's foolish for anyone to go into debt to the tune of over $100K for an RN program.
  11. by   BSNstudent2013_KCMO
    I define best as the one program in the Denver metro area whose graduates are in the highest demand and whose reputation among nursing employers and graduate nursing schools is strongest. (These schools are RANKED, you know! Ask around, the Denver area hospitals LOVE the Regis nursing students.) And BTW, the nursing program at Regis is (for transfers) 2 years traditional, one year accelerated, so we're talking $35-70,000 before financial aid, scholarships, etc. Most of their students receive GENEROUS financial aid and scholarship packages. Of course it makes more sense for most people to go to a good school like CU where it's more affordable, *assuming you get in* and don't want to wait 2-4 years for your shot... But waiting around costs money, too, in the form of lost earning potential. For some people, Regis is worth some additional up-front expense depending on what they plan to do down the road. If you are considering a graduate nursing degree at some point, the reputation of the school is more important than if you just want to be an RN.

    Personally, I opted not to waste any more of my time trying to get into CO BSN programs that are only taking 1 in 10 applicants. I'm going to a private school out of state, and ironically my tuition here (factoring in financial aid package) is very close to what I'd have paid at CU as a resident. And I'm not wasting time--I'm doing what I want to be doing NOW.
  12. by   klone
    It's been my experience that hospitals don't care where you went to school, as long as the program was accredited, you have your RN, are adaptable, are likeable, and hopefully come to the table with some experience.
  13. by   BSNstudent2013_KCMO
    My comments re:hospitals liking some RN programs' students better than others comes from MANY conversations with Directors of Nursing and other hiring officials at Denver area hospitals, as well as the instructors of my CNA program and nursing pre-requisite courses.

    BTW, I'm not responding to any more of your comments because it is starting to feel like you can't ever acknowledge someone else being right and your tone is increasingly hostile. Please read the policy re: personal attacks and STOP directing your comments to ME. If you have something to say to the person who opened the thread, fine, post your comments and it is your right to disagree with others. I don't have the time or interest in being targeted by you and if it continues, I'm reporting you to allnurses.com.
  14. by   klone
    I haven't violated any AN guidelines (well, not in THIS thread anyway). I'm sorry you're not liking disagreement, but I'm not being abusive or flaming by stating that hospitals generally do not care where you get your RN, and that other traits are much more important to hiring managers. If you want to report me for stating that, report away!

    I see you're new here. Perhaps you should hang out in the general nursing forum a bit to get a feel for the culture here. I, on the other hand, have been posting here for eight years, and know that what I posted is not tattle-worthy. That's what we do here. We debate, discourse, and discuss. I'm debating with you that one CO school is more favorable than another to employers, because I don't agree with you. Debate is okay! Unilateral agreement would be boring. Peace.
    Last edit by klone on Dec 1, '11

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