what do CNA's do in a hospital? - page 3

Hello everyone.... I was thinking about trying for a job at a hospital(I'm in fl.)and was wondering what do CNA's really do?Does it depened on the floor?The hospital that is hiring has MED/SURG and... Read More

  1. by   Windycitigirl
    Quote from Ready2BRN
    Hey Cantwait.....try the Red Cross. I don't know where you're located, but the Red Cross here in Tampa Bay area offers classes at night starting at 6pm. Call your local chapter..I just completed the day class and the nursing homes and hospitals are pining for CNAs trained at the Red Cross. Good luck!!
    Hi there...I am new to the forum and just wanted to add that I'm starting my CNA training tomorrow night with the Tampa Bay Chapter of the Red Cross. The process was simple and everyone in the Tampa branch was so very helpful and nice. To get started I had to pay for the course ($495 total, includes $100 deposit), get a Tuberculosis Test (done at the Take Care Clinic at Walgreens, $25), get a uniform (white pants, red top, white shoes)...there will be other fees later down the road (taking the test, background check, etc.) but all-in-all very reasonable I think.

    I am so looking forward to tomorrow night!
  2. by   trauma_queen2010
    I all depend on where you work and your management. I work in the ER at a hospital in KY and and do all the gerneral stuff, toileting, cleaning, EKGs and what not. I also have been trained and signed off to read heart monitor and EKGs, do phlabotamy, insert folys, pull iids. I have been trained to do these advanced skills. This is legal and i am insured to do them. I also have to do yearly compatencies to maintain my ability to do these things. If it were not for the paperwork I wold not be allowed to do such things and would not be covered if say someone got a util due to the cath. Anyone doing them needs to insure that they are covered to do so or if a malpracticve suit occurs you will be out on a line by yourself.
  3. by   HoneyDinkley
    Quote from AshleyF
    I'm a CNA student right now, correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought that we (CNA's) were NOT allowed to insert/remove foleys???
    That was the same thing I was taught during my CNA training.
  4. by   Safetymouse
    I was taught in my NAI course that CNA's could only clean foleys. However hospitals are allowed to give NA's advanced training and competency test them to do other tasks (an example our instructor used is administer enemas). They cannot do it outside the hospital, only inside and only if they are deemed competent.
  5. by   eveningsky339
    Allow me to contrast a nursing home with a Med/Surg floor, as I have worked on both. I will be going by day shift.

    Nursing Home

    - Get residents washed up, changed, in their wheelchairs
    - Breakfast
    - Get residents back to bed, changed
    - Blink
    - Get residents up, changed
    - Lunch
    - Get residents down, changed
    - Hopefully finish your assignment and let evening shift take over

    Med/Surg

    - Ask patients if they would like to sit in the chair for breakfast, get anything else they need
    - Breakfast
    - Daily Hygeine (can range from anywhere to total dependents to ad-libs who do it themselves)
    - 1000 vitals
    - Lunch
    - "Quiet Time" till dinner; 1400 vitals
    - Dinner
    - 1800 vitals
    - Night shift arrives

    And in between all this you will be answering call lights, getting admits and discharges, etc.

    Workload on Med/Surg tends to be lighter, but the shifts are usually 12 hours.
  6. by   HoneyDinkley
    Hi evening,

    How long have you had your license and what state do you work in? Your profile says "brand new CNA" so I was just curious.
  7. by   eveningsky339
    Have had my license for only a month, but started working in a nursing home in February. Orientation for Med/Surg is coming to a close; I've been there for about three weeks.

    I live in Maine. Our Med/Surg floor has only 32 beds, but this being the only hospital in the whole county, we often get crowded and you run into some interesting patients.
  8. by   HoneyDinkley
    Quote from eveningsky339
    have had my license for only a month, but started working in a nursing home in february. orientation for med/surg is coming to a close; i've been there for about three weeks.

    i live in maine. our med/surg floor has only 32 beds, but this being the only hospital in the whole county, we often get crowded and you run into some interesting patients.
    oh you had prior experience in a nursing home; no wonder you got a job so quickly! a lot of the new cna's here in florida are having a hard time finding jobs. everyone keeps hollering about the nursing shortage down here but none of the medical facilities seem to wanna hire a new nurse or cna.
  9. by   davidccs
    Quote from flordagirl
    oh you had prior experience in a nursing home; no wonder you got a job so quickly! a lot of the new cna's here in florida are having a hard time finding jobs. everyone keeps hollering about the nursing shortage down here but none of the medical facilities seem to wanna hire a new nurse or cna.
    i just got a job at orlando health hospital system and i have no previous experience as a cna, i am actually an emt basic. i got interviews and offers with both florida hospital and orlando health but decided to go with orlando health due to their pay rate and the floor (med/sur).

    it did take me a while of filling out applications(about 3 months doing 3-5 applications everyweek) for pct before i got a call though, so don't give up it takes time!

    i start my orientation tomorrow but from reading about other people that have worked in med/sur floors i am really excited to get working on the floor (although my emt training was very different from a cna training so there are a lot of things that i will have to learn fast)
  10. by   Jenny_07
    Really, I've been told that it depends on what floor you work on. But I've been told that its almost the same as working in LTC but you are able to do more things. As far as sope of practice being in a hospital, We were told in class that in the state I'm in if a nurse delegate's the to the aid and the aid has been taught that skill that they can do it but the RN's lic is on the line if something happens.
  11. by   at_wits_end
    I am a CNAII in NC on a med-surg unit and we ARE allowed to insert and remove Foley's and straight cath. Doing so is a part of orientation for all CNAII's in the hospital and we all had to be checke off by our preceptors to do so (which for me wasn't too hard since I've done them as a nursing student). In addition to vitals, FSBS, linens, baths, and empying drains (JP, hemovac, etc) we can also draw labs (after being checked off by an actual lab worker), suction trachs/perform trach care, change dressings after the first 24 hours, tube feedings, ostomy care, NG tubes, etc, etc, etc.

    I'm guessing what one can do depends on the state, what kind of facility you're at, and also if you're an NAI versus NAII (obviously!). I know NAI's can't do most of the things I listed above.
  12. by   Restoration
    I recently started the 11-7 shift in a hospital. I do vitals, all the ADLs as necessary, safety checks, answer call bells and float different floors. I also have no medical/health related experience prior to this.
  13. by   JessicaP4588
    that's great info =)

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