PCT and CNA whats the difference

  1. 1
    Hey guys, well I went to my local vocational school and I notice that they offer 2 programs CNA and patient care tech. The CNA program is only 4wks and much cheaper and the PCT is 6mths $1100. I started looking for jobs in that field and most employers (hospitals) ask for either PCT or CNA to do the same job. Why would you go to a PCT program over CNA they seem like its the same thing. I also notice that the PCT program description says that you train to be a CNA,HHA (Home Health Aid) certified and a little of EKG and phlebotomy but not cirtified. I was thinking of just doing the CNA 4wks and then get certified for EKG and phlebotomy which takes another 5mths...what do you think
    chris11607 likes this.
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  4. 22 Comments so far...

  5. 1
    A pct is a cna that has phelbotomy and ekg certification.
    I think that it will equal up to the same amount if you did phelbotomy and ekg seperately vs. pct.
    KdnRN2B likes this.
  6. 2
    If if you want to be a lpn or rn go for cna. If this is the end of your educational plans go PCT
    mzrogue and KdnRN2B like this.
  7. 0
    It really does not matter, I am a CNA and I worked for a hospital that trained me to do phlebotomy and EKG, now I work as a PCT at a different hospital. In my opinion its just a matter of title.
  8. 0
    It may vary by area. Where I live, there were three class offerings:

    1. Acute care
    2. Long-term care
    3. Acute and Long-term care

    Acute care trains PCTs and the class is shorter. Long-term care prepares the student for being a CNA and entitles them to take their certification exam. I personally chose option 3 - so I'm ready for both. The hospital job postings around here state either/or situations, so I figured that knowing BOTH could make me more marketable.
  9. 0
    Quote from happyloser
    It really does not matter, I am a CNA and I worked for a hospital that trained me to do phlebotomy and EKG, now I work as a PCT at a different hospital. In my opinion its just a matter of title.

    Same here, I was trained at the hospital (while employed as a CNA) and then was considered a PCT or in my state, we are also called CNA Level 2.

    I have never worked LTCF. I've worked med/surg/ICU & psych hospitals & now am in public health. Loved each area I worked in!
  10. 0
    I work in a hospital, and took a cna coarse. I'm considered a PCT until I take my state exam. I am just a cna, with out a certificate basicly
  11. 0
    Kind of confusing to me. I think the title differs where you work at...I am a patient care technician in a hospital but certified as a CNA and I have NEVER even heard of a patient technician course...I just thought that the title was different depending upon where you work at. We do things that would not be encountered in a nursing home setting such as glucose monitoring, EKG, phlebotomy, specimens etc. I would say do the CNA class and if you decide to work somewhere such as a hospital where you would be a patient care tech, they should train you on all of the other things...
  12. 0
    You should take the CNA course first. The EKG and Phlebotomy can be done at a later time. Look for other schools that offer them, it really doesnt take that long for a phlebotomy and EKG to be acquired.
  13. 0
    I'm a CNA but my job title is PCT...with no extra training except from the nurses on my unit. Does being a PCT mean that you are able to actually DO MORE than a CNA??


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