New CNA - any advice? - page 3

Ok. So I just interviewed and was hired on the spot for a PRN nurse aide position at a local nursing home. I'm only PRN because I work full-time in research but want to get my feet wet in the nursing... Read More

  1. Visit  TheOneWithGlasses profile page
    0
    I definitely agree with everyone who said to prepare beforehand. For example, before you ambulate a resident into the bathroom, open the bathroom door so you don't have to fumble with it while you're holding on to the resident. Take washcloths, depends, and whatever else you'll need into the bathroom before you take the resident in there. Little things like that add up to a lot of time and stress saved.

    Make it a habit to glance into every room, every time you walk down the hall. You might discover an accident about to happen (like a non-ambulatory resident trying to stand up from their wheelchair) and be able to prevent it.

    Never hesitate to ask another nurse aide to help you with a heavy or combative resident. Sadly, a lot of times a facility has this culture of "Only wimps can't do it alone", and that's the kind of attitude that leads to back injuries or worse...trust me on this one. I'm keeping the makers of Advil in business because I thought I had to prove what a good aide I was by doing things alone I should've gotten help with.

    Finally, when you think they can't possibly be wet because you just changed them...they'll be soaked.
  2. Visit  BabyNurseLPN profile page
    0
    I learned a great deal as an aide. This helped me get through nursing school and function a bit better as a nurse.

    Try to work around the strong nurses. Go in and watch when they do things. It will help you when you're in nursing school.
  3. Visit  Kim O'Therapy profile page
    0
    I certainly agree with the other posters. Here is my take on it.

    The top ten things a new CNA should know:

    1. Treat every pt exactly how you would want to be treated. No matter how feisty they may be, treat 'em like family.

    2. Organize and prioritize. Constantly. You will have to be willing to fit in new admits, etc., so you'll continually have do prioritize based on acuity.

    3. If you don't know something...find out. If you have trouble finding a pulse, BP, etc. ask a nurse. Don't guess, give incorrect information, or tell a patient "I don't know" and leave.

    4. Never hesitate to use your gut. If you get anything abnormal, or a pt just doesn't "look right", tell a nurse. I can't tell you HOW MANY TIMES I went to a nurse with an observation that circumvented a major incident.

    5. If you can't get to a task right away, apologize and let the pt and/or nurse know that you're working on it and haven't forgotten about it.

    6. Don't try to do anything outside your scope of practice; whether you're asked to or not.

    7. Treat every situation, good or bad, as a learning opportunity. I strongly feel as though my CNA experience will help me in nursing school.

    8. Show up on time and develope a good reputation. You never know when you'll need a letter of reference from a nurse.

    9. Think team work. If you don't help others, you will not be able to find help when you need it and, trust me, you will need it.

    10. Never say "That's not my job/patient."

    Hope this helps and good luck!
  4. Visit  jb2u profile page
    0
    Quote from Kim O'Therapy
    I certainly agree with the other posters. Here is my take on it.

    The top ten things a new CNA should know:

    1. Treat every pt exactly how you would want to be treated. No matter how feisty they may be, treat 'em like family.

    2. Organize and prioritize. Constantly. You will have to be willing to fit in new admits, etc., so you'll continually have do prioritize based on acuity.

    3. If you don't know something...find out. If you have trouble finding a pulse, BP, etc. ask a nurse. Don't guess, give incorrect information, or tell a patient "I don't know" and leave.

    4. Never hesitate to use your gut. If you get anything abnormal, or a pt just doesn't "look right", tell a nurse. I can't tell you HOW MANY TIMES I went to a nurse with an observation that circumvented a major incident.

    5. If you can't get to a task right away, apologize and let the pt and/or nurse know that you're working on it and haven't forgotten about it.

    6. Don't try to do anything outside your scope of practice; whether you're asked to or not.

    7. Treat every situation, good or bad, as a learning opportunity. I strongly feel as though my CNA experience will help me in nursing school.

    8. Show up on time and develope a good reputation. You never know when you'll need a letter of reference from a nurse.

    9. Think team work. If you don't help others, you will not be able to find help when you need it and, trust me, you will need it.

    10. Never say "That's not my job/patient."

    Hope this helps and good luck!
    :yeahthat: EXCELLENT POST!!!!!!!
  5. Visit  nrstob08 profile page
    0
    congraculations on your new job

    1. wear gloves whenever you are going to get in contact with bodily fluids

    2. be a team player, help your fellow aides if you have finished working on
    your people (they will really appreicate it)

    3. dont be afraid to ask for help if you have a problem lifting a resident,
    you dont want to mess up your back!!!

    4. dont take office politics personally and try not to become part of it.
    Just do your job and go home

    5. learn from everyone, you will see your coworkers do things differently,
    learn from them especially if it makes your job easier

    All the best on your new job, do let us know how it is going....
  6. Visit  kmarie724 profile page
    1
    I've only been working as a CNA for about a month, but here's some important things that I've learned so far:

    Always make sure to mark it in the BM chart when someone has a BM, because there's a good chance you'll be the one cleaning it up when the have loose stools from an unnecessary laxative.

    When transfering a resident, make sure you have their wheelchair in position with the wheels locked before you stand them up.

    If you don't know how to do something, ask.
    deeCNA2013 likes this.
  7. Visit  penny2009 profile page
    0
    I am starting CNA classes next week, and I am dealing with some mixed feelings. I am excited because I am a pre-nursing student and it should provide some valuable learning experiences. However, on the other hand, I could use some reassurance. All I hear about/read about is horror stories regarding how awful the work is. I know it is going to be a tough job and not everyday is going to be fabulous, but I just would like to hear some positive input. My training is being paid for by the LTC, so I am required to work at least 6 months for them and I don't want it to be absolutely miserable... Thanks.
  8. Visit  jb2u profile page
    0
    Quote from penny2009
    I am starting CNA classes next week, and I am dealing with some mixed feelings. I am excited because I am a pre-nursing student and it should provide some valuable learning experiences. However, on the other hand, I could use some reassurance. All I hear about/read about is horror stories regarding how awful the work is. I know it is going to be a tough job and not everyday is going to be fabulous, but I just would like to hear some positive input. My training is being paid for by the LTC, so I am required to work at least 6 months for them and I don't want it to be absolutely miserable... Thanks.
    First, you are correct. As a pre-nursing student, working as a cna is very beneficial. Second, keep in mind that on this board a lot of people come to vent. So, you will hear a lot of negative stuff.

    That being said, there are a lot of rewarding aspects of being a cna. You get to provide the intimate care that a lot of Nurses wished that they could provide. You get to play a BIG part in the healing of patients. In LTC, you get to develop relationships with people that have a wealth of knowledge to pass down. You will get to listen to their lives stories unfold like a best-selling novel as they share with you that which is most important to them, their life. You will laugh with some and cry with others, but the most important thing you will do is just be there for them. LTC work was grueling to me, but when I look back on it, I see the many lives that I have touched and have touched me. I still remember the day that I went into a resident's room and I knew that something was not right with him. I went to get the nurse. It turned out that his blood glucose had bottomed out! What would have been the results if I would not have picked up on his confusion and just thought he was sleepy? Yes, cna work does matter and it is rewarding. Yes, you will have days that make you want to quit, but if you concentrate on your ultimate goal, then you will be able to persevere. In the end, I don't need a pt's family member to remember me by "Jay", I just want them to remember "that one wonderful cna that took such good care of mom/dad." I want to be remembered not by name, but by the acts of my life.

    Good luck with your career and stay positive! You can also check out this thread that I posted. We are the "kickers" of healthcare

    Sincerely,
    Jay
    Last edit by jb2u on Aug 31, '06
  9. Visit  penny2009 profile page
    0
    Thanks Jay! You post was EXACTLY what I needed to hear. You put it in such wonderful, beautiful terms, and I really do appreciate it. You sound like an absolute wonderful person - our profession is lucky to have someone like you.


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