I'm a CNA, not a MAID. - page 5

I've been looking for jobs, and these places want CNA's to cook, do laundry, clean, and drive people places. Um.. maybe I got this wrong, but I dont remember learning any of these things during my... Read More

  1. Visit  mstearns09} profile page
    1
    I take it that you haven't experienced any training about culture change in LTC? Doing things like cooking meals, taking residents to doctor's appointments, doing their laundry, all of that is a part of culture change and many facilities are going to this model in order to preserve as much of a home-like atmosphere as possible for their residents (Google Eden Alternative and you'll see what I mean).
    MedChica likes this.
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  3. Visit  suanna} profile page
    0
    Many agencys in my area use what they call "Home Health Aids" or "Personal Care Assistances" essentialy untrained staff to provide for non-health related needs of the clients. These services aren't covered by most ins plans so the patient/family must foot the bill, but it frees up the CRNAs on staff to provide for the tasks they were trained for.
    If you hire at a job that requires you to provide for these needs as part of your job-you get what you ask for. I would be sure you get a clear definition of your job description before you take on these duties. What if your car fails while you are transporting a patient- are you responsible for the cost of a taxi or rental? How about a wreck- does your car ins cover a vehicle used as a comercial transport? If your patient gets ill from food you prepared (do you buy it) are you covered by your employer? There are a lot of liability questions I'd want spelled out in the job you describe.
    On the other side- I hear RNs whine all the time " I didn't go to school for 5 years to wipe butts and make beds, yadda, yadda, yadda.." Given a choice, most people wouldn't depend on others to provide for thier personal needs or errands, illness sometimes makes them depend on others, but seeing to the whole needs of the whole person is what makes Nursing a unique profession.
  4. Visit  momtojosh} profile page
    0
    i am a LPN now goin on for my RN this fall...you can bet you A&& i will be wiping AS*S......
  5. Visit  WannaBNursey} profile page
    0
    I've pretty much done Home Healthcare since becoming a CNA with a little bit of staffing on the side. I don't mind cooking and cleaning, I just mind when the client expects me to cook like a chef or clean like a professional maid. If they want maid service, then they should hire a maid, not a CNA. If they want biscuits like their mother made them, then they should call their mother up. Before I got this new position I was only getting paid $9.00/hr to get on my hands and knees and scrub floors, now I'm lucky enough to get paid $10-$12/hr.

    I truly don't mind cooking and cleaning what really gets me is doing makeup and curling hair. I couldn't curl hair if my life depended on it. I think that should be a skill taught in a CNA class since I've been expected to do it so often!
  6. Visit  Skayda} profile page
    0
    Quote from SuperMeghan91
    I've pretty much done Home Healthcare since becoming a CNA with a little bit of staffing on the side. I don't mind cooking and cleaning, I just mind when the client expects me to cook like a chef or clean like a professional maid. If they want maid service, then they should hire a maid, not a CNA. If they want biscuits like their mother made them, then they should call their mother up. Before I got this new position I was only getting paid $9.00/hr to get on my hands and knees and scrub floors, now I'm lucky enough to get paid $10-$12/hr.

    I truly don't mind cooking and cleaning what really gets me is doing makeup and curling hair. I couldn't curl hair if my life depended on it. I think that should be a skill taught in a CNA class since I've been expected to do it so often!
    Lol! I hear ya on all that! Especially the cooking like "mom made" and curling hair! One resident where I work is constantly comparing all the caregivers' cooking with the food in the restaurant where she waited tables as a young woman and making snippy remarks about "the service" if her coffee cup isn't placed exactly on her right side and isn't filled up at once, etc.
    I have to say though that I will take some new skills with me to new future jobs since coming to work in this AFH. One being learning to curl hair! You're right it should be taught in Fundamentals! Lol! The first time I tried I made a complete mess of one poor old lady's hair! Lol!
  7. Visit  Alicia114} profile page
    0
    Quote from Darkstar1485

    1) I live in florida and good paying jobs are hard to come by. Many want a CNA's to have 5+ years of exp and only pay him/her 8.00 p/h.

    2) "Sometimes you just have to buck up if you want to stay employed/employable."
    I agree to a certain extent.... but that mentalilty gives employers the green light to take advantage of future employees. at my job, we get paid 7.67 p/h. We are CNA's/Med techs/ Waitresses/Etc. Everyone complains about the low pay and lack of hours, but everyone keeps quite bc "a job is a job".

    my coworker has been working at my job for 11 years (she does the same thing that i do) and STILL makes $8.00 per hour. true story! she has asked for a raises and never gets one, yet she never leaves bc "she really needs this job." its heartbreaking.

    My question is....

    at what time do you stop bucking up and start manning up? You can't accept sub par treatment for years and years. I've seen it and it makes workers bitter and difficult to deal with.
    Wow someone needs the number to the states labor board. 11 years and no raise? unnacceptable.
  8. Visit  etxn} profile page
    0
    Sad thing is I make $20 AS a maid and only $10 as a CNA.
  9. Visit  nictheonedaynurse} profile page
    0
    I completely agree with you! People get the idea that since the CNA course is typically so sort that you can't possibly learn that many thing but it is most deffinatly a crash course of the basics of nursing. In my course I learned WAY more than I thought I would, not to mention I paid almost $1000 for the entire costs of the course and would hope to make more than $7.25, I work at Subway now and make more than that! I just passed my state exam yesterday and I think I only want to apply in facilities or hospitals. And on top of all of that, my mother works for an at home care group and she isn't certified and she makes $10 an hour and her boss told me when I became certified that she would offer me a job, but it is the same work and then some for the same pay! ARE YOU KIDDING ME?! If I take the time and money to become certified and develop my skills I hope I would get paid more than just some average joe off the street with no training. We all went through the course to learn how to safely care for people who can't care for themselves, not to drive you to the grocery store, vaccum your living room, and cook dinner for you and your family. I even know a CNA who had to provide care for an elderly person and this person lived with their son, and this guy would take his wife out when my friend would go to work and she would have to babysit their kids too! A CNA is a trained professional, not a taxi/chef/maid/babysitter.
  10. Visit  MedChica} profile page
    0
    Quote from Darkstar1485
    I've been looking for jobs, and these places want CNA's to cook, do laundry, clean, and drive people places. Um.. maybe I got this wrong, but I dont remember learning any of these things during my CNA training. I REFUSE to clean your house, cook, or be your driver. If you want a cook, get a chef. If you want you house cleaned, get a housekeeper. If you want a driver.. well, you get where I'm going.. LOL.... just had to vent about that... i just get sick of people expecting CNA's to be servants.

    What do you think?
    Well, when I did homehealth (aide), I did.
    I ran the vaccum and washed the dishes and cooked and such.

    In a way, it IS taking advantage, but I didn't completely mind. The elders needed help and I used to get bored out of my skull watching them sleep. It was fun and they were so pleasant and appreciative. The only field assignments that I do now are hospice. But if I did straight homecare while providing clinical services? I'd do the same thing as a nurse.

    I don't want to be anyone's driver, though. No. Don't like that.
    That's the only thing that ever really ****** me off? Being a chauffer.

    With one client, I was not informed that he did the whole 'errand' thing. Had I known? Wouldn't have taken the assignment.
    So, I have this big old 6'2 man in my little Eclipse. He wanted to go and what could I say? No?
    I took him to the bank to do this, that and the other.
    He became tired. So, I took him back home and he couldn't get out of the car.

    Got the wife, who was mad. She popped an attitude and I popped one right back. It surprised her and she stammered an apology.
    Guess I was supposed to sit there and take it, huh?

    She knew that he was wanting to go out. Why didn't she let me use her SUV? No - she allows me to squeeze and manuever this man into my car. Watched me struggle to get his w/c AND his walker in my little car and didn't help or say a thing.
    Yet, when we returned? She wanted to give me an attitude because I called her off her perch to help me lift her husband whose legs were too tired to transfer to the WC safely?
    Oh, no. She had 'the right one' that day!

    See - we'd already had a falling out earlier about her dogs. She told me to let him out and whatnot. Yeah: 'Told' me.
    O...k?
    So, I let the dogs out in the front. The dogs that I know of are trained to come back and these people were well-off. So, why wouldn't the animals have gone to obedience school? At that time, I didn't have a dog and didn't know better.
    Well, one came back and the other didn't. He was brought back, eventually. But...she got all flustered when I told her. That was understandable -- until...

    She became disrespectful. Something about me not having common sense.
    I said, "No, ma'am. Common sense... would entail you taking care of your own dogs and not expecting that someone who doesn't own dogs -- whose job it is to, first and foremost, provide care to your Alzheimer stricken husband has all the time in the world to be looking after a bunch of animals...."

    BRING IT!


    She was still p/o, but she shut the hell up and went outside...I know that!
    Again, I'm not going to be talked down to. I don't give a d*mn who you are. It's not going to happen. I am respectful. I am the nicest nurse ever until you cross that line. I'm not ugly to you? Don't be ugly to me.

    Her problem, in a nutshell, revolved around the fact that...she thought that I was 'The Help'. LOL

    The dogs? I take no responsibility for. I was a caregiver for her husband. Feeding and bladder training her damned animals was not in my job description. If there were stipulations? She should've voiced them. If she wanted them watched and let out, she should've brought her lazy a--s downstairs and did it herself. Common sense.
  11. Visit  Worky Quirky} profile page
    0
    Quote from nictheonedaynurse
    I completely agree with you! People get the idea that since the CNA course is typically so sort that you can't possibly learn that many thing but it is most deffinatly a crash course of the basics of nursing. In my course I learned WAY more than I thought I would, not to mention I paid almost $1000 for the entire costs of the course and would hope to make more than $7.25, I work at Subway now and make more than that! I just passed my state exam yesterday and I think I only want to apply in facilities or hospitals. And on top of all of that, my mother works for an at home care group and she isn't certified and she makes $10 an hour and her boss told me when I became certified that she would offer me a job, but it is the same work and then some for the same pay! ARE YOU KIDDING ME?! If I take the time and money to become certified and develop my skills I hope I would get paid more than just some average joe off the street with no training. We all went through the course to learn how to safely care for people who can't care for themselves, not to drive you to the grocery store, vaccum your living room, and cook dinner for you and your family. I even know a CNA who had to provide care for an elderly person and this person lived with their son, and this guy would take his wife out when my friend would go to work and she would have to babysit their kids too! A CNA is a trained professional, not a taxi/chef/maid/babysitter.
    Sorry, it is everywhere. Unfortunately. The demand is soaring for caregivers, the pay should folllow like any business. Show me the money! There are many write ups all of a sudden with a warning of some kind. How about recognize role models instead of punishing those who don't know they are doing something wrong.
  12. Visit  RunnerRN2015} profile page
    0
    Quote from jjic3982

    I love my job however I now understand the significance of being able to provide 1-on-1 care. You don't get to spend much time with one patient as you would like when you have 5 others to attend to. Some nursing homes assign 1 CNA to more than 6 patients.

    .
    A ratio of 1:6 would be heaven for CNAs! I work at a pediatric hospital and have 12 patients when we have 2 techs; otherwise, I'd have all 24. I used to work at a LTC facility and we each had 8-10 residents.
  13. Visit  AKreader} profile page
    0
    Quote from RunnerRN2b2014

    A ratio of 1:6 would be heaven for CNAs! I work at a pediatric hospital and have 12 patients when we have 2 techs; otherwise, I'd have all 24. I used to work at a LTC facility and we each had 8-10 residents.
    I have two jobs in LTC. One in the Midwest where I go to school, one in AK where I'm from (and work on breaks). Midwest job? 12 patients at least but more and more it's 18 because of working short staffed. AK job? Max number of residents is 6, and my average is 4. It's living a dream.


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