CNA frustrated with co-workers!!! - page 2

by futureADN

2,348 Views | 16 Comments

Okay I have been a CNA for a little over a year and a half at a LTC facility. I'm currently getting my pre-req's for my nursing degree. I know its a nursing home and you don't expect the best of care there but I have just had it... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from fuzzywuzzy
    I don't think the ratings make that big of a difference. I've seen surveys where they pick at every little thing that doesn't matter and others where they spend all their time in the offices, watch us do a fire drill and then leave after 2 days with "no deficiencies."

    You can't drive yourself crazy worrying about what everyone else is doing. And if someone is goofing off and leaving you alone on the hallway, do your own residents and let them worry about theirs.
    Leaving someone else's call lights going and only answering your own will result in getting written up for neglect/abuse and suspension at my facility. I will answer other people's call lights in order to cover my own backside; it really ends up hurting the other person who isn't doing his or her job. Thankfully, the nurses and administration at my facility know who does their job and who doesn't. I cannot consciously allow someone to sit and wait for help because that resident isn't my assignment. Plus, it encourages an atmosphere where teamwork is viewed as optional and not necessary which makes things not go as smoothly.
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    These replies to my comment make it sound as though I'm saying people should always go out of their way to ignore call lights and residents that are not their own. I'm not saying that. My facility likes to pull the "teamwork" card and say that "every resident is your resident" when people aren't working well together, but then when something happens or is forgotten and it's time to play the blame game, the first question asked is, "who had this resident?" You can't just say, "well I was gonna do nail care on her, but I was busy answering Megan's call lights!" because they'll turn around and say that you shirked your responsibilities to your own residents and therefore you are taking the fall. Maybe I just work in a blame-happy facility????

    I am NOT saying that "stick to your own work" is a philosophy we should all adopt as a general rule. Actually, I communicate pretty well with nearly all of my coworkers and we have no problem getting stuff done together without worrying about who is assigned to each resident. But if you're drowning because someone else isn't pulling their weight, especially if it's an ongoing thing and not just because they don't feel well that day or something, what choice do you have? You can run around all stressed out giving crappy care to everyone (while that person remains unaccountable, so things never change) or you can focus on your own work and do a good job. When you have someone that's off socializing, your unit feels like it's short-staffed even though the numbers say it isn't. So if you're providing the same lesser quality of care that you give when short-staffed, and you're not, it reflects badly on you. If you can handle the extra work, by all means help out, but don't neglect your own residents. In the OP, it sounded like this girl was working herself up into a lather trying to deal with double the responsibility. It's not right.

    Believe me, I work with someone who acts like it's every man for himself on a daily basis... she is thorough with her residents but won't do any vitals except her own, won't pass out any snacks except her own, avoids other call lights like the plague, throws coworkers under the bus constantly, leaves messes for other people to clean up but if you forgot to dump a commode she'd come find YOU to do it, etc. I want to slap her. Everyone does. I'm not saying things should be that way all the time. It makes it harder for everyone. But sometimes you have to do it that way.
    nguyency77 likes this.
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    Monday was my last day of orientation. I worked three different halls in four days, working the same hall both Sunday and Monday. On Friday, my very first day, I was on a mostly female hall, most of whom would not let a male take care of them (as far as changing clothes, changing briefs, etc). Everything was good until around 7. Now, granted most of the residents were in bed, but the two girls I was working with took their break together. We are given a 30 minute lunch break. They took an hour and fifteen minutes. By the time they got back, we were slammed with lights and I didn't get a chance to take my break until 9.

    Saturday went smoothly, as I was working a different hall (the rehab hall) with three girls. They all took their breaks seperately and made sure I got my break.

    Sunday night, everything went smoothly until 9:45. A couple of lights came on at the same time and I answered one and asked the girl on the hall with me to answer the other. When I came out, the light down the hall was on and she was still sitting at the desk. I went down the hall and all the resident wanted was some help finding her remote. When I got back to the desk (9:55), I was told, "This close to the end of shift, we don't answer call lights." I was flabbergasted. It didn't so much surprise me that she would ignore a call light, it surprised me that she would openly tell me not to answer one close to the end of shift.

    Monday was almost okay. The two girls I was on the hall with were nice, very prompt answering call lights, and very understanding of a few residents not wanting me to put them to bed. Then, at 7, they took their breaks together. Luckily, this time, I didn't have any problem being the only one on the hall.

    Yesterday (Tuesday), I went in to get a copy of my schedule printed out since my supervisor hadn't hung it on the cork board with my name on it. Apparently word had gotten to her from the adminstrator that I would be open and honest about any problems I saw. She asked me into her office and asked me to close the door. I sat down as she printed out my schedule. She got it printed and looked at me and asked, "So, have you had any problems?" Of course, this kind of scared me, so I asked what she meant. She told me that the administrator had told her I was going to be a good employee but that I would share with her if I noticed anything that was off. I told her about the being left alone on the halls, about being told not to answer call lights after a certain time, and that I almost didn't get my break my first night. She was taken aback by what I told her. She said that she would remedy the situation. Then she went on to tell me how some of the residents had come to her and told her how much they like having me there. She said that a couple of the residents were the type that never complimented anyone (but, to be fair, both of them have known me since I was a bump in my mother's scrubs).

    I think you're going to find coworkers that you disagree with no matter where you go.
  4. 0
    I been there. I know how it feels.
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    Know what ****** me off more than anything about these seemingly endless threads about bad co-workers, lights not getting answered, etc? WHERE THE HELL is the management?! WHY are they allowing people to get away with acting this way at work? I have never been in a situation where two aides from the same unit would be allowed to go to lunch at the same time. I remember talking to my charge a couple times about problems I had with co-workers, and her telling me that I needed to remind them to do such and such. I said, "We are all adults, and we all know what our jobs are. Why should I have to remind them to do their jobs? Besides I am new and the bottom of the totem pole here, so how popular will I be if I am going around telling people how to do their jobs?" Instead of stepping up and doing her management job, she wanted to pawn it all off on me. Another aide approached the clinical director of our floor about persistent problems with non-teamwork and difficulty completing her work because of it, and basically got told to just fake her charting to make it look like it got done. I don't understand how people who are so BAD at dealing with people and asserting authority get management positions in the first place.

    Are there any nurse-managers here who can enlighten me? Why are these bad apples allowed to continue doing their jobs crappily, taking advantage of your good employees, and grinding them down with frustration to the point where they leave? Then all you are left with is the bad apples and their poor care, because you ran off the good employees by refusing to discipline or get rid of the bad ones. Why would you, as a manager, choose that route? Especially in this awful economy, when there are 100 applicants for every job opening, you could replace bad employees easily. So why don't you?
    fuzzywuzzy likes this.
  6. 0
    Quote from duskyjewel
    Know what ****** me off more than anything about these seemingly endless threads about bad co-workers, lights not getting answered, etc? WHERE THE HELL is the management?! WHY are they allowing people to get away with acting this way at work? I have never been in a situation where two aides from the same unit would be allowed to go to lunch at the same time. I remember talking to my charge a couple times about problems I had with co-workers, and her telling me that I needed to remind them to do such and such. I said, "We are all adults, and we all know what our jobs are. Why should I have to remind them to do their jobs? Besides I am new and the bottom of the totem pole here, so how popular will I be if I am going around telling people how to do their jobs?" Instead of stepping up and doing her management job, she wanted to pawn it all off on me. Another aide approached the clinical director of our floor about persistent problems with non-teamwork and difficulty completing her work because of it, and basically got told to just fake her charting to make it look like it got done. I don't understand how people who are so BAD at dealing with people and asserting authority get management positions in the first place.

    Are there any nurse-managers here who can enlighten me? Why are these bad apples allowed to continue doing their jobs crappily, taking advantage of your good employees, and grinding them down with frustration to the point where they leave? Then all you are left with is the bad apples and their poor care, because you ran off the good employees by refusing to discipline or get rid of the bad ones. Why would you, as a manager, choose that route? Especially in this awful economy, when there are 100 applicants for every job opening, you could replace bad employees easily. So why don't you?
    The problem at our facility isn't necessarily management; it's the fact that they can't keep help, and good help at that, at our facility. Some of it is management, especially when the DON's niece is one of the aides and the niece is completely lazy, sloppy, and a pain in the keester. They keep her around because they are already short and the rest of us get to clean up after her. Until she does something completely egregious, she'll likely always work at our facility. I stopped counting the number of times nurses have reported her and other aides have reported her. All she gets is a slap on the wrist. I'm just waiting for her to seriously screw up so maybe something will be done.

    I should note that I live in a very, very rural area and getting enough help is a problem. My facility doesn't pay enough to encourage people to stay or apply. Most of us are driving an average of 15 miles one way to work and are probably doing our best to keep gas in our tanks, let alone pay the rest of our bills.

    However, I have to agree with what you said. Unless people start stepping up and doing what their job description says, the rest of us are going to suffer the consequences, and sadly, our residents will suffer, too.
  7. 0
    Quote from duskyjewel
    I said, "We are all adults, and we all know what our jobs are. Why should I have to remind them to do their jobs? Besides I am new and the bottom of the totem pole here, so how popular will I be if I am going around telling people how to do their jobs?" Instead of stepping up and doing her management job, she wanted to pawn it all off on me.

    Why are these bad apples allowed to continue doing their jobs crappily, taking advantage of your good employees, and grinding them down with frustration to the point where they leave?
    They keep the bad employees around because they kiss butt.

    As for the management expecting YOU to keep people in line... been there! Anytime there is a problem and I talk to the DON about it, instead of taking the steps to solve the problem she just tries to get me to tattle on other employees. One time a coworker started bossing me around telling me to help her with something when I was in the middle of taking care of someone else, so I told her no. There was another girl on the floor that day that had been up at the desk kissing the nurse's butt for the last half hour-- why wouldn't you ask her instead of someone who was busy actually working? Well she went crying to the nurse about it and I got written up for refusing to help. This p*ssed me off so I went to the DON to argue the write-up. I ended up telling her that people don't always drop everything to help me every time I ask and I put on my big girl panties instead of running to the nurse about it and trying to get people written up... and these are instances where the other aide ISN'T busy, just lazy! I was told that I need to be firm with people when they won't help me and yadda yadda yadda. Um, no. It's not MY job to manage other people, it's YOURS.... and you have proven to me already that when someone makes a legitimate complaint against someone else, you personally do nothing about it.


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