Clinical Experiences?

  1. 1
    Hey, I'm currently taking a CNA class right now and we're just about finished up with the classroom portion. We're set to take the final exam on Monday and then afterward start our clinicals.

    I've been doing really well in the classroom portion, it's pretty easy, so I'm sure I'll have no problems with the written exam. I am a little nervous about the clinicals and skill portion, though. For those of you that had clinicals, how did they go and what was your experience like? Any tips, advice, etc. you could give me? Thanks!
    Joe V likes this.
  2. 6 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    I'm sorry in advance because I don't have much advice for you since I just started the clinical portion this week... But I just wanted to say that I loved learning everything in the classroom but I absolutely hated my first day at the nursing home. I wanted to leave, I was set on quitting, and now I'm really contemplating if I should finish the program or just quit now-- I definitely don't plan to work as a Cna. I would rather spend the clinical hours studying for my bio and Chem classes.

    Please keep me updated on how you liked the clinical portion!! I look forward to it.. Good luck!!!!
  4. 0
    I graduated my CNA program this past summer, for reference. I loved clinicals, aside from a couple of issues that ended up leading to my instructor's resignation at the end of our program. But the clinicals, themselves, weren't at all bad! If you have a supportive instructor who encourages questions (since you are still learning), you will do fine! Just be sure to really watch your infection control and resident safety aspects, so that no one gets hurt, and ask questions if you are unclear about something! Good luck!
  5. 0
    I loved my CNA clinicals. I was brand new to patient care as well as to working in a hospital/medical setting. My goal was to learn as much as I could and I did this by observing and volunteering to jump right in and help the residents as much as possible. Our shifts were ~8 hours long, 6-2 ish. We woke residents, assisted feeding breakfast and lunch, bathed them, transported them to physical therapy and the recreation room and got themReady for nap/ bed. I truly enjoyed my CNA clinicals. I nearly Cried some days due to patients telling me their stories. I met flirty old men on hospice who wanted to maintain their dignity while needing to be hoyer lifted in a room full of women, I met sweet old people who rarely spoke, demented people with a spark that shone thru their stoic exterior. I cleaned lots of poop and it was a great experience for me.
  6. 0
    I loved my clinicals as well. We were in a fairly large LTC and assigned to a different CNA everyday. I was determined to learn as much as possible so volunteered to do anything and everything I could. My first 5 mins there and I was in the shower room bathing a male resident! My advice would be to jump in with both feet. Don't be shy, ask a lot of questions and do as much as you are able, and they are willing to let you! You'll be fine!
  7. 0
    I took my CNA class this past summer, topped off with two days of clinicals, 6:30 to 2:30. I dreaded my clinical time from the first day or class. The first day I showed up, I was so nervous I was sick at my stomach.

    Clinicals were great. Once I got in there and got hands on with the residents, things went very smoothly. My first day, I was on a hall with all men, since my instructor wasn't sure how the female residents would react to a straight male caring for them. The men were all great. I changed one wet brief all day, did five showers, and fed a lady both breakfast and lunch.

    My second day, I expected to be put back on the hall with the men. However, my instructor found a group of coherent women that were all fine with me working with them. I did two jacuzzi baths that day and didn't change a single brief.

    I had more fun than I thought I would. Just give it a chance. You'll either love it or hate it.
  8. 1
    Clinicals are a little exposure to the actual job of being a CNA, and working as a CNA is the entire point of taking a CNA course(unless you just want it on a resume), so its your chance to see whether its something you want to do or not. As you will discover, taking care of real patients/residents, is absolutely nothing like taking care of a mannequin or cooperative students.

    I remember after our first clinical, whenever we were practicing skills on each other like making an occupied bed and rolling each other over, we would joke that to make it realistic, rather than just roll over, we should fight it and do everything possible to resist rolling. I remember one student who used to make everyone laugh because she would be clawing and grabbing and trying to grab hair while you rolled her over, but often thats pretty much how it is lol.
    TurtleCat likes this.


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