Best place to work for a new CNA?

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    Where is the best place to work for a new CNA Hospital, Long term care facility, or home health? We had someone from an each place but a hospital come in but still unsure which would be best. All 3 are hiring in my area but I've never worked in the field before other then caring for my own physically handicapped child. Most people in my class seem to have some kind of experience or younger kids not really desperate for a job yet. What are the negatives and pros of each place?
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  4. 9 Comments so far...

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    I have done all three, Only thing is though some hospitals won't even look at you until you have some kind of experience... LTC is a great experience but depending on how well staffed you are it can be negative for some new cna's. Home health is awesome if you love the one on one with people and don't really want the hectic pace of LTC or Hospitals... I prefer hospital nursing myself cause you learn alot from that experience, though myself I am working in LTC cause they are going to pay for my LPN
    hope that helps
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    That's a great question. I wanted to know the same thing when I was a new CNA. I just got my CNA license last October and started out working at a LTCF. I know everyone says to give it time but honestly I just couldn't do it. I ran myself ragged, lost about 10 lbs in a short amount of time, never got breaks, rarely had my full dinner break and couldn't find time to fetch my water bottle for a drink as often as I needed. I worked at a facility that was very understaffed and not the friendliest work environment. I just found it wasn't for me. For those CNA's who have stuck it out....kudos to you!!! I left the LTC and went into Home Health care which was so much more suitable for me. I have had the same clients full time for over two months now and just love them and love what I do. I actually look forward to going to work every day and feel wonderful when I leave at the end of my shift. I picked my schedule (hours & days) and the Agency fit me with clients that worked with my schedule. I know home health care isn't for everyone but I can't think of anything negative about it. Good luck making your decision and finding the right fit! And congrats on becoming a new CNA!! yeah:
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    As a new CNA, your best bet is to apply EVERYWHERE. THen, if you get multiple interviews, ask about pay, staffing, etc. It can be hard to find a job these days, so you don't want to be too picky about the type of facility, you know?

    BUT, I will say, since you said you care for your handicapped child, are there any children's homes in your area? I work at a home for developmentally disabled children and young adults, and I absolutely love it.

    Anyway, some pros and cons:

    Hospitals tend to have better staffing, and you see more...but are often hard to get hired without experience and can be very hectic.

    LTC facilities have a lot of staffing issues and heavy workloads, but the good thing about them is that you care for the same residents all the time, and can build really rewarding relationships with them. THey also sometimes have a more homelike feel.

    Agency has a lot of flexibility, but if you're traveling from place to place, you can waste a lot of time and money on gas and traveling.
    talldude and Sally Lou like this.
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    Ditto what yousoldtheworld said...apply everywhere.

    I just completed my CNA class and waiting to take the state test next week. I applied to LTCs and Hospitals and it looks like I'll be picked up at a LTC. I'm hoping they will pay for my LPN. (crossing fingers).

    I'm also hoping to pick up a PRN position at a hospital in the near future because I want to get some experience in that setting.
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    Quote from AzDeb
    That's a great question. I wanted to know the same thing when I was a new CNA. I just got my CNA license last October and started out working at a LTCF. I know everyone says to give it time but honestly I just couldn't do it. I ran myself ragged, lost about 10 lbs in a short amount of time, never got breaks, rarely had my full dinner break and couldn't find time to fetch my water bottle for a drink as often as I needed. I worked at a facility that was very understaffed and not the friendliest work environment. I just found it wasn't for me. For those CNA's who have stuck it out....kudos to you!!!

    This statement is very true. I worked at the same LTCF for 10 years and this was very true for me and my coworkers unfortunately. The cna's were treated like dirt. Which is a shame because they are the hardest worked in a nursing home. The only time my coworkers and I got our 15 minute breaks was if we smoked. I honestly cant tell you how many times I was practically ******* my pants, from holding it in and not going to the bathroom when I had to, because it was that busy.

    In LTC I found dayshift works better together then second shift. Dayshift was faster paced and your day went super fast, compared to second shift.

    Home health/private duty: It was ok. Travel/wear and tear on your car is a con. Your doing private care,light housekeeping and making meals. Pay is low as well. My one friend does Hospice and she gets paid more then normal private duty.

    As for Hospital? I don't know yet? I start May 2nd lol.

    I've been an cna for 14 years. I can tell you anywhere I worked,It was never the work I disliked. I loved my work. It was the people I worked with I didn't like. The people you work with make your job what it is errr the environment you work in.
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    For a new CNA I don't think that I would reccomend home health. I work home health now but I have a year of experience (I worked at a facility for adults with DD prior to this).

    I would not recommend home health to a new CNA because you are by yourself! There's no one to help you, to guide you, to assist you while you become more comfortable. There's no one to help you get htat patient up when you can't, etc. There's no one to tell you if this situation is worthy of a call to your supervisor or if it's something you should deal with on your own.

    I would not recommend home health to someone new to the field. Home health is awesome once you have been around the block awhile and are confident in your skills. I'd say its the perfect job two years in, because then you are confident and don't have to deal with coworkers who sometimes can be the roughest part of any job. But until you are confident in what you are doing...I wouldn't recommend it.
    funtimes likes this.
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    Hello AZDeb,
    I would like to know the name of the Home Health company you work for. It sounds wonderful!
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    A hospital is the nicest work environment generally, and probably the easiest and best paying of the three, but if you have no experience as an aide you might find it stressful at first. The RNs probably arent going to have a lot of patience for an aide who struggles doing things like cleaning up an incontinent patient and making an occupied bed, so LTC might be a better place to learn, because everything is a lot harder in real life than it is in class.

    I hate to say it, but its probably better to struggle through these things in LTC than to do it on a sick or dying patient in a hospital connected to all sorts of tubing and drains, with family standing around staring at you and the patient's 02 dropping everytime you lay them flat for even a few seconds.

    Homecare I have no experience with so I couldnt say.
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    More than likely LTC. Hospitals generally don't even look at you if you have had less than 2 years of experience. Your probably wouldn't have a problem with being hired by home health but as my instructor told me it takes 6 weeks befor a new CNA feels comfortable in what they are doing and 6 months till they are compitent, I have orientated CNAs befor were I work and I have found this to be true. As a homehealth aide you are generaly alone so durring those first 6 weeks you wont have any one to lean on or to ask advice from. Plus if you can survive LTC you can survive about anything, I like to call it CNA boot camp !


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