be a cna first ? if possible yes!!!

    • Not that long ago a week or so I posed the question, Should I take the cna course while I do some of my pre-reqs for the RN program?. It was a very hard decision. On the day that the class started, I still wasnt sure, I drove to the school about 45 minutes from my home, I drove in the parking lot and just sat there, Should I just do this or just go home and plug away at my pre-reqs. needless to say at about a minute before the class was to start. I, still confused walked to the class and sat down. 2 weeks in the class, BEST decsion I could of made. :spin: If you have never worked any in the nursing field. Do this! you learn basic stuff, but you are starting your foundation for RN. I love it, I already know that I want to stay working with the elderly. Ive learned so much. by the way Iam in the monterey Ca area. anyone else from this area?
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  1. 7 Comments

  2. by   Bebi11
    Hey there

    Can you tell me what the pre-reqs are and how to get started. I don't know anything about the way college in America works and it's pretty confusing

    I know that I want to do CNA first and then go for RN too.
    Can you help me with it? I'm also worried about my English language a little, but I hope that it will be good enough.
  3. by   DreamyEyes
    Quote from Bebi11
    Hey there

    Can you tell me what the pre-reqs are and how to get started. I don't know anything about the way college in America works and it's pretty confusing
    Pre-reqs are the classes you have to take before applying to RN programs. Some LPN programs also have pre-reqs that are required, but a lot don't, which is why many people choose to go the LPN route first. Some of the pre-reqs are A&P, Chemistry, Microbiology, etc. A lot of schools require that you have most of the pre-reqs done before you even apply to their nursing program. It also makes it easier to be completed with the pre-reqs, because when you're in nursing school you can focus on your nursing courses. You can take your pre-req classes anywhere-I would check out the local community colleges around your area. Hope this helped & good luck!
  4. by   shalamar
    if your interested in becomming a cna first, check with any adult school in your area, I think it is alot cheaper that way or check vocational schools in your area, alot of times not only do they offer LVN program, but also offer CNA programs,I believe it probably cost alot more going to a vocational school. If your interested in becoming a RN go to your local college and talk to a counselor, and they will tell you what classes you need to start with. If your interested in going to work soon, I would say do the CNA course, its a short course(my course is 6 weeks) it will get you in the work force quickly, and teach you basic things. also just search the internet under cna training, or local colleges in your area.:spin:
  5. by   Mamakidee
    Thank you for posting this! I am currently taking my pre-reqs and just received my financial aid check on Saturday. I have enough money to buy books and pay for a CNA course. The course starts next Monday and I have been putting off paying for the course. I am feeling just like you felt! The class is the perfect timing for me.....It is 4 hours during the day(when my kids are at school). Maybe I am scared of the commitment. Just the thought of adding more to my load, I guess. But I know once I do the course I'll be glad.

    Tonia
  6. by   shalamar
    well I have a couple more weeks left in my cna class. It is going well! my advise to anyone starting the cna course, there are 40 skills you need to learn for the Red Cross, start learning them as soon as you can. also Red Cross has a large purple and white book published by Red Cross, called Nurse Assistant Review Manual Preparation for Testing. The book cost around 28.00 dollars, it goes step by step on the 40 procedures you have to know to pass the state test. you will only be required to do 4 skills, one being on handwashing. (the tricky part is, you don't know which skills you will be tested on)so be prepared! matter of fact, even before you start the class get the book, it list the 40 skills. hope this helps.
  7. by   metalhead
    i'm taking one of those cna courses at a nursing facility where u earn while u learn stuff and i'm learning alot...plus the school is free the only thing i had to pay for was my uniform which was 12 dollars my own stethoscope ..i will be taking my certification in december
  8. by   ♪♫ in my ♥
    Quote from shalamar
    well I have a couple more weeks left in my cna class. It is going well! my advise to anyone starting the cna course, there are 40 skills you need to learn for the Red Cross, start learning them as soon as you can. also Red Cross has a large purple and white book published by Red Cross, called Nurse Assistant Review Manual Preparation for Testing. The book cost around 28.00 dollars, it goes step by step on the 40 procedures you have to know to pass the state test. you will only be required to do 4 skills, one being on handwashing. (the tricky part is, you don't know which skills you will be tested on)so be prepared! matter of fact, even before you start the class get the book, it list the 40 skills. hope this helps.
    I just took (and passed) my test from the Red Cross last week (in Sunnyvale but the evaluators were from Santa Cruz...same folks for you, perhaps).

    Anyway, it was pretty easy. Here's my advice:
    1. Talk through everything that you're doing. It helps you keep track but it also helps them see your thought processes.
    2. If you think of something that you might have forgotten, make sure you mention it. You get credit for the action even if you don't remember until the very end.
    3. Know your six principles of care.
    4. The grading is actually pretty lenient. For each skill, they have applications of each of the six principles. To pass, you simply have to get at least one application of each principle and not do anything boneheaded.
    5. Stay calm. It's pretty much just common sense so think through what you're doing. If you draw a blank, go back to the six principles and apply them to what you're doing.

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