CNS in pain management??

  1. I am currently in a BSN program but eventually want to become a CNS. I am interested in pain management but all of the info I am getting on schools don't list pain management as a specialty area. I am wondering how would someone go about getting a specialty in this area. What is the usual course of action? Thanks alot
    •  
  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   nesher
    Seems a good connect is through CRNA programs.
  4. by   llg
    There aren't separate Master's programs for each aspect of nursing care. Therefore, many people interested in a specific aspect of care (rather than a general population) get their Master's Degrees in a more general area, then focus much of their coursework, clinical's, and special projects on their specific area of interest.

    For example, I got my Master's in Perinatal Nursing, but focused on the neonatal side of things. I have many friends who have Master's degrees in the area of adult health or general med/surg ... then focused on oncology patients, or diabetes management, or cardiac rehab, etc. etc. etc. In the children's hospital in which I work, many people have Master's Degrees in "pediatrics" and then focus on pain, or diabetes, or oncology, or ER, etc. They frequent get certified in their area of focus to help establish their expertise in their area of primary interest.

    There is no need to go the CRNA route unless you really want to be a CRNA.

    I would talk with the faculty of the schools you are interested in and ask them what programs they offer would best suit your career aspirations. Then compare their answers and choose the one that best suits your needs.

    llg
    Last edit by llg on Mar 2, '05
  5. by   athena77
    Quote from llg
    There aren't separate Master's programs for each aspect of nursing care. Therefore, many people interested in a specific aspect of care (rather than a general population) get their Master's Degrees in a more general area, then focus much of their coursework, clinical's, and special projects on their specific area of interest.

    For example, I got my Master's in Perinatal Nursing, but focused on the neonatal side of things. I have many friends who have Master's degrees in the area of adult health or general med/surg ... then focused on oncology patients, or diabetes management, or cardiac rehab, etc. etc. etc. In the children's hospital in which I work, many people have Master's Degrees in "pediatrics" and then focus on pain, or diabetes, or oncology, or ER, etc. They frequent get certified in their area of focus to help establish their expertise in their area of primary interest.

    There is no need to go the CRNA route unless you really want to be a CRNA.

    I would talk with the faculty of the schools you are interested in and ask them what programs they offer would best suit your career aspirations. Then compare their answers and choose the one that best suits your needs.

    llg
    Thanks alot for that information. That actually put it in perspective now. So you get your Master's and then certify in the specialty area if you wish? Which would be the pain management?
    Another quick question, can a CNS prescribe medicine?
  6. by   llg
    Quote from athena77
    Thanks alot for that information. That actually put it in perspective now. So you get your Master's and then certify in the specialty area if you wish? Which would be the pain management?
    Another quick question, can a CNS prescribe medicine?
    It's usually a little more complicated than just getting a "general" Master's and then getting certified, but now you're beginning to think along the right track. Graduate ... get a little work experience with the population that interests you most ... then get a Master's in a related area. Different schools offer Master's Degrees with slightly different areas of focus. Find one that matches your career interests -- but don't expect to find one that is an exact match for the specific topic of your choice. At the graduate level, the school's program gets you in the right neighborhood, then you hone in on a more specific area by choosing topics for your papers and projects that increase your expertise in your chosen topic. Work experience and certification also help develop and document your expertise.

    If you have an area of special interest (e.g. pain management), you should be reading the literature on that topic -- particularly any journals that specialize in that area. Look at the job advertisements and the "information about the authors" that is usually included with the articles. Browse your library! Also, as a practicing nurse, you should go to conferences that focus on that topic and talk with the experts that you meet at those conferences. Find out about their career paths. Ask for their recommendations.

    If you do all these things, you should be able to make a pretty good decision for yourself by the time you are ready to go to graduate school.

    llg
  7. by   athena77
    Quote from llg
    It's usually a little more complicated than just getting a "general" Master's and then getting certified, but now you're beginning to think along the right track. Graduate ... get a little work experience with the population that interests you most ... then get a Master's in a related area. Different schools offer Master's Degrees with slightly different areas of focus. Find one that matches your career interests -- but don't expect to find one that is an exact match for the specific topic of your choice. At the graduate level, the school's program gets you in the right neighborhood, then you hone in on a more specific area by choosing topics for your papers and projects that increase your expertise in your chosen topic. Work experience and certification also help develop and document your expertise.

    If you have an area of special interest (e.g. pain management), you should be reading the literature on that topic -- particularly any journals that specialize in that area. Look at the job advertisements and the "information about the authors" that is usually included with the articles. Browse your library! Also, as a practicing nurse, you should go to conferences that focus on that topic and talk with the experts that you meet at those conferences. Find out about their career paths. Ask for their recommendations.

    If you do all these things, you should be able to make a pretty good decision for yourself by the time you are ready to go to graduate school.

    llg
    Okay, now I have a much better understanding about the process... Thanks so much, you've been very informative!
  8. by   WashYaHands
    There is a program that offers an MSN with a self-defined CSN specialty. Prior to beginning the program the student and graduate faculty advisor create the specialty courses. The created courses must meet stringent requirements for curriculum development. The created speciality courses are completed in addition to the core courses. The academic work and clinical practicum that you participate in must be related to the self-defined specialty, and your thesis work or comprehensive exam is centered around that specialty as well. A friend of mine completed this program with a Cardiac CNS specialty. http://web.uccs.edu/bethel/cns.htm scroll down for a brief description of the self-defined option.

close