Can I get CNS in NICU without being at highest acuity hospital?

  1. 0
    Hello,

    I am contemplating my career at a NICU level II hospital.

    Forgive my ignorance, but can someone pursue a MSN-CNS for NICU even if they do not see the highest acuity patients on a regular basis?
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  4. 6 Comments so far...

  5. 0
    Quote from wahoowa
    Hello,

    I am contemplating my career at a NICU level II hospital.

    Forgive my ignorance, but can someone pursue a MSN-CNS for NICU even if they do not see the highest acuity patients on a regular basis?
    You can pursue the degree as long as the infants you are dealing with are classified as "high risk". The real question is whether you will be able to find a job afterward. Will there be a position for you at the Level II NICU?

    MOST places will not hire a CNS or an NNP without at least 2 years of Level III experience. Something to keep in mind.
  6. 0
    As the previous poster states, you will need Level III experience for almost every NNP/CNS position, even for working at a Level II facility. Someone has to be able to care for the sicker kids until they can get transferred out.

    Right now, I recommend starting to work in an NICU and see if the role of NNP is something that you want down the line, you may find that you do not wish to advance like that............have you actually shadowed a NNP in a Level III or IV facility? You may wish to try that also...........so that you can get a different perspective on things............
  7. 0
    Hello everyone. I am a NICU Level III nurse. I have been in the NICU setting for about 4 years now, though I was a medic in the Navy for 9 years. I am really confused about what field I want to go into.
    Is there such thing as a Health Promotion/Wellness CNS?
    What is the difference between an NNP and a CNS?. What do you need to do to get there? I know that with NNP you have to have a masters and then get your certification in Neonatal medicine. I just don't see myself working in the NICU as an NNP for the rest of my life. I love to teach and I love the high acuity in the NICU. I am just not sure what field of medicine to go into, or where to research the difference areas clinical nurse specialists can work?
    Any advice? :angel2:
  8. 0
    This is from the University of Washington's School of Nursing website. It briefly describes the functions of the NNP and the CNS. Hope it helps

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~
    Neonatal nurse practitioners provide care to low and high risk neonates, on a continuum from well infants to infants with acute and chronic health problems, and their families, in a variety of health care settings. These settings may include level II or III neonatal intensive care units (NICU), well newborn areas, intermediate care units, NICU follow-up clinics, and other community based settings. The NNP manages a caseload of infants in collaboration and consultation with other health care providers. Other aspects of the NNP role may include staff and parent education, consultation, and research.

    Graduates of the neonatal nurse practitioner program are eligible to take National Certification Corporation (NCC) Neonatal Nurse Practitioner certification examination.

    The neonatal clinical nurse specialist (CNS) provides consultation, education, research and leadership in neonatal care. The neonatal CNS serves as an expert clinical resource for nurses, other health care providers, and families. The neonatal CNS develops educational programs for professionals and parents and collaborates to develop and evaluate unit patient care standards.

    The neonatal nurse practitioner/clinical nurse specialist combines these two roles.



    http://www.son.washington.edu/eo/nnp/scope.asp
  9. 0
    Quote from RN4NICU
    This is from the University of Washington's School of Nursing website. It briefly describes the functions of the NNP and the CNS. Hope it helps

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~
    Neonatal nurse practitioners provide care to low and high risk neonates, on a continuum from well infants to infants with acute and chronic health problems, and their families, in a variety of health care settings. These settings may include level II or III neonatal intensive care units (NICU), well newborn areas, intermediate care units, NICU follow-up clinics, and other community based settings. The NNP manages a caseload of infants in collaboration and consultation with other health care providers. Other aspects of the NNP role may include staff and parent education, consultation, and research.

    Graduates of the neonatal nurse practitioner program are eligible to take National Certification Corporation (NCC) Neonatal Nurse Practitioner certification examination.

    The neonatal clinical nurse specialist (CNS) provides consultation, education, research and leadership in neonatal care. The neonatal CNS serves as an expert clinical resource for nurses, other health care providers, and families. The neonatal CNS develops educational programs for professionals and parents and collaborates to develop and evaluate unit patient care standards.

    The neonatal nurse practitioner/clinical nurse specialist combines these two roles.



    http://www.son.washington.edu/eo/nnp/scope.asp
    That information was SUPERB, thank you so very much!!!!!!
    I am in my RN to BSN program and we have a "role" essay test this next week and I am to research a particular area of nursing and run with it. Any other areas that I can get info on pay, where can nurses work other than hospitals as a Neonatal nurse practioner??
    Also, for the neonatal clinical nurse specialist, is that a combined program where I would serve as both an NNP and an Neonatal Clinical Nurse Specialist?
  10. 0
    NNPs work in hospitals only for the most part. Once the infant is discharged from there, then they become a pediatric patient. And are now longer followed by the NNPs.


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