question about insurance/etc.......

  1. Quick question...

    I know many doctors are "bonded." To become a crna, do you have to get bonded, or just insured? How does that work, whats the difference?

    thanks a lot.
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   suzanne4
    Bonded? Are you sure that you are using the right word for doctors?
    Bonded normally means that a certain amount of money is put into escrow to make sure that something is done or is provided as previously agreed to.

    That is quite different from insurance.
  4. by   Busy20yo
    maybe i was totally confused?

    Ok then.....

    To be a crna, do you just have to be insured? If so, how does that work? You just pay a certain percent of waiges, and then if someone sues, your covered?

    thanks for ANY info!
  5. by   suzanne4
    The facility where you are working actually pays your insurance, unless you are working independent. But the insurance companies require you to have four years experience before you can work independent.
  6. by   Busy20yo
    ok. So you just get the education, find a hospital that needs your skills, and they take care of the rest????
    Thanks a whole lot! I know this post sounds stupid, but your time and info are MUCH appritiated!
  7. by   elkpark
    Healthcare professionals "buy" malpractice insurance by paying premiums for it, just like health insurance, automobile insurance, or homeowner's insurance. Since hospitals also buy malpractice insurance, many of the people who work for the hospital are covered under the hospital's insurance policy, and don't need to buy their own coverage. But that varies from facility to facility, and would need to be discussed in detail when you were applying for a job.

    If (God forbid!) you get sued for malpractice, your insurance company provides legal representation and pays any award or settlement that results, the same as your automobile insurance company does if you're in at fault in an automobile accident.

    Is all of this starting to make sense?
  8. by   Busy20yo
    Yes. Very much so! Thank you soo much for your time.

    To tell you the truth, the reason i'm asking is because a couple years ago i got caught trying to get into a 21 and up club with a fake id. It was a misdemeanor offence, and i got my licence suspende for 1 year.

    One person i know said that I could not be "bonded" because of that, and that i should make sure that it isn't required for my field.

    Long story short, I just want to make sure that nothing can stop me(legally) from becoming a CRNA. I am a VERY VERY dedicated person, who will complete the schooling once i set my mind/time to it. I just want to make sure that I don't waste all that time and effort just to find out that I can't obtain my dreams.

    Thanks. IF you have any other suggestions/comments, they are GREATLY appritiated!

    PS- A MINOR misdemeanor shouldn't hurt my chances of getting the job, right?
    thanks!
  9. by   elkpark
    Whether or not a criminal record will keep you from getting licensed is up to the BON in the state in which you will originally get licensed -- you should check with them and discuss your record openly and honestly with them before you put any $$$ or effort into nursing school.

    I don't think a misdemeanor will prevent your getting licensed, but the final say is up to the BON.
  10. by   Busy20yo
    How would I contact the BON?

    Also, are you just talking about getting licenced as a RN, or for the actual CRNA position?

    THANKS A MILLION!
  11. by   suzanne4
    You can do a search on the computer under Yahoo or ? and put in your state's name and nursing licensure..that will take you to their website and their will contact info listed there.

    Good luck...................
  12. by   suzanne4
    You can do a search on the computer under Yahoo or ? and put in your state's name and nursing licensure..that will take you to their website and their will contact info listed there.

    Good luck...................

    Licenses for both are actually handled thru the same board of nursing.
    It doesn't matter whether you get your degree or not, what matters is if the board of nursing will let you be licensed in that area. All specialty licenses fall under them also.

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