CRNA lifestyle - page 3

I'm so curious to know how CRNA's live. By the hectic schedule I've been told about how do find time to go out and spend your money, like buy a big beautiful house, decorate it, buy clothes, and so... Read More

  1. by   redheadindixie
    Hi Andrea, I see that ALL of my posts have been removed.
    Sorry if I offended you. I never want to discourage young nurses, because it seems less and less young people are going into nursing.
    I guess after reading all of your posts my point was to go ahead and get started now in your undergraduate work, because you can make decisions about specialties as you get more involved in school and are around people who specialize in the areas you mentioned.
    Also I have been working alot the last few days and am short on sleep.
    Please accept my apologies.
  2. by   sproutsfriend
    Quote from ether
    Andrea, I am not talking directly to you. I guess I vented more than I usually do. I'm a NS, and I've been with a lot of NS who (in our first year of school) told everybody there were going to become a CRNA in the future. Soon clinicals came along, and these same people also puked during observed surgery, hated critical care, belive that C=RN, etc., etc.

    Let me give you a piece of advice. If you are not a nursing student, then that comes first. After that, make it through the first year before considering a specialty. Then ask to shadow a CRNA during your clinicals. I understand how impressive a large salary must sound, but I know that's not what you are all about. You must love science. Some SRNAs got in NA school after taking advanced chem, math, physics (more math), and biochemistry.

    Good luck finding your place in nursing.
    I agree, love the science. CRNA school requires you to constantly re-motivate yourself almost on a daily basis to sit and read sometimes hundreds of pages of material a day and then go power study it repeatedly. You have to really dig the science and want to learn it and understand it. The science will continually fascinate you and motivate you to keep on going forward.
  3. by   sonessrna
    Andrea...good for you!!! Congratulations on college and having goals!!!! I knew I wanted to be a CRNA when I was 18!!! I was a freshman in nursing at the time. Currently, I'm about a year into the CRNA program I wanted and I love it and hate it at the same time. (I'm taking a break from studying right now after spending 14 hours at the hospital today!). It's hard work and its a basic self sacrafice of your life for 2 years....the money will b e nice...but nicer will be the freedom to make some of your own decisions, enjoy your job, and provide patient care in one aspect that is controlled by what you think the patient needs rather than someone else. My deciison to become a crna was reinformced after talking with dozens of them and finding there was not one who did not love their jobs. I folllwed several and saw very little I did not like...I look forward to enjoyhing most of the aspects of my job...vs ICU nursing where I liked the patients hated most of the rest of it. WOrk hard, keep your eyes on the goal, talk to people like some on this board, follow some people....I'll think you'll do great!!!
  4. by   PilotJim68
    Quote from ether
    Andrea, I am not talking directly to you. I guess I vented more than I usually do. I'm a NS, and I've been with a lot of NS who (in our first year of school) told everybody there were going to become a CRNA in the future. Soon clinicals came along, and these same people also puked during observed surgery, hated critical care, belive that C=RN, etc., etc.

    Let me give you a piece of advice. If you are not a nursing student, then that comes first. After that, make it through the first year before considering a specialty. Then ask to shadow a CRNA during your clinicals. I understand how impressive a large salary must sound, but I know that's not what you are all about. You must love science. Some SRNAs got in NA school after taking advanced chem, math, physics (more math), and biochemistry.

    Good luck finding your place in nursing.
    Just an observation on my part....I am in Nursing IV of a five part ASN program...due to graduate in May 05. My class started out being very large, 112 students. Here we are a little more than a year later and there are about 65 left (For various reasons). Out of those students, there were 7 people that I know of, including myself, that had an interest or desire to become a CRNA. After clinicals and surgical rotations, there is only one person left that has actually stayed focused on that goal, ME!!! Everyone else has developed the C=RN attitude and many many people have told me that I am crazy since I want to continue to get my BSN, and eventually apply for CRNA school (I really think this poor attitude is a reflection of the local environment in which we live). I am focused on the initial goal of completing my A.S. in nursing FIRST and foremost, after that comes BSN while I am working critical care (working on securing an ICU position as we speak), then applying to a CRNA program. I keep the goal of CRNA in the back of my mind, but I try to stay focused on the here and now. So far, its been a hell of a lot of work and has taken a lot of dedication. Looking toward the future, its gonna take a lot more of the same and then some. But this is something that I have researched a lot and have a commitment to. In a way, I am glad that "most" of these CRNA hopefuls have the C=RN attitude now, it means less competition for me and just makes me a stronger candidate for acceptance to the BSN prgram AND a CRNA program. But the point is, find an interest that suits you, research it fully, set attainable short term goals without losing focus on the main goal, AND GO FOR IT !!!! Easier said than done, I know, but it has worked for me in many many cases and I hope it doesn't fail me in the future.
  5. by   sonessrna
    Quote from PilotJim68
    Just an observation on my part....I am in Nursing IV of a five part ASN program...due to graduate in May 05. My class started out being very large, 112 students. Here we are a little more than a year later and there are about 65 left (For various reasons). Out of those students, there were 7 people that I know of, including myself, that had an interest or desire to become a CRNA. After clinicals and surgical rotations, there is only one person left that has actually stayed focused on that goal, ME!!! Everyone else has developed the C=RN attitude and many many people have told me that I am crazy since I want to continue to get my BSN, and eventually apply for CRNA school (I really think this poor attitude is a reflection of the local environment in which we live). I am focused on the initial goal of completing my A.S. in nursing FIRST and foremost, after that comes BSN while I am working critical care (working on securing an ICU position as we speak), then applying to a CRNA program. I keep the goal of CRNA in the back of my mind, but I try to stay focused on the here and now. So far, its been a hell of a lot of work and has taken a lot of dedication. Looking toward the future, its gonna take a lot more of the same and then some. But this is something that I have researched a lot and have a commitment to. In a way, I am glad that "most" of these CRNA hopefuls have the C=RN attitude now, it means less competition for me and just makes me a stronger candidate for acceptance to the BSN prgram AND a CRNA program. But the point is, find an interest that suits you, research it fully, set attainable short term goals without losing focus on the main goal, AND GO FOR IT !!!! Easier said than done, I know, but it has worked for me in many many cases and I hope it doesn't fail me in the future.
    That's awesome that you are sticking with your goals. I noticed you said that while those people drop out of their interest in CRNA school your competition becomes less...actually, unfortunately it raises the bar you must compete against. All the people in my class were TOP of their class in nursing school and we were all very young leaders in the ICU. Now...we are all neck in neck for grades etc. It just raises the challenge which is good and bad!
  6. by   DIVER CRNA
    Hello,

    I have not been on the board for awhile as I prepare to start at Albany Med's CRNA program In September--Nice to be back

    Personally, in watching the board over the past three years I have noticed a heightened level of sensitivity to CRNA's and their pay. Andrea, I too was overwhelmed and curious to what it would be like to make over 100,000$/ year working forty hours a week. I dreamt of the things I could provide for my family i.e. A nice house, and I have always wanted a BMW!! Red M5. These dreams are not ridiculous or immature by any means. They are real and fun.

    Andrea you must realize that the CRNA profession is over 100 years old and it has been an uphill battle most of the way, -- in terms of increased autonomy, escaping physician supervision laws, Billing rights, practice rights-- you name the battle and the profession has endured and overcome many obstacles. So when you talk of the CRNA profession in a one liner post and mention solely money we all get a little crazy. If you decide to pursue a career in nursing anesthesia you will realize (if you don't already) that every penny is well deserved and that it is a continuous battle fighting over turf, pay etc.

    So as far as I am concerned dream away, and know I will have that red M5BMW some day and it will be well deserved--Jeff
  7. by   hell000nurse
    i must have missed something but....what the heck is 'C=RN'??
  8. by   PinsAndNeedles
    Quote from hell000nurse
    i must have missed something but....what the heck is 'C=RN'??
    That means that some students just do the bare mininmun to graduate with a degree so they can call themselves RNs. A grade of C is still passing for undergrad degrees.
  9. by   Dalit
    Quote from hell000nurse
    i must have missed something but....what the heck is 'C=RN'??

    All you need is a C to graduate...
  10. by   upstateRN
    Quote from hell000nurse
    i must have missed something but....what the heck is 'C=RN'??
    You revived an oldy

    I think it means who cares about the grade. You can graduate from NSG school with a C and get your RN, hence C=RN
  11. by   carachel2
    I'm not even a CRNA and this caught my eye. My husband makes about 100K (which I'm pretty sure is a starting CRNA salary) and trust me...after 401K and living conservatively to pay off a 15 year mortgage, there isn't a whole lot there for a "fancy car." GMAB.
  12. by   candiceena
    I am a CRNA hopeful as well. Right now, I'm finishing pre-reqs for nursing school. CRNA is years away, however, I would like to ask...those who are CRNAs currently, and those who are chastising (sp?) Andrea for her post or her motivations...if CRNAs made $20,000 a year, instead of $100,000+ - would you have been as drawn initially? As some have said, money should never be the ONLY motivation for a career, but it is always something that should be considered and will most likely be a motivator.
  13. by   yeSICU
    Of course people only become CRNAs, Lawyers, MDs and "insert well paying professional role here" for solely educational reasons paired with an intense obligation to society... right . I definitely agree it is a fair compensation for a high degree of responsibility (maybe not even that), but if people say money and lifestyle weren't major factors in their decision to pursue this career path I think they are either very altruistic (much like the nuns that pioneered anesthesia... thanks be to my sisters) or need join the rest of the "realists" that openly admit the value of a rewarding career/education that can provide secure futures for themselves, their families, and the opportunities that extra money in the bank can afford a child (which most of the CRNAs I know express this openly... it's only human... why do we all work in the first place?).::End beating of the dead horse now::

    btw: it is a little demeaning the way you phrased it (and as usual an ill phrased comment gets blown out of proportion)... people better themselves through education and hard work because they have a drive for more knowledge and opportunity. You basically equated all of their motives to desiring shallow material things. Read what you wrote out loud and you may find that your post comes off in a derogatory and immature manner (which was probably unintentional). I am not even a CRNA and I can definitely see that. You will get better and less defensive answers with some conscientious tact. People that feel appreciated/respected help others in need of guidance.

    Good luck with all of your career goals (and please don't ask a question like that during an interview...j/k)

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