Are CRNAs ashamed of being nurses? - page 2

I thought I would start a new thread to respond to the comment that some CRNAs act like they are ashamed of being nurses. It might surprise some of you "younger" folk that there has been (for lack... Read More

  1. by   Qwiigley
    I believe all schools require only 1 year of critical care experience. Now adays, with a nursing shortage, a new grad can go directly into the ICU then to CRNA school. I think schools should require at least 1 year of critical care, but a min of 5 years of nursing. IMHO
  2. by   melrey11
    Loisane,

    You should write a book. Ive read so many of your posts and you always nail things right on the head, even my head at times.

    Thank You for your input.....now, if I could box you up and put you in my bookbag during class/clinicals......
  3. by   msdeeva
    Just a question:


    What do you think about PAs or AAs, esp the ones that get a 2-year certificate, being able to practice in this field with less than the 5 year experience requirment that you desire?


    Quote from Qwiigley
    I believe all schools require only 1 year of critical care experience. Now adays, with a nursing shortage, a new grad can go directly into the ICU then to CRNA school. I think schools should require at least 1 year of critical care, but a min of 5 years of nursing. IMHO
  4. by   versatile_kat
    Quote from msdeeva
    Just a question:


    What do you think about PAs or AAs, esp the ones that get a 2-year certificate, being able to practice in this field with less than the 5 year experience requirment that you desire?

    This subject has been beaten to death already. Do a search on the board with AA or PA as the subject and you'll have a wealth of debates to read over.
  5. by   jwk
    Quote from msdeeva
    Just a question:


    What do you think about PAs or AAs, esp the ones that get a 2-year certificate, being able to practice in this field with less than the 5 year experience requirment that you desire?

    It's not a 2-yr certificate - it's a Master's Degree.
  6. by   msdeeva
    Riverside Community College in California has a 2 year certificate (PA). There are other colleges in California that also offer a certificate. King/Drew is a Bachelors; Western U is a Masters. Before I applied to nursing school, I checked out a few PA and AA degrees, and saw later that I could do a residency in anethesia (PA), or go straight into it with an AA. The AA degrees I was looking at, if I recall, were Master's. But I guess I really didn't pay attention to their degree requirements: 1. because I was qualified to apply (I have a B.S. in bio), and 2. It was out of state, and since I knew I didn't want to leave my husband, applying was out of the question.

    Anyway, I wasn't really referring to the Master's educated PAs or AAs, I was referring to the one's that obtained a certificate. I apologize for the misunderstanding.

    Quote from jwk
    It's not a 2-yr certificate - it's a Master's Degree.
    Last edit by msdeeva on Jun 13, '04
  7. by   msdeeva
    I'm not trying to be a smart alleck or anything, but I was asking Qwiigley's opinion of the the subject, b/c as s/he stated in the post that I quoted: S/he would like a 5-year requirement. I must stress that I don't intend to get into a debate. So if you're Qwiigley, I would like his or her opinion. If s/he has commented on this before, please direct me to his/her post on this matter.

    Thanks

    Quote from versatile_kat
    This subject has been beaten to death already. Do a search on the board with AA or PA as the subject and you'll have a wealth of debates to read over.
    Last edit by msdeeva on Jun 17, '04
  8. by   sonessrna
    I am an SRNA. I am proud of the sRNa that I represent. I think it is important for CRNAs/SRNAs to remember their roots and where they got their wonderful background. I was an ICU/CCU/OHR nurse for 4 years prior to being accpeted to CRNA school. My experience allowed me to approach patients in a nursing way, with compassion, caring, and understanding. I do think, however, that there is a problem with nursing. I think nursing (in general) lacks power and a voice. I think that is too bad. There are 2 million nurses in the US and many thousands fewer physicians. Is there a reason why physicians rule the healthcare system? Only because we nurses do not voice our concerns loud enough!.
  9. by   Qwiigley
    Also because many (not all, but many) nurses are petty and not realistic when it comes to their complaints. We will not be regarded as porfessional as long as we have these issues. All nurses know these issues, I don't believe I have to list.
  10. by   loisane
    Quote from melrey11
    Loisane,

    You should write a book. Ive read so many of your posts and you always nail things right on the head, even my head at times.

    Thank You for your input.....now, if I could box you up and put you in my bookbag during class/clinicals......
    Thanks for the kind words. It is very gratifying to me that my insight may have been helpful to someone else.

    I don't know about a book, but I am working on a couple of articles. Maybe someday---------;-)

    loisane crna
  11. by   dneill01
    I am glad to see that I may have churned the pot alittle regarding CRNAs being ashamed of their nursing background. What was really meant though is not being ashamed but rather so much better than their nursing coherts. I have seen this on numerous occasion (of course this is true with alot of advanced practice). The large majority are proud of the heritage and the steps they had to take to reach their goals. Maybe the problem that I see is from the CRNAs that acheived their Nursing degree with the sole intent of CRNA school (usually a degree in something other than nursing then attended a one year RN bridge)worked one year in nursing, then was picked up by some school that is concerned more with personality rather than ability. I truely believe that anyone pursueing an advance practice degree should have to pay their dues, not only for experience but also to develop a sense of pride for their foundation profession.
    I appreciate all of the great information and input by everyone on these boards, you have made me consider many things that I may not have realized regarding my CRNA education.
  12. by   zrmorgan
    Loisane-

    Here is a prime example of why it is important maintain our identity of being nurses first:

    http://nursingadvocacy.org/news/2004jun/vogue.html

    Seeing a collective effort such as this is refreshing. I am glad we can forgive history, and reunite. I think Hodgins would be happy with the way things are turning out. Can't blame her for creating her own organization though. It must have been rough(er) back then.
  13. by   loisane
    Quote from zrmorgan
    Loisane-

    Here is a prime example of why it is important maintain our identity of being nurses first:

    http://nursingadvocacy.org/news/2004jun/vogue.html
    You are absolutely correct, this is a great example.

    Unfortunately, things like the Vogue incident have happened before. But what is different now, is the unified response. There was a time when non-CRNA nurses took no notice of such things. How great to see this change!

    Similarly, CRNAs are doing a better job of being advocates for non-CRNA nursing issues. It's a win-win situation.

    loisane crna

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