New grads in critical care

  1. I am graduating with my ADN this spring and have been hired to work in the ICU/CCU at a smaller community hospital. I have worked there for 3 years as an aide/secretary/telemetry tech. Does anyone have any suggestions for classes, additional education that I can do to help with my transition into a critical care nurse?
    •  
  2. 4 Comments

  3. by   jenadox
    My hospital has a critical care orientation class that is separate from regular hospital orientation. During the class, they have a skills lab set up. Believe me, it is much easier to zero an A line for the first time when there isn't a pt hooked to the other end LOL.

    We were also able to practice shooting parameters with a Swan Ganz, and there was a vent with a glove on the end. It was neat to see how the different settings affected the lungs(glove). Is it possib;e for your hospital to set something like this up?

    You might also ask for a longer orientation period. I would get some CCRN study books, too. These have lots of info that you need to know whne employed in a unit, regardless of whether you plan to take the exam.

    Good luck to you! I ho[e you love working in critical care as much as I do

    Jena
  4. by   lovingnursing_r
    Originally posted by butter
    I am graduating with my ADN this spring and have been hired to work in the ICU/CCU at a smaller community hospital. I have worked there for 3 years as an aide/secretary/telemetry tech. Does anyone have any suggestions for classes, additional education that I can do to help with my transition into a critical care nurse?
    I JUST STARTED WORKING IN CCU AFTER BEING OUT OF SCHOOL FOR 1 YEAR. THE CHANGE WAS STILL HARD. YOU SHOULD LEARN AND "PLAY" WITH EVERYTHING WHILE SOMEONE IS THERE WITH YOU. READ LOTS OF BOOKS. DONT LET YOUR LEARNIND STOP AT ORIENTATION CLASSES OR IN YOUR JOB. HOPE YOU DO WELL. BEST WISHES. P.S. IT DOES GET BETTER!
  5. by   KRVRN
    Another good way to become familiar with the vent settings and such was to have an RT let you try breathing with it. We did that when I was in school. They gave us a mouthpiece and had us pinch our nose. Having the vent give you a breath right after you've just inhaled is damn uncomfortable (if it's not on a synchronized setting)!

    And it's true about it being easier to learn how to use equipment when there's not a pt at the other end. I found it kinda fun playing with A-lines and all.
  6. by   MarkHammerschmidt
    Hi Butter. May I respectfully submit my website for your consideration? It contains FAQ files for nurses new to the ICU environment: www.geocities.com/markhammerschmidt

close