How to become a case manager How to become a case manager - pg.2 | allnurses

How to become a case manager - page 2

Hi all! I am currently working in med/surg but within the next year or two hubby and I planned having a second child. Thus with pregnancy working with heavy assignment and acute patient care is... Read More

  1. Visit  RNinIN profile page
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    Where I live, no insurance or other CM jobs exist, except in hospitals, and they hire internally only. I don't like acute so that leaves me out of something that I think would be a great fit for me
  2. Visit  yshell12 profile page
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    There's a company known as the Kingstree Group. They train Case Managers and you can work from home. The website is Kingstree.net
  3. Visit  Kooky Korky profile page
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    Quote from mclennan
    I am a case manager RN. I also have a good relationship with my hiring manager and know why she hired me so here ya go:

    1. BSN. Most medical groups, insurance co.s, hospitals get better reimbursement and accreditation if CMs have BSN.

    2. Some experience in Public Health, health teaching, discharge planning, chronic condition management or something along those lines. Lots of states offer PHN licensure to BSNs whose program curriculum included community/public health that meets requirements. If you can get it, get it. My hiring manager, and 3 or 4 other CMs in my department were PHNs for some years before becoming CMs - she says that pretty much nailed why they hired me. Highlight any nursing experience in which you developed therapeutic, long term relationships with patients and followed them through chronic illness. Any telephone triage expertise or training is valuable too.

    3. Get certified as a CM either by the Commission for Case Manager Certification or the ANCC Case Manager Board Certification. I cannot emphasize this enough.

    4. Be prepared to sit in a cubicle all day calling patients, to wear business clothes, to earn salary instead of hourly, and go to lots of meetings. It is a far cry from working the floor, the clinic, or 12 hours in scrubs. And it's not always better, it can be just as crazy busy, complicated, stressful and the grind of 9-5, M-F isn't the paradise you might think. We have had a couple of CMs who came straight from inpatient, bedside shift work nursing leave after 5 or 6 months because they missed working with patients and having those 3 or 4 days off a week. And, they missed overtime pay.

    5. On the upside, it's very autonomous, independent work that actually uses nursing theory heavily, and really sharpens your critical thinking skills. Docs love us. Patients love that they don't have to come to as many appointments and have a go-to advocate. Case management is gonna be a big thing, it saves everyone money and increases patient satisfaction scores big time. And, the pay is great IF you have the experience and certification!

    Hope that helps and good luck!
    Most of the certs require experience as a CM, don't they? Thanks for your reply above. It is informative and portrays both the downs and the ups. (LOL - I started to say "pups").
  4. Visit  MBARNBSN profile page
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    Quote from Kooky Korky
    Most of the certs require experience as a CM, don't they? (LOL - I started to say "pups").
    Yes, the OP means when you qualify, it is a good idea to get the cert.
  5. Visit  chernt88 profile page
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    hi. I am also interested in shifting my career to non-clinical. I would want to be a nurse case manager but I do not have the experience nor the certificate. I have heard of University of Indiana offering certification program. Does anyone know about this if this legit? Can it be purely online since I am currently in KSA.
  6. Visit  BacktotheBeach profile page
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    I was just hired within my same hospital system for a Case Manager position. I have 4 years of med surg tele experience and a BSN, but no CM experience. I believe BSN was a requirement.

    I will wear scrubs (Yay!) with a lab coat, I will see patients in order to do discharge planning, work closely with doctors and social workers. I do have to work one weekend a month. This job is a salary position. Certification is not required, but I'm told some get it.
  7. Visit  MBARNBSN profile page
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    Quote from chernt88
    hi. I am also interested in shifting my career to non-clinical. I would want to be a nurse case manager but I do not have the experience nor the certificate. I have heard of University of Indiana offering certification program. Does anyone know about this if this legit? Can it be purely online since I am currently in KSA.
    Try contacting the school and ask your questions. With that said, read posts in this thread. The information for the most part is not out dated. For example, a certification prior to becoming a case manager is not necessary since most do not qualify to sit for the exam until he/she has work experience. Also, although Case Management does not involve direct patient care, it is not a non-clinical role. We work with patients, MDs, ancillary departments, etc.... to influence the medical model. Good luck.

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